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I'm a junior JAVA developer and I'm supposed to develop some transaction messages. The given specifications include hex value 0x10000000 or 0x20000000, and I'm really bad at data communications, I refer mostly to http://www.asciitable.com/ to help me translate between formats, but I'm really confused about this 0x10000000. In decimal format, it is 268,435,456, unusually big, and I couldn't find anything on ASCII format.

I'm just wondering why they would provide that hex value cause I'm missing something here, and the previous version of this transaction device I'm working on has hex value in 4 characters like 0x33 or 0x31. What are the differences here or what am I missing out here (in terms of understanding)?

  • Try System.out.println(Integer.toBinaryString(0x10000000)); - and clearly 268,435,456 is not an ascii character. – Elliott Frisch Sep 30 '19 at 3:38
  • It is just the value, that changed. It is still an hexadecimal int literal. Since 8 digits are provided after the 0x, all 32 bits are addressed (at least more or less..). Your values are the same as 1 << 28 and 1 << 29. – Islingre Sep 30 '19 at 3:39
  • @ElliottFrisch yes I have mentioned "In decimal format, it is 268,435,456, unusually big, and I couldn't find anything on ASCII format." – Ken Sep 30 '19 at 3:43
  • Correct. Because ASCII is an 8-bit symbology. Java integers are 32-bits. – Elliott Frisch Sep 30 '19 at 3:46
  • @Islingre thank you so much, i'm sorry but what is 1<<28 and 1<<29? – Ken Sep 30 '19 at 3:47

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