593

I want to discard all changes done after commit <commit-hash> . So I did:

git reset --hard <commit-hash>

Now I want to do the same with my remote. How can I do this? I have done some commits (and pushes) after <commit-hash> and I just want to discard them all. Is just something went terribly wrong in the way and I don't want to make it worse than it is already. ;(

I basically want to rewind my origin/master to <commit-hash>

  • 2
    Are you sure your origin/master has not been pulled and pushed to by other users? Changing history of a public (ie non-local) repository is something you want to avoid at all times. – vindia Apr 28 '11 at 9:54
  • Possible duplicate of How to revert multiple git commits? – Michael Freidgeim Sep 2 '18 at 8:25
1040

Assuming that your branch is called master both here and remotely, and that your remote is called origin you could do:

 git reset --hard <commit-hash>
 git push -f origin master

However, you should avoid doing this if anyone else is working with your remote repository and has pulled your changes. In that case, it would be better to revert the commits that you don't want, then push as normal.

Update: you've explained below that other people have pulled the changes that you've pushed, so it's better to create a new commit that reverts all of those changes. There's a nice explanation of your options for doing this in this answer from Jakub Narębski. Which one is most convenient depends on how many commits you want to revert, and which method makes most sense to you.

Since from your question it's clear that you have already used git reset --hard to reset your master branch, you may need to start by using git reset --hard ORIG_HEAD to move your branch back to where it was before. (As always with git reset --hard, make sure that git status is clean, that you're on the right branch and that you're aware of git reflog as a tool to recover apparently lost commits.) You should also check that ORIG_HEAD points to the right commit, with git show ORIG_HEAD.

  • 18
    Danger danger: this reset assumes that the corresponding (tracking) branch is currently checked out and there are no uncommitted changes that you wanted to keep. Use git update-ref instead of reset --hard; it will allow you to do the same without having a working tree/checked out branch – sehe Apr 28 '11 at 9:59
  • 3
    I see. It has been pushed and changed by others. So I should use revert but lets say I want to revert the past 4 commits so I should do git revert comit1; git push; git revert comit2; git push; ... or simply git revert commit4; git push? – nacho4d Apr 28 '11 at 10:06
  • 1
    @nacho4d: you don't need to push after each revert - there's a nice description of what to do in this answer from Jakub Narębski. You do need to revert each commit going backwards - just doing git revert commit4 creates a new commit that only undoes the changes that were introduced in commit4. As the answer I linked to points out, though, you can roll these into a single commit. – Mark Longair Apr 28 '11 at 10:34
  • 1
    @Mark I have already run git reset --hard but I have deleted my local and pulled from origin again so I am able to do git revert ... My doubt now is: do I have to revert each commit and push (one by one) or just revert the first commit after the right commit only? – nacho4d Apr 28 '11 at 10:38
  • 1
    @sehe: it's difficult to use because you need to use the full ref name, and so it's easy for people to litter their .git directory with refs that they didn't mean to create. I was wrong to say that there are no safety checks, though. You can find the classification into "plumbing" and "porcelain" commands in the git man page. – Mark Longair Apr 28 '11 at 10:55
97

Use the other answers if you don't mind losing local changes. This method can still wreck your remote if you choose the wrong commit hash to go back to.

If you just want to make the remote match a commit that's already in your local branch:

  1. Do not do any resetting.
  2. Use git log to find the hash of the commit you want to the remote to be at. git log -p to see changes, or git log --graph --all --oneline --decorate to see a compact tree. (Having that last one as an alias in your shell is very handy.)
  3. Copy the hash.
  4. Run a command like:

    git push --force <remote> <the-hash>:<the remote branch>
    

    e.g.

    git push --force origin 606fdfaa33af1844c86f4267a136d4666e576cdc:master
    
  • 2
    The graph was a very nice tip, I just added -5 to get only the last n commits, it was a huge tree else. Also avoiding the reset is just what I was looking for. Great – AlexanderD Dec 12 '17 at 11:11
  • @AlexanderD You can also add the alias to Git rather than your shell, so it works everywhere. Git understands those aliases and tab-completes from the full command so you can add arguments. git config --global alias.graph 'log --graph --all --decorate --oneline' is less messy and you can still limit it, e.g.: git graph -5 – Walf Dec 13 '17 at 2:43
  • This is perfect. I have always mess up my local. This was exactly what I needed after accidently pushing my staging to live :( Thanks! – Jake Feb 23 '18 at 21:52
  • On Windows, enter q to exit the git log. 2 minutes i'll never get back. – dst3p Jan 17 at 21:50
  • 1
    @dst3p That's on every platform, mate. The pager program is usually less and q is the normal way to exit it. Git Bash is like a *nix terminal. – Walf Jan 18 at 1:16
56

I solved problem like yours by this commands:

git reset --hard <commit-hash> 
git push -f <remote> <local branch>:<remote branch> 
9

On GitLab, you may have to set your branch to unprotected before doing this. You can do this in [repo] > Settings > Repository > Protected Branches. Then the method from Mark's answer works.

git reset --hard <commit-hash>
git push -f origin master
6

My two cents to the previous answers: if

git push --force <remote> <the-hash>:<the remote branch>

still doesn't work, you might want to edit <your-remote-repo>.git/config file's receive section:

[receive]
  #denyNonFastforwards = true
  denyNonFastforwards = false
5

If you want a previous version of file, I would recommend using git checkout.

git checkout <commit-hash>

Doing this will send you back in time, it does not affect the current state of your project, you can come to mainline git checkout mainline

but when you add a file in the argument, that file is brought back to you from a previous time to your current project time, i.e. your current project is changed and needs to be committed.

git checkout <commit-hash> -- file_name
git add .
git commit -m 'file brought from previous time'
git push

The advantage of this is that it does not delete history, and neither does revert a particular code changes (git revert)

Check more here https://www.atlassian.com/git/tutorials/undoing-changes#git-checkout

1

If your branch is not development or production, the easiest way to achieve this is resetting to a certain commit locally and create a new branch from there. You can use:

git checkout 000000

(where 000000 is the commit id where you want to go) in your problematic branch and then simply create a new branch:

git remote add [name_of_your_remote]

Then you can create a new PR and all will work fine!

0

Do one thing, get the commit's SHA no. such as 87c9808 and then,

  1. move yourself ,that is your head to the specified commit (by doing git reset --hard 89cef43//mention your number here )
  2. Next do some changes in a random file , so that the git will ask you to commit that locally and then remotely Thus, what you need to do now is. after applying change git commit -a -m "trial commit"
  3. Now push the following commit (if this has been committed locally) by git push origin master
  4. Now what git will ask from you is that

error: failed to push some refs to 'https://github.com/YOURREPOSITORY/AndroidExperiments.git' hint: Updates were rejected because the tip of your current branch is behind hint: its remote counterpart. Integrate the remote changes (e.g. hint: 'git pull ...') before pushing again.**

  1. Thus now what you can do is

git push --force origin master

  1. And thus, i hope it works :)
-2

Learn section: Undo Public Commits with Revert on Atlasssian Blog https://www.atlassian.com/git/tutorials/resetting-checking-out-and-reverting

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