1

I'm working with Core Data. I have a field called date that could contain a date or nil.

I want to make a second field called sortDate that will use the date value from the date field if there is one. If the date field is nil, I want to return the current date. I need this to be a core data attribute (not a computed property) because I need to sort fetched records based on this value.

I think the way to do this is with derived attributes but I can't find any information on how to use them. I selected the checkbox called "Derived". This shows the "Derivation expression" field, but I have no idea what to enter here. There is no link to documentation on the Xcode UI.

Despite the comment below, I cannot locate any documentation for this feature. I've searched the documentation many times and can't find a single word from Apple about this other than this WWDC session where they mention documentation but do not link to it to say how to find it.

I'm not the only one failing to find this: Documentation on core data derived attributes

  • 1
    Pros and cons of derived attributes are well documented on this and other web sites. Watch the WWDC 2019 session "Making Apps With Core Data" at approximately 18:00 in for a good overview of Core Data managed derived attributes. You've not mentioned the volume of data you'll be recalling (do you or are you experiencing performance problems?) so it will be difficult to provide advice as to "needs of controller vs needs of model". Are you using an NSFetchedResultsController? Have you tried building compound predicates? – andrewbuilder Sep 25 at 12:13
  • I don't see derived attributes anywhere on the Core Data documentation. Not a single mention of them. The documentation mentioned in the video does not seem to exist either.I don't expect high volume or performance issues. I see the new checkbox and field in the Xcode inspector but can find no information on using those features. I can't answer what haven't tried because as I said "I'm not sure where to start" as in I really don't know, not "I've tried stuff but don't want to tell you" – radicalappdev Sep 25 at 14:04

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.