125

How can I set a figure window's title in pylab/python?

fig = figure(9) # 9 is now the title of the window
fig.set_title("Test") #doesn't work
fig.title = "Test" #doesn't work
2
  • 6
    plt.suptitle('figure title') and plt.gcf().canvas.set_window_title('window title') and plt.figure('window title') May 11, 2018 at 17:13
  • Note that plt.figure() seem to act differently than canvas.manager.set_window_title( fig_name ). Canvas will not modify the labels as returned by plt.get_figlabels(). You can also not acces the figure later on by doing plt.figure(fig_name)
    – Adrien Mau
    Feb 3, 2023 at 14:31

8 Answers 8

176

If you want to actually change the window you can do:

fig = pylab.gcf()
fig.canvas.set_window_title('Test')

Update 2021-05-15:

The solution above is deprecated (see here). instead use

fig = pylab.gcf()
fig.canvas.manager.set_window_title('Test')
2
  • Not working. I have multiple figures that will be shown. Also, I'm importing pylab via from pylab import * and pylab.title("test") and title("test") don't work.
    – Omar
    Apr 28, 2011 at 2:53
  • I use this code: matplotlib.org/3.1.0/gallery/user_interfaces/… and wonder how to rename a matplotlib figure here? Any ideas?
    – sqp_125
    Jun 27, 2019 at 11:46
67

You can also set the window title when you create the figure:

fig = plt.figure("YourWindowName")
1
  • 2
    From the docs: If num is a string, the window title will be set to this figure's num. I see most people pass in a number, so passing in the title directly would be so much better. Thank you!
    – varagrawal
    Jul 16, 2020 at 23:03
39

Based on Andrew' answer, if you use pyplot instead of pylab, then:

fig = pyplot.gcf()
fig.canvas.set_window_title('My title')
1
  • 4
    Warning: The set_window_title function was deprecated in Matplotlib 3.4 and will be removed two minor releases later. Use manager.set_window_title or GUI-specific methods instead. Apr 29, 2021 at 17:23
21

I used fig.canvas.set_window_title('The title') with fig obtained with pyplot.figure() and it worked well too:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
...
fig = plt.figure(0)
fig.canvas.set_window_title('Window 3D')

enter image description here

(Seems .gcf() and .figure() does similar job here.)

3
  • 3
    Looks like .figure() create a new figure whereas .gcf() stands for get current figure which is what it does actually.
    – Ibrahim.H
    Aug 5, 2019 at 10:12
  • 1
    Ibrahim's comment should be edited into the answer. Also: Warning: The set_window_title function was deprecated in Matplotlib 3.4 and will be removed two minor releases later. Use manager.set_window_title or GUI-specific methods instead. Apr 29, 2021 at 17:24
  • plt.figure('1') seem to act differently than canvas.manager.set_window_title( fig_name ). Canvas will not modify the labels as returned by plt.get_figlabels(). You can also not acces the figure later on by doing plt.figure(fig_name)
    – Adrien Mau
    Feb 3, 2023 at 14:30
7

I found this was what I needed for pyplot:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
....
plt.get_current_fig_manager().canvas.set_window_title('My Figure Name')
1
  • 1
    Useful when using state-based plt.subplot() which doesn't give a fig object
    – joshua
    May 3, 2021 at 23:59
6

I have found that using the canvas object, as in these two examples:

fig.canvas.set_window_title('My title')

as suggested by some other answers (1, 2), and

plt.get_current_fig_manager().canvas.set_window_title('My Figure Name')

from benjo's answer, both give this warning:

The set_window_title function was deprecated in Matplotlib 3.4 and will be removed two minor releases later. Use manager.set_window_title or GUI-specific methods instead.

The solution seems to be to adapt Benjo's answer and use:

plt.get_current_fig_manager().set_window_title('My Figure Name')

That is to say drop the use of canvas. This gets rid of the warning.

5

Code that works now (09.04.23, matplotlib 3.7.1):

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
x = [1,2,3,4,5]
y = [2,4,6,8,10]
plt.plot(x,y)
plt.get_current_fig_manager().set_window_title('My Figure Name')
plt.show()
0

From Matplotlib 3.4 and later the function set_window_title was deprecated.

You can use matplotlib.pyplot.suptitle() which behaves like set_window_title.

See: matplotlib.pyplot.suptitle

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