0

I'm trying to create a pseudo-interface in typescript. The desired behavior would look something like this:

I'd like to create a type containing any number of action groups which contain any number of actions

type MyActionInterface = { 
    ActionGroup1: { 
        Action1: () => number, 
        Action2: (x:number) => string 
    },
    ActionGroup2: {
        Action1: (x: number, y:number) => void, 
        Action2: (x:string) => number
    }
}

Which can then be used to describe my concrete implementation object

const someInterfacedObject:ActionInterface<MyActionInterface> = {
    ActionGroup1: [
        {
            name: 'Action1',
            call: () => 3
        },
        {
            name: 'Action2',
            call: (x) => "X"+x
        }
    ],
    ActionGroup2: [
        {
            name: 'Action1',
            call: (x, y) => { }
        },
        {
            name: 'Action2',
            call: (x) => 3
        }
    ]
}

The code currently looks like this and works somewhat

type ValueOf<T> = T[keyof T];
type AnyFunction = (...args:any) => any

type Action<N, F> = {
    name: N
    call: F
}   

type ActionInterface<Definition> = 
{ 
    [groupname in keyof Definition] : Action<keyof Definition[groupname], ValueOf<Definition[groupname]>>[]
}

Now the type of, for example, ActionGroup1 in someInterfacedObject resolves as

ActionGroup1: Action<"Action1" | "Action2", (() => number) | ((x: number) => string)>[]

which does still allow me to omit actions or input undesired combinations of name/function

I'd like to get typescript to resolve ActionGroup1 as

[Action<"Action1", () => number>, Action<"Action2", (x:number) => string>]

Is this possible?

0

If you want to require that the name and the call properties match up (so you can't use "undesired combinations of name/function"), you can do it like this:

type ActionInterfaceArray<T> = {
  [K in keyof T]: Array<
    { [P in keyof T[K]]: { name: P; call: T[K][P] } }[keyof T[K]]
  >
};

Basically you're iterating over all the subproperties P of each property K of T and then unioning together the {name: P; call: T[K][P]}. So you end up with Array<{name: "Action1", call: ()=>number} | {name: "Action2", call: (x: number)=>string}>.

For ActionInterfaceArray<MyActionInterface>, you get

{
    ActionGroup1: ({
        name: "Action1";
        call: () => number;
    } | {
        name: "Action2";
        call: (x: number) => string;
    })[];
    ActionGroup2: ({
        name: "Action1";
        call: (x: number, y: number) => void;
    } | {
        name: "Action2";
        call: (x: string) => number;
    })[];
}

This is the simplest approach, by far.


Unfortunately it doesn't solve the "allow me to omit actions" problem. You can't really output a tuple type like [{name: "Action1", call: ()=>number}, {name: "Action2", call: (x: number)=>string}], since the original ActionGroup1 is an object type, and object types don't have ordered keys. So nothing in the language will say "place Action1 first and Action2 second", and that's not even what you're trying to do, is it?

You could potentially represent a union of all possible tuple types, such as [{name: "Action1", call: ()=>number}, {name: "Action2", call: (x: number)=>string}] | [{name: "Action2", call: (x: number)=>string}, {name: "Action1", call: ()=>number}], but this is both a real pain to generate programmatically and results in an unmanageable combinatorial explosion of tuples for even a modest number of terms. (e.g., turning Array<A | B | C | D> into [A, B, C, D] | [A, B, D, C] | [A, C, B, D] | [A, C, D, B] | [A, D, B, C] | [A, D, C, B] | [B, A, C, D] | [B, A, D, C] | [B, C, A, D] | [B, C, D, A] | [B, D, A, C] | [B, D, C, A] | [C, A, B, D] | [C, A, D, B] | [C, B, A, D] | [C, B, D, A] | [C, D, A, B] | [C, D, B, A] | [D, A, B, C] | [D, A, C, B] | [D, B, A, C] | [D, B, C, A] | [D, C, A, B] | [D, C, B, A]) I wouldn't recommend this, but here's one way to get close (The natural implementation of UnionToAllPossibleTuples<T> is recursive in a way the TypeScript compiler doesn't like, so I've unrolled it into something that will deal with unions of up to seven members):

type UnionToAllPossibleTuples<T> = UTAPT<T>;
type UTAPT<T, U = T> = [T] extends [never] ? [] : T extends any ? Cons<T, UTAPT1<Exclude<U, T>>> : never;
type UTAPT1<T, U = T> = [T] extends [never] ? [] : T extends any ? Cons<T, UTAPT2<Exclude<U, T>>> : never;
type UTAPT2<T, U = T> = [T] extends [never] ? [] : T extends any ? Cons<T, UTAPT3<Exclude<U, T>>> : never;
type UTAPT3<T, U = T> = [T] extends [never] ? [] : T extends any ? Cons<T, UTAPT4<Exclude<U, T>>> : never;
type UTAPT4<T, U = T> = [T] extends [never] ? [] : T extends any ? Cons<T, UTAPT5<Exclude<U, T>>> : never;
type UTAPT5<T, U = T> = [T] extends [never] ? [] : T extends any ? Cons<T, UTAPT6<Exclude<U, T>>> : never;
type UTAPT6<T, U = T> = [T] extends [never] ? [] : T extends any ? Cons<T, UTAPT7<Exclude<U, T>>> : never;
type UTAPT7<T, U = T> = [];

type Cons<T, U = []> = U extends any[]
  ? ((t: T, ...u: U) => void) extends ((...r: infer R) => void) ? R : never
  : [T];

and then

type ActionInterfaceTuples<T> = {
  [K in keyof T]: UnionToAllPossibleTuples<
    { [P in keyof T[K]]: { name: P; call: T[K][P] } }[keyof T[K]]
  >
};

For ActionInterfaceTuples<MyActionInterface>, you get:

{
    ActionGroup1: [{
        name: "Action1";
        call: () => number;
    }, {
        name: "Action2";
        call: (x: number) => string;
    }] | [{
        name: "Action2";
        call: (x: number) => string;
    }, {
        name: "Action1";
        call: () => number;
    }];
    ActionGroup2: [{
       name: "Action1";
        call: (x: number, y: number) => void;
    }, {
        name: "Action2";
        call: (x: string) => number;
    }] | [{
        name: "Action2";
        call: (x: string) => number;
    }, {
        name: "Action1";
        call: (x: number, y: number) => void;
    }];
}

which works well enough here, but... yuck.


Another thing you could do is make a generic type ActionInterfaceGeneric<T, U> that tries to verify that a candidate type U has all the required properties corresponding to the subproperties of T. It's based on ActionInterfaceArray<T>, but if any of the passed in arrays are missing keys (keyof T[K] extends U[K][number]["name"] is false), then you will make the type require the missing key. The errors aren't great, and it's hard to read, but here it is:

type ActionInterfaceGeneric<T, U extends ActionInterfaceArray<T>> = {
  [K in keyof T]: keyof T[K] extends U[K][number]["name"]
    ? U[K]
    : [{ name: Exclude<keyof T[K], U[K][number]["name"]>; call: any }]
};

const asActionInterface = <T>() => <
  U extends ActionInterfaceArray<T> & ActionInterfaceGeneric<T, U>
>(
  u: U
) => u;

That will work for your correct value:

const someInterfacedObject = asActionInterface<MyActionInterface>()({
  ActionGroup1: [
    {
      name: "Action1",
      call: () => 3
    },
    {
      name: "Action2",
      call: x => "X" + x
    }
  ],
  ActionGroup2: [
    {
      name: "Action1",
      call: (x, y) => {}
    },
    {
      name: "Action2",
      call: () => 3
    }
  ]
});

but for an incorrect value you'll get some errors:

const badInterfacedObject = asActionInterface<MyActionInterface>()({
  ActionGroup1: [
    {
      name: "Action1",
      call: () => 3
    },
    {
      name: "Action2",
      call: x => "X" + x
    }
  ],
  ActionGroup2: [    
    {
      name: "Action2",  // error! '"Action2"' is not assignable to type '"Action1"'.
      call: () => 3
    }
  ]
});

That error, "Action2" is not assignable to "Action1" is a bit confusing, especially since if you change it to "Action1" it will switch the error to "Action2". Really you want the error to say something like "hey your array isn't long enough", but it's hard to get custom error messages. The above is close enough to demonstrate the general approach.


So, both ActionInterfaceGeneric and ActionInterfaceTuples are complicated in their own ways, and ActionInterfaceArray is incomplete... these problems indicate that TypeScript's type system isn't really quite geared for this sort of thing. If you wanted to play nicely with TypeScript, I'd suggest ditching arrays-which-need-to-exactly-match-objects and just use the objects themselves. This might not be feasible for you, of course. If so, I'd probably just go with ActionInterfaceArray and use some prominent documentation that care must be taken when using it. But it's up to you which (if any) of these to use.

Okay, hope that helps; good luck!

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