43

I have a page with a lot of GIFs.

<img src="gif/1303552574110.1.gif" alt="" >
<img src="gif/1302919192204.gif" alt="" >
<img src="gif/1303642234740.gif" alt="" >
<img src="gif/1303822879528.gif" alt="" >
<img src="gif/1303825584512.gif" alt="" >

What I'm looking for

1 On page load => Animations for all gifs are stopped

2 On mouseover => Animations starts for that one gif

3 On mouseout => Animation stops again for that gif

I suppose this can be done in Jquery but I don't know how.

13 Answers 13

61

No, you can't control the animation of the images.

You would need two versions of each image, one that is animated, and one that's not. On hover you can easily change from one image to another.

Example:

$(function(){
  $('img').each(function(e){
    var src = $(e).attr('src');
    $(e).hover(function(){
      $(this).attr('src', src.replace('.gif', '_anim.gif'));
    }, function(){
      $(this).attr('src', src);
    });
  });
});

Update:

Time goes by, and possibilities change. As kritzikatzi pointed out, having two versions of the image is not the only option, you can apparently use a canvas element to create a copy of the first frame of the animation. Note that this doesn't work in all browsers, IE 8 for example doesn't support the canvas element.

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    this answer has become only partially true. now you can uses the canvas tag to create a still image from the first frame of the gif (that's how the freezeframe plugin does it). obviously having two version can potentially save you a lot of bandwidth, just saying it's not the only option. – kritzikratzi Jun 28 '14 at 19:22
  • 5
    @kritzikratzi: Note that the canvas trick only works for images from the same domain as the page itself. Images that are loaded from elsewhere can't be captured by a Canvas. – peterflynn Sep 17 '14 at 23:24
  • 4
    Why the downvote? If you don't explain what it is that you think is wrong, it can't improve the answer. – Guffa Sep 29 '14 at 16:50
  • 1
    upvoted because this is a good solution and you have continued to update it despite people down voting you for an answer that was simply 3 years old, not wrong in the first place. Thanks, this helped. – ReganPerkins May 27 '15 at 19:20
  • 1
    @TheDembinski: Yes, that would be a better solution in some cases, it all depends on how many images you have and how much data you are willing to preload. If you switch elements on hover you can even do it using only CSS. – Guffa Jul 13 '16 at 12:45
18

I realise this answer is late, but I found a rather simple, elegant, and effective solution to this problem and felt it necessary to post it here.

However one thing I feel I need to make clear is that this doesn't start gif animation on mouseover, pause it on mouseout, and continue it when you mouseover it again. That, unfortunately, is impossible to do with gifs. (It is possible to do with a string of images displayed one after another to look like a gif, but taking apart every frame of your gifs and copying all those urls into a script would be time consuming)

What my solution does is make an image looks like it starts moving on mouseover. You make the first frame of your gif an image and put that image on the webpage then replace the image with the gif on mouseover and it looks like it starts moving. It resets on mouseout.

Just insert this script in the head section of your HTML:

$(document).ready(function()
{
    $("#imgAnimate").hover(
        function()
        {
            $(this).attr("src", "GIF URL HERE");
        },
        function()
        {
            $(this).attr("src", "STATIC IMAGE URL HERE");
        });
});

And put this code in the img tag of the image you want to animate.

id="imgAnimate"

This will load the gif on mouseover, so it will seem like your image starts moving. (This is better than loading the gif onload because then the transition from static image to gif is choppy because the gif will start on a random frame)

for more than one image just recreate the script create a function:

<script type="text/javascript">

var staticGifSuffix = "-static.gif";
var gifSuffix = ".gif";

$(document).ready(function() {

  $(".img-animate").each(function () {

     $(this).hover(
        function()
        {
            var originalSrc = $(this).attr("src");
            $(this).attr("src", originalSrc.replace(staticGifSuffix, gifSuffix));
        },
        function()
        {
            var originalSrc = $(this).attr("src");
            $(this).attr("src", originalSrc.replace(gifSuffix, staticGifSuffix));  
        }
     );

  });

});
</script>

</head>
<body>

<img class="img-animate" src="example-static.gif" >
<img class="img-animate" src="example-static.gif" >
<img class="img-animate" src="example-static.gif" >
<img class="img-animate" src="example-static.gif" >
<img class="img-animate" src="example-static.gif" >

</body>

That code block is a functioning web page (based on the information you have given me) that will display the static images and on hover, load and display the gif's. All you have to do is insert the url's for the static images.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This works well for me. The other solutions didn't work for me. – Paul Jan 18 '13 at 9:14
  • Thanks, I try =p I updated this answer with a lot of things I missed the first time around. (also fixed one error where I forgot to change the name of an ID from what it was in my version of the script) – Mark Kramer Mar 25 '13 at 21:23
  • No, thank you! Here is where I implemented this technique: new.syntheticmedia.net Hover over the logo and the nav menu items. – Paul Mar 29 '13 at 7:34
  • That is absolutely terrible code. You should never just duplicate the code like that; instead search the DOM for images: $("img").each(function () { $(this).hover(function () { ... }) }); and use a naming convention – Honest Objections Nov 23 '17 at 6:32
8

I think the jQuery plugin freezeframe.js might come in handy for you. freezeframe.js is a jQuery Plugin To Automatically Pause GIFs And Restart Animating On Mouse Hover.

I guess you can easily adapt it to make it work on page load instead.

| improve this answer | |
  • This solution is probably more robust, it uses the canvas element for part of the work, but it adds a lot of overhead to overall basic requirement asked by the OP. – Mike Kormendy Nov 15 '14 at 16:18
  • Unfortunately both the link here and @tabacitu's link don't appear to work any longer. It looks like the plugin is available on gitHub: github.com/chrisantonellis/freezeframe.js – indextwo Jul 30 '15 at 16:03
5

The best option is probably to have a still image which you replace the gif with when you want to stop it.

<img src="gif/1303552574110.1.gif" alt="" class="anim" >
<img src="gif/1302919192204.gif" alt="" class="anim" >
<img src="gif/1303642234740.gif" alt="" class="anim" >
<img src="gif/1303822879528.gif" alt="" class="anim" >
<img src="gif/1303825584512.gif" alt="" class="anim" >

$(window).load(function() {
  $(".anim").src("stillimage.gif");
});

$(".anim").mouseover(function {
  $(this).src("animatedimage.gif");
});

$(".anim").mouseout(function {
  $(this).src("stillimage.gif");
});

You probably want to have two arrays containing paths to the still and animated gifs which you can assign to each image.

| improve this answer | |
2

You can solve this by having a long stripe that you show in steps, like a filmstrip. Then you can stop the film on any frame. Example below (fiddle available at http://jsfiddle.net/HPXq4/9/):

the markup:

 <div class="thumbnail-wrapper">
     <img src="blah.jpg">
 </div>

the css:

.thumbnail-wrapper{
   width:190px;
   height:100px;
   overflow:hidden;
   position:absolute;
}
.thumbnail-wrapper img{
   position:relative;
   top:0;
}

the js:

var gifTimer;
var currentGifId=null;
var step = 100; //height of a thumbnail
$('.thumbnail-wrapper img').hover(
   function(){
      currentGifId = $(this)
      gifTimer = setInterval(playGif,500);
   },
   function(){
       clearInterval(gifTimer);
       currentGifId=null;
   }
);

var playGif = function(){
   var top = parseInt(currentGifId.css('top'))-step;
   var max = currentGifId.height();
   console.log(top,max)
   if(max+top<=0){
     console.log('reset')
     top=0;
   }
   currentGifId.css('top',top);
}

obviously, this can be optimized much further, but I simplified this example for readability

| improve this answer | |
2

found a working solution here: https://codepen.io/hoanghals/pen/dZrWLZ

JS here:

var gifElements = document.querySelectorAll('img.gif');

for(var e in gifElements) {

var element = gifElements[e];

if(element.nodeName == 'IMG') {

    var supergif = new SuperGif({
        gif: element,
        progressbar_height: 0,
        auto_play: false,
    });

    var controlElement = document.createElement("div");
    controlElement.className = "gifcontrol loading g"+e;

    supergif.load((function(controlElement) {
        controlElement.className = "gifcontrol paused";
        var playing = false;
        controlElement.addEventListener("click", function(){
            if(playing) {
                this.pause();
                playing = false;
                controlElement.className = "gifcontrol paused";
            } else {
                this.play();
                playing = true;
                controlElement.className = "gifcontrol playing";
            }
        }.bind(this, controlElement));

    }.bind(supergif))(controlElement));

    var canvas = supergif.get_canvas();     
    controlElement.style.width = canvas.width+"px";
    controlElement.style.height = canvas.height+"px";
controlElement.style.left = canvas.offsetLeft+"px";
    var containerElement = canvas.parentNode;
    containerElement.appendChild(controlElement);

 }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This works beautifully. Thanks! However, you missed one thing out. One needs the library buzzfeed / libgif-js . See below, where I've put a complete answer, rather than just the JavaScript. – Phil van Kleur Sep 23 at 17:56
1

A more elegant version of Mark Kramer's would be to do the following:

function animateImg(id, gifSrc){
  var $el = $(id),
    staticSrc = $el.attr('src');
  $el.hover(
    function(){
      $(this).attr("src", gifSrc);
    },
    function(){
      $(this).attr("src", staticSrc);
    });
}

$(document).ready(function(){
  animateImg('#id1', 'gif/gif1.gif');
  animateImg('#id2', 'gif/gif2.gif');
});

Or even better would be to use data attributes:

$(document).ready(function(){
  $('.animated-img').each(function(){
    var $el = $(this),
      staticSrc = $el.attr('src'),
      gifSrc = $el.data('gifSrc');
    $el.hover(
      function(){
        $(this).attr("src", gifSrc);
      },
      function(){
        $(this).attr("src", staticSrc);
      });
  });
});

And the img el would look something like:

<img class="animated-img" src=".../img.jpg" data-gif-src=".../gif.gif" />

Note: This code is untested but should work fine.

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1

For restarting the animation of a gif image, you can use the code:

$('#img_gif').attr('src','file.gif?' + Math.random());
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0

There is only one way from what I am aware.

Have 2 images, first a jpeg with first frame(or whatever you want) of the gif and the actual gif.

Load the page with the jpeg in place and on mouse over replace the jpeg with the gif. You can preload the gifs if you want or if they are of big size show a loading while the gif is loading and then replace the jpeg with it.

If you whant it to bi linear as in have the gif play on mouse over, stop it on mouse out and then resume play from the frame you stopped, then this cannot be done with javascript+gif combo.

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0

Adding a suffix like this:

$('#img_gif').attr('src','file.gif?' + Math.random());  

the browser is compelled to download a new image every time the user accesses the page. Moreover the client cache may be quickly filled.

Here follows the alternative solution I tested on Chrome 49 and Firefox 45.
In the css stylesheet set the display property as 'none', like this:

#img_gif{
  display:'none';
}

Outside the '$(document).ready' statement insert:

$(window).load(function(){ $('#img_gif').show(); });

Every time the user accesses the page, the animation will be started after the complete load of all the elements. This is the only way I found to sincronize gif and html5 animations.

Please note that:
The gif animation will not restart after refreshing the page (like pressing "F5").
The "$(document).ready" statement doesn't produce the same effect of "$(window).load".
The property "visibility" doesn't produce the same effect of "display".

| improve this answer | |
0

Related answer, you can specify the number of playbacks on a gif. The below gif has 3 playbacks associated with it (10 second timer, 30 second playback total). After 30 seconds have passed since page load, it stops at "0:01".

Refresh the page to restart all 3 playbacks

You have to modify the gif itself. An easy tool is found here for modifying GIF playbacks https://ezgif.com/loop-count.

To see an example of a single-loop playback gif in action on a landing page, checkout this site using a single playback gif https://git-lfs.github.com/

enter image description here

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0

css filter can stop gif from playing in chrome

just add

filter: blur(0.001px);

to your img tag then gif freezed to load via chrome performance concern :)

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0

This answer builds on that of Sourabh, who pointed out an HTML/CSS/JavaScript combo at https://codepen.io/hoanghals/pen/dZrWLZ that did the job. I tried this, and made a complete web page including the CSS and JavaScript, which I tried on my site. As CodePens have a habit of disappearing, I decided to show it here. I'm also showing a simplified stripped-to-essentials version, to demonstrate the minimum that one needs to do.

I must also note one thing. The code at the above link, whose JavaScript Sourabh copies, refers to a JavaScript constructor SuperGif() . I don't think Sourabh explained that, and neither does the CodePen. An easy search showed that it's defined in buzzfeed / libgif-js , which can be downloaded from https://github.com/buzzfeed/libgif-js#readme . Look for the control that the red arrow below is pointing at, then click on the green "Code" button. (N.B. You won't see the red arrow: that's me showing you where to look.)

Screenshot of GitHub page for buzzfeed/libgif-js

A menu will pop up offering various options including to download a zip file. Download it, and extract it into your HTML directory or a subdirectory thereof.

Next, I'm going to show the two pages that I made. The first is derived from the CodePen. The second is stripped to its essentials, and shows the minimum you need in order to use SuperGif.

So here's the complete HTML, CSS, and JavaScript for the first page. In the head of the HTML is a link to libgif.js , which is the file you need from the zip file. Then, the body of the HTML starts with some text about cat pictures, and follows it with a link to an animated cat GIF at https://media.giphy.com/media/Byana3FscAMGQ/giphy.gif .

It then continues with some CSS. The CodePen uses SCSS, which for anyone who doesn't know, has to be preprocessed into CSS. I've done that, so what's in the code below is genuine CSS.

Finally, there's the JavaScript.

<html>
<head>
<script src="libgif-js-master/libgif.js"></script> 
</head>

<body>

<div style="width: 600px; margin: auto; text-align: center; font-family: arial">
  <p>
And so, the unwritten law of the internet, that any 
experiment involving video/images must involve cats in 
one way or another, reared its head again. When would 
the internet's fascination with cats come to an end? 
Never. The answer is "Never".
</p> 
  <img src='https://media.giphy.com/media/Byana3FscAMGQ/giphy.gif' class='gif' />
</div>

<style>
img.gif {
  visibility: hidden;
}

.jsgif {
  position: relative;
}

.gifcontrol {
  position: absolute;
  top: 0px;
  left: 0px;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  cursor: pointer;
  transition: background 0.25s ease-in-out;
  z-index: 100;
}
.gifcontrol:after {
  transition: background 0.25s ease-in-out;
  position: absolute;
  content: "";
  display: block;
  left: calc(50% - 25px);
  top: calc(50% - 25px);
}
.gifcontrol.loading {
  background: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.75);
}
.gifcontrol.loading:after {
  background: #FF9900;
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  border-radius: 50px;
}
.gifcontrol.playing {
  /* Only show the 'stop' button on hover */
}
.gifcontrol.playing:after {
  opacity: 0;
  transition: opacity 0.25s ease-in-out;
  border-left: 20px solid #FF9900;
  border-right: 20px solid #FF9900;
  width: 50px;
  height: 50px;
  box-sizing: border-box;
}
.gifcontrol.playing:hover:after {
  opacity: 1;
}
.gifcontrol.paused {
  background: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.5);
}
.gifcontrol.paused:after {
  width: 0;
  height: 0;
  border-style: solid;
  border-width: 25px 0 25px 50px;
  border-color: transparent transparent transparent #ff9900;
}
</style>

<script>
var gifElements = document.querySelectorAll('img.gif');

for(var e in gifElements) {
  
    var element = gifElements[e];
    
    if(element.nodeName == 'IMG') {
    
        var supergif = new SuperGif({
            gif: element,
            progressbar_height: 0,
            auto_play: false,
        });

        var controlElement = document.createElement("div");
        controlElement.className = "gifcontrol loading g"+e;

        supergif.load((function(controlElement) {
            controlElement.className = "gifcontrol paused";
            var playing = false;
            controlElement.addEventListener("click", function(){
                if(playing) {
                    this.pause();
                    playing = false;
                    controlElement.className = "gifcontrol paused";
                } else {
                    this.play();
                    playing = true;
                    controlElement.className = "gifcontrol playing";
                }
            }.bind(this, controlElement));
        
        }.bind(supergif))(controlElement));
    
        var canvas = supergif.get_canvas();     
        controlElement.style.width = canvas.width+"px";
        controlElement.style.height = canvas.height+"px";
    controlElement.style.left = canvas.offsetLeft+"px";
        var containerElement = canvas.parentNode;
        containerElement.appendChild(controlElement);
    
  }
}
</script>

</body>
</html>

When I put the page on my website and displayed it, the top looked like this:

Web page with paused animated GIF of cat

And when I pressed the pink button, the page changed to this, and the GIF started animating. (The cat laps water falling from a tap.)

Web page with running animated GIF of cat

To end, here's the second, simple, page. Unlike the first, this doesn't have a fancy Play/Pause control that changes shape: it just has two buttons. The only thing the code does that isn't essential is to disable whichever button is not relevant, and to insert some space between the buttons.

<html>

<head>
<script src="libgif-js-master/libgif.js"></script>
</head>

<body>

<button type="button" onclick="play()"
        id="play_button"
        style="margin-right:9px;"
>
Play
</button>
      
<button type="button" onclick="pause()"
        id="pause_button"
>
Pause
</button>

<img src="https://media.giphy.com/media/Byana3FscAMGQ/giphy.gif" 
     id="gif" 
/>

<script>
var gif_element = document.getElementById( "gif" );
    
var supergif = new SuperGif( {
             gif: gif_element,
                          progressbar_height: 0,
                          auto_play: false
               } );

supergif.load();

function play()
{
  var play_button = document.getElementById( "play_button" );
  play_button.disabled = true;

  var pause_button = document.getElementById( "pause_button" );
  pause_button.disabled = false;
 
  supergif.play();
}

function pause()
{
  var play_button = document.getElementById( "play_button" );
  play_button.disabled = false;

  var pause_button = document.getElementById( "pause_button" );
  pause_button.disabled = true;

  supergif.pause();
}

pause_button.disabled = true;
</script>

</body>
</html>

This, plus the example.html file in libgif-js, should be enough to get anyone started.

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