122

I want to know the equivalent of the ToObject<>() method in Json.NET for System.Text.Json.

Using Json.NET you can use any JToken and convert it to a class. For example:

var str = ""; // Some JSON string
var jObj = JObject.Parse(str);
var myClass = jObj["SomeProperty"].ToObject<SomeClass>();

How would we be able to do this with .NET Core 3's new System.Text.Json?

var str = ""; // Some JSON string
var jDoc = JsonDocument.Parse(str);
var myClass = jDoc.RootElement.GetProperty("SomeProperty"). <-- now what??

Initially, I was thinking I'd just convert the JsonElement that is returned in jDoc.RootElement.GetPRoperty("SomeProperty") to a string and then deserialize that string. But I feel that might not be the most efficient method, and I can't really find documentation on doing it another way.

4 Answers 4

130

In .NET 6, extension methods were added to JsonSerializer to deserialize an object directly from a JsonElement or JsonDocument:

public static partial class JsonSerializer
{
    public static TValue? Deserialize<TValue>(this JsonDocument document, JsonSerializerOptions? options = null);
    public static object? Deserialize(this JsonDocument document, Type returnType, JsonSerializerOptions? options = null);
    public static TValue? Deserialize<TValue>(this JsonDocument document, JsonTypeInfo<TValue> jsonTypeInfo);
    public static object? Deserialize(this JsonDocument document, Type returnType, JsonSerializerContext context);

    public static TValue? Deserialize<TValue>(this JsonElement element, JsonSerializerOptions? options = null);
    public static object? Deserialize(this JsonElement element, Type returnType, JsonSerializerOptions? options = null);
    public static TValue? Deserialize<TValue>(this JsonElement element, JsonTypeInfo<TValue> jsonTypeInfo);
    public static object? Deserialize(this JsonElement element, Type returnType, JsonSerializerContext context);
}

Now you will be able to do:

using var jDoc = JsonDocument.Parse(str);
var myClass = jDoc.RootElement.GetProperty("SomeProperty").Deserialize<SomeClass>();

Notes:

  • JsonDocument is disposable. According to the documentation, This class utilizes resources from pooled memory... failure to properly dispose this object will result in the memory not being returned to the pool, which will increase GC impact across various parts of the framework.

    So, be sure to declare your jDoc with a using statement.

  • The new methods should be present in .NET 6.0 Preview RC1.

    They were added in response to the enhancement request We should be able serialize and serialize from DOM #31274, which has been closed.

  • Similar extension methods were added for the new JsonNode mutable JSON document node as well

    public static TValue? Deserialize<TValue>(this JsonNode? node, JsonSerializerOptions? options = null)
    public static object? Deserialize(this JsonNode? node, Type returnType, JsonSerializerOptions? options = null)
    public static TValue? Deserialize<TValue>(this JsonNode? node, JsonTypeInfo<TValue> jsonTypeInfo)
    public static object? Deserialize(this JsonNode? node, Type returnType, JsonSerializerContext context)
    

In .NET 5 and earlier these methods do not exist. As a workaround, you may get better performance by writing to an intermediate byte buffer rather than to a string, since both JsonDocument and Utf8JsonReader work directly with byte spans rather than strings or char spans. As stated in the documentation:

Serializing to UTF-8 is about 5-10% faster than using the string-based methods. The difference is because the bytes (as UTF-8) don't need to be converted to strings (UTF-16).

public static partial class JsonExtensions
{
    public static T ToObject<T>(this JsonElement element, JsonSerializerOptions options = null)
    {
        var bufferWriter = new ArrayBufferWriter<byte>();
        using (var writer = new Utf8JsonWriter(bufferWriter))
            element.WriteTo(writer);
        return JsonSerializer.Deserialize<T>(bufferWriter.WrittenSpan, options);
    }

    public static T ToObject<T>(this JsonDocument document, JsonSerializerOptions options = null)
    {
        if (document == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(document));
        return document.RootElement.ToObject<T>(options);
    }
}

A demo fiddle is here.

11
  • 5
    Still using this answer on dotnet 5 some 18 months later. Needs a writer.Flush(); after element.WriteTo(writer); though otherwise you sometimes get System.Text.Json.JsonException: 'Expected depth to be zero at the end of the JSON payload. There is an open JSON object or array that should be closed.
    – mclayton
    Mar 3, 2021 at 21:47
  • 1
    @mclayton - I do dispose of the Utf8JsonWriter writer via a using statement, and according to the docs the dispose method In the case of IBufferWriter, this advances the underlying IBufferWriter<T> based on what has been written so far. and the flush method also advances the underlying IBufferWriter<T> based on what has been written so far. Doing both does not seem necessary.
    – dbc
    Mar 5, 2021 at 18:07
  • 4
    Ah, my bad. I was “using” the C# 8.0 form of using ... using var writer = new Utf8JsonWriter(bufferWriter); so the Dispose only gets called at the end of the function, which totally changes the behaviour of the code and needed the Flush to fix it. What a difference a couple of brackets makes!
    – mclayton
    Mar 5, 2021 at 18:27
  • 1
    @Ason - And JsonSerializer internally deserializes from utf8 byte sequences, so JsonSerializer.Deserialize<TValue>(string json, ...) transcodes back to utf8 before deserializing. My methods simply skip the transcoding back and forth.
    – dbc
    May 29, 2021 at 16:15
  • 1
    ArrayBufferWriter seems to be a .NET Core thing. Can I replace it with ArrayPoolBufferWriter from Microsoft.Toolkit.HighPerformance nuget package when working in .NET Framework 4.8?
    – dotNET
    Feb 4, 2022 at 10:47
110

I came across the same issue, so I wrote some extension methods, which work fine for now. It would be nice if they provided this as built-in method to avoid the additional allocation to a string.

public static T ToObject<T>(this JsonElement element)
{
    var json = element.GetRawText();
    return JsonSerializer.Deserialize<T>(json);
}
public static T ToObject<T>(this JsonDocument document)
{
    var json = document.RootElement.GetRawText();
    return JsonSerializer.Deserialize<T>(json);
}

Then use as follows:

jDoc.RootElement.GetProperty("SomeProperty").ToObject<SomeClass>();
3
  • 5
    This is exactly what I ended up doing as well. I posted the question to see if there was a more efficient way without that string allocation as you have mentioned. Maybe we'll have to wait until system.text.json is a little more mature.
    – Stalfos
    Oct 2, 2019 at 17:57
  • 16
    Yup, though it isn't about string allocation only. It's more about parsing the textual representation of the whole JSON again. It was already parsed once when the JsonElement/Document was created so it's a waste of CPU too.
    – Elephantik
    May 21, 2020 at 14:46
  • 1
    dude... EXACTLY WHAT I Was trying to do. Thanks so much for adding this!
    – ganjeii
    Feb 8, 2022 at 22:19
11

Same as dbc's answer, just including the methods which allow you to specify a return type via Type returnType.

public static partial class JsonExtensions
{
    public static T ToObject<T>(this JsonElement element, JsonSerializerOptions options = null)
    {
        var bufferWriter = new ArrayBufferWriter<byte>();
        using (var writer = new Utf8JsonWriter(bufferWriter))
        {
            element.WriteTo(writer);
        }

        return JsonSerializer.Deserialize<T>(bufferWriter.WrittenSpan, options);
    }

    public static T ToObject<T>(this JsonDocument document, JsonSerializerOptions options = null)
    {
        if (document == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(document));
        }

        return document.RootElement.ToObject<T>(options);
    }       

    public static object ToObject(this JsonElement element, Type returnType, JsonSerializerOptions options = null)
    {
        var bufferWriter = new ArrayBufferWriter<byte>();
        using (var writer = new Utf8JsonWriter(bufferWriter))
        {
            element.WriteTo(writer);
        }

        return JsonSerializer.Deserialize(bufferWriter.WrittenSpan, returnType, options);
    }

    public static object ToObject(this JsonDocument document, Type returnType, JsonSerializerOptions options = null)
    {
        if (document == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(document));
        }

        return document.RootElement.ToObject(returnType, options);
    }       
}
1
  • 2
    serializing back to a text seems not a efficient way
    – Mightywill
    Mar 17, 2021 at 9:31
10

.NET 6 introduced the System.Text.Json.Nodes namespace, which provides a way to do this using almost exactly the same syntax as Json.Net:

var str = ""; // some json string
var node = JsonNode.Parse(str);
var myClass = node["SomeProperty"].Deserialize<SomeClass>();

The namespace includes 4 new types: JsonNode, JsonArray, JsonObject, and JsonValue which can be used to access or modify values within the DOM. JsonNode is the base class for the other three types.

The Deserialize extension methods listed in dbc's answer have also been added to operate on JsonNode, eg:

public static TValue? Deserialize<TValue>(this JsonNode? node, JsonSerializerOptions? options = null);

JsonNode is not disposable so you do not need to use the using syntax.

Use AsObject() or AsArray() to parse to a JsonObject or JsonArray, respectively:

// parse array
JsonArray arr = JsonNode.Parse(@"[{""Name"": ""Bob"", ""Age"":30}]").AsArray();
// parse object
JsonObject obj = JsonNode.Parse(@"{""Name"": ""Bob"", ""Age"":30}").AsObject();
// get a value
var date = JsonNode.Parse(@"{""Date"":""2021-12-21T13:24:46+04:00""}")["Date"].GetValue<DateTimeOffset>();

Once the json has been parsed it's possible to navigate, filter and transform the DOM and/or apply Deserialize<T>() to map to your concrete type.

To serialize back to a json string you can use ToJsonString(), eg:

string innerNodeJson = node["SomeProperty"].ToJsonString();

Please see this answer to Equivalent of JObject in System.Text.Json for more details information about JsonObject.

1
  • This seems to suffer from issues in that if you try and deserialize this to a Dictionary<string, object> every value in the dictionary is still a JsonElement as opposed to a JsonNode making is extremely difficult to work with. Dec 14, 2023 at 0:29

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