2

This question has been in the back of my mind for years. I am putting in a little history/context.

When I programmed C++ back in the day, I had a firm grasp on "memory leak": you call new X and then you call delete X. If you don't do the second part too many times, you could see the effect as an unbounded growth in the RAM your program consumed.

However, all was put back to zero when you killed the app and restarted. For this reason, it was (not maybe the best solution) do-able to fix a memory leak by forcing a restart.

I was vaguely aware, when I did some WinApi programming, that it was possible to screw up and start a "handle leak". The resource monitor shows you this, and I think it was the case that killing the program did not forgive you for your bad code. I kind of assumed you would have to reboot. But the reality was I adopted extra amounts of paranoia to avoid these leaks rather than try to actually understand their root cause.

With .NET objects get automatically reference counted and a background thread sweeps up the memory consumed by allocations to orphaned objects. But then there are still these things that hint at the possibility of screwing up like the term "unmanaged resource".

I have thus far kept myself feeling "safe" by always following pattern that I see, for example, if I want to query SQL I'll google it first and find something like:

public DataTable GetData(SqlCommand cmd)
{
    DataTable dt = new DataTable();
   String strConnString  
   =System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["conString"].ConnectionString;
    SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(strConnString);
    cmd.Connection = con;
    SqlDataAdapter sda = new SqlDataAdapter();
    cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
    try
    {
        con.Open();
        sda.SelectCommand = cmd;
        sda.Fill(dt);
    }
    catch
    {
        return dt;
    }
    finally
    {
        con.Close();
        cmd.Dispose();
        sda.Dispose();
    }
    return dt;
}

My problem is I've never taken the time to wonder "What if I didn't close the connection?" - I just employ the copy/paste technique and move on.

The advent of code snippet tools like LinqPad has got me thinking about this again because I've often tempted to play around with APIs, like for instance I just ran the snippet:

string qbConStr = @"DSN=QuickBooks Data;SERVER=QODBC;OptimizerDBFolder=%UserProfile%\QODBC Driver for QuickBooks\Optimizer;OptimizerAllowDirtyReads=N;SyncFromOtherTables=Y;IAppReadOnly=Y";
OdbcConnection connection = new OdbcConnection(qbConStr);
connection.Open();
connection.GetSchema();

I didn't feel like using "good form" because, after all, it's a snippett, right?

Question: Right?

2

I don't know how you can cause a handle leak / irrepairable damage that can't be fixed by terminating a process - I'm sure that its possible, but you need to be trying reasonably hard to do it (failing to close database connections of file handles won't cause this - these will be released by the OS as when the process terminates).

FYI, rather than using try-catch in this way you should just use dispose instead - under the covers it does the same thing, but the result is cleaner and easier to read:

public DataTable GetData(SqlCommand cmd)
{
    DataTable dt = new DataTable();
    string strConnString  = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["conString"].ConnectionString;
    using (SqlConnection con = new SqlConnection(strConnString))
    {
        cmd.Connection = con;
        using (SqlDataAdapter sda = new SqlDataAdapter())
        {
            cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
            con.Open();
            sda.SelectCommand = cmd;
            sda.Fill(dt);
        }
    }
    return dt;
}

You should avoid catching swallwoing exceptions too - if the above throws an exception it is better if the caller handles it. Also you should leave disposing of the SqlCommand up to the caller, as they passed the command in and may want to re-use it.

One last note on dispose and disposable objects - handles and other operating system resources will be cleaned up when the process terminates, but this is not the same as calling the dispose method, which is not done automatically when the process terminates. This is significant in certain situations, for example when using StreamWriter to write to a file. This stream is buffered and so unless you call Flush (or Dispose which in turn calls Flush), you may find that the resulting text file is truncated.

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