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I am trying to find missing records for a task that is run every hour, but occasionally fails. The task creates records with a timestamp called start_datetime.

I also have a table that has every date/time for the same range, with none missing.

What I essentially want is something like this, which should find all the dates in the audit table that are not in the table that documents the tasks:

select audithour
  from lkup_audithour ahr
 where audithour <= sysdate
   and audithour not in (select start_datetime from myTable);

But, this won't work, because the task can start a few minutes later than the top of the hour, so while the date and the hour would match, the minutes might not. And that's ok.

What I've come up with is ugly, comparing the year, month, day, and hour manually. Is there a better way to do this?

select audithour
  from lkup_audithour
 where audithour <= sysdate
   and audithour not in (
       select audithour
         from lkup_audithour lah
         join MyTable mt
           on extract(year from lah.audithour) = extract (year from mt.start_datetime)
          and extract(month from lah.audithour) = extract (month from mt.start_datetime)
          and extract(day from lah.audithour) = extract (day from mt.start_datetime)
          and extract(hour from cast(lah.audithour as timestamp)) = extract (hour from cast(mt.start_datetime as timestamp))
      )
3

Use TRUNC( date_value, 'HH' ) to truncate to the start of the hour:

select audithour
  from lkup_audithour ahr
 where audithour <= sysdate
   and TRUNC( audithour, 'HH' ) not in (
         select TRUNC( start_datetime, 'HH' )
         from   myTable
       );
1

Use the trunc function, passing in the 'HH24' format. This will lose anything on the datetime value minutes or lower in value, giving a clean start of the hour to compare.

The TRUNC (date) function returns date with the time portion of the day truncated to the unit specified by the format model fmt.

on trunc(lah.audithour, 'HH24') = trunc(mt.start_datetime, 'HH24')

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