1

I have a bit of a race condition going on, where a row in DB might be created by two threads at the same time. To get around this, I've implemented retries, like so:

int retries = 0;
while (true)
{                
    try
    {
        var saved = context.Table.FirstOrDefault(x => x.field1 == val1 && x.field2 == val2);

        if (saved != null)
        {
            //edits saved
        }
        else
        {
            context.Table.Add(new Table
            {
                field1 = val1,
                field2 = val2
            });
        }
        await context.SaveChangesAsync();
        return Json(true);
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        if (retries >= 5)
            throw (e);
        retries++;
    }
}

Somehow this fails 5 times in a row with the same error:

Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.DbUpdateException: An error occurred while updating the entries. See the inner exception for details. ---> System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException: Cannot insert duplicate key row in object 'dbo.Table' with unique index 'IX_Table_field1_field2'. The duplicate key value is (val1, val2).

Why is FirstOrDefault returning null, even though the row clearly exists in the database? I'm using Microsoft.AspNetCore.All v.2.1.4

EDIT: For clarification. The context is not being shared between threads. The race occurs when multiple HTTP requests arrive at the same time. The context is injected into the controller (where this code is). It was registered with an AddDbContext call with default settings, making its ServiceLifetime scoped.

SOLUTION: Fenixil's comment gave me the necessary hint. The added, but unsaved row remains in context and keeps trying to get inserted. I kept a reference to the new row and added this to the catch block:

context.Entry(NewRow).State = EntityState.Detached;
1
  • please vote for the answer it it was useful for you.
    – fenixil
    Oct 3, 2019 at 3:23

3 Answers 3

1

Did you shared DbContext? DbContext is not thread safe.

Try wrapping your insert operation in a using block of DbContext, instead of a retry:

using(var context = new DbContext)
{
  // Insert operation here
}

The conflict is easy to understand, but first you need to know that when you await a call, the thread immediately returns to the caller.

Image this scenario, you have two threads, running your code. Here is the execute order:

  1. Thread 1: FirstOrDefault returns null.
  2. Thread 2: FirstOrDefault returns null.
  3. Thread 1: Add runs. SQL generated and queued at database server.
  4. Thread 1: await context.SaveChangesAsync(). The call completes immediately.
  5. Database: Completed call from Thread 1.
  6. Thread 2: Add runs. SQL generated and queued at database server.
  7. Thread 2: await context.SaveChangesAsync(). The call completes immediately.
  8. Database: Tried call from Thread 2, but cannot complete it because a row with the same key value was inserted before.
1
  • It is not shared. It is injected with default settings, so the ServiceLifetime is Scoped. The goal isn't to avoid the race entirely. I just don't understand how the same thread can fail 5 times - after the first fail, the row should exist and the next FirstOrDefault call should return it. Sep 30, 2019 at 6:41
0

If there is a record in the database with val1 as a key but val2 is different, firstOrDefault() will not return a value and you still won't be able to insert new record.

It also can be caching issue. You can try add AsNoTracking() to your query.

2
  • Both of those fields are in the key. From OnModelCreating: modelBuilder.Entity<Table>().HasKey(x => new { x.field1, x.field2 }).ForSqlServerIsClustered(false); It's not clustered because another index needs it more. What would AsNoTracking accomplish? Does it have some caching behaviour? I kinda need it to track, because if the row is retrieved, it might get updated. Sep 30, 2019 at 6:45
  • I think that caching is the issue in this case. Because the context is not being renewed and in this case first value with the same key will be loaded in the memory and will be cached. So AsNoTracking() will disable object level caching for this specific entity. The solution that worked for you does exactly that. There are other ways to deal with ef caching, you can refresh entity, detach entity, recreate dbContext, call GetDatabaseValues to get updated data ... or using AsNoTracking (). If you need to edit and save entities you can attach the edited entities to the context. Oct 1, 2019 at 1:57
0

Retries do not work because once you add entry to the context and receive conflict error, entry still marked as inserted, so that you'll try to insert it on all further retries. You need either use new context or detach it to make retries work.

Transaction

If you want to ensure that nobody can add a record when you are trying to find it, then you need to use transactions:

using (var context = new MyContext())
using (var transaction = context.Database.BeginTransaction(IsolationLevel.Serializable)) {
        var saved = context.Table.FirstOrDefault(x => x.field1 == val1 && x.field2 == val2);
        if (saved != null)
        {
            //edits saved
        }
        else
        {
            context.Table.Add(new Table
            {
                field1 = val1,
                field2 = val2
            });
        }
        await context.SaveChangesAsync();
        transaction.Commit()
        return Json(true);
}

I use most isolated level here to lockdown the table and prevent race conditions in reading. This approach has performance implications and if retry is acceptable you can still follow this approach.

Upsert

If you have all required data for a new entity then you can use FlexLabs.Upsert - update or insert will be executed in a single transaction so you won't have a collision anymore.

Retry

Please note, that if update is no idempotent you may still have racecondition but now you moved it to the DB side: 2 threads found an item, update it individually and saved. You can use concurrency tokens as described in this article to avoid such sort of collision. Please remember that update must be idempotent if you stick to retry option, it means that no matter how many threads will update the entity - it will be the same as after the first update.

There is a great framework Polly.NET which could be very handy for you:

await Policy.Handle<DbUpdateException>()
            .RetryAsync(5)
            .ExecuteAsync(() => ...);

I'd not recommend to use any in-process locks on your DbContext (or anything else) because that limits you to have a single process running with this logic what is not the case when you need high availability.

3
  • I don't want to ensure that. I want to retrieve the row, that was created by another thread, in the retry. Sep 30, 2019 at 6:42
  • 1
    Then just use new context between the retries: once you add an entry on the first retry it will try to insert it in all further retries and fail with the same error.
    – fenixil
    Sep 30, 2019 at 7:02
  • Added section about idempotency, be careful with update. Please vote for the answer if it was useful for you, I'd appreciate for carma :)
    – fenixil
    Oct 2, 2019 at 1:58

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