8

Hello I'm trying to use the assignment hyper operator in Perl 6 https://docs.perl6.org/language/operators#Hyper_operators

my (@one, @two) «=» (<1 2 3>,<4 5 6>);
say @one;
say @two;
# Prints nothing (empty array)

# Expected behaviour:
@one=<1 2 3>;
@two=<4 5 6>;
say @one;
say @two;
# Prints [1 2 3] and [4 5 6]

How to make the assignment hyper operator operate correctly? Thanks.

  • Per the doc, hyperops cycle thru the elements of a list/array pointed to by the hyper symbol (i.e. a list on the left if «op... is used, and on the right if ...op» is used) if it's shorter than the other list. But the arrays on the left are completely empty, so there are zero elements to cycle thru, so the assignments all disappear into the great bit bucket in the sky. – raiph Sep 28 at 14:05
  • Thank you for the comment and clarification. It looks like the use of hyper operator for the task of assignment was not suitable for the nested list. It's apperantly caused by the = operator's inability to do the assignment if it's assigning a list. Fortunately, the zip operator as a meta operator operated as expected. – Romario Sep 29 at 15:36
  • 1
    Hi @Romario. It's not suitable if a target list has no elements, which rules out its use for initialization, and thus your example, but it's fine for assignment, including to nested lists, if cycling is desired and/or autovivification / autoextending isn't. Thus, for example, my (@a, @b); @a[2] = @b[2] = Nil; (@a, @b) «=» (<1 2 3>, <4 5 6 7>); say @a, @b; displays [1 2 3][7 5 6]. – raiph Sep 29 at 16:51
10

You were close. Just a little bit further in the docs down we find

The zip metaoperator (which is not the same thing as Z) will apply a given infix operator to pairs taken one left, one right, from its arguments.

So

my (@one, @two) Z= <1 2 3>, <4 5 6>;

Here's a benchmark, running on the current developer build. It compares the "magic" variant above with two sequential assignments.

use v6;
use Benchmark;

my %results = timethese(100000, {
    "magic" => sub { my (@one, @two) Z= <1 2 3>, <4 5 6> },
    "plain" => sub { my @one = <1 2 3>; my @two = <4 5 6> },
});

say ~%results;

# magic   1569668462 1569668464 2 0.00002
# plain   1569668464 1569668464 0 0
  • 1
    I assume this is a golf. From a performance point of view, my @one = <1 2 3>; my @two = <4 5 6> would be orders of magnitude faster. I'm just saying: Perl 6 has many features, but you don't have to use all of them all of the time :-) – Elizabeth Mattijsen Sep 27 at 23:08
  • @ElizabethMattijsen Actually, there is no significant difference. See above. – Holli Sep 28 at 11:03
  • @ElizabethMattijsen Basically, my concern was not performance but rather do the assignment in an elegant way.This way of assignment is code-wise scalable i.e. you can do the assignment of many variables in one, concise step. Of course that depends on the view of the programmer, too. – Romario Sep 29 at 15:43
  • 1
    @Holli feels to me there is an issues with the Benchmark module: for ^100000 { my (@one, @two) Z= <1 2 3>, <4 5 6> }; say now - INIT now says 1.25 seconds for me, and for ^100000 { my @one = <1 2 3>; my @two = <4 5 6> }; say now - INIT now say 0.12 seconds. So that's a factor of 10 difference in my book. – Elizabeth Mattijsen Sep 29 at 20:51
  • It's more like a factor of 7 on my system, but yeah. – Holli Sep 29 at 21:42

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.