15

I have a table like as shown below

enter image description here

I would like to create two new binary columns indicating whether the subject had steroids and aspirin. I am looking to implement this in Postgresql and google bigquery

I tried the below but it doesn't work

select subject_id
case when lower(drug) like ('%cortisol%','%cortisone%','%dexamethasone%') 
then 1 else 0 end as steroids,
case when lower(drug) like ('%peptide%','%paracetamol%') 
then 1 else 0 end as aspirin,
from db.Team01.Table_1


SELECT 
db.Team01.Table_1.drug
FROM `table_1`,
UNNEST(table_1.drug) drug
WHERE REGEXP_CONTAINS( db.Team01.Table_1.drug,r'%cortisol%','%cortisone%','%dexamethasone%')

I expect my output to be like as shown below

enter image description here

0

6 Answers 6

16

Below is for BigQuery Standard SQL

#standardSQL
SELECT 
  subject_id,
  SUM(CASE WHEN REGEXP_CONTAINS(LOWER(drug), r'cortisol|cortisone|dexamethasone') THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS steroids,
  SUM(CASE WHEN REGEXP_CONTAINS(LOWER(drug), r'peptide|paracetamol') THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS aspirin
FROM `db.Team01.Table_1`
GROUP BY subject_id   

if to apply to sample data from your question - result is

Row subject_id  steroids    aspirin  
1   1           3           1    
2   2           1           1     

Note: instead of simple LIKE ending with lengthy and redundant text - I am using LIKE on steroids - which is REGEXP_CONTAINS

0
4

In Postgres, I would recommend using the filter clause:

select subject_id,
       count(*) filter (where lower(drug) ~ 'cortisol|cortisone|dexamethasone') as steroids,
       count(*) filter (where lower(drug) ~ 'peptide|paracetamol') as aspirin,
from db.Team01.Table_1
group by subject_id;

In BigQuery, I would recommend countif():

select subject_id,
       countif(regexp_contains(drug, 'cortisol|cortisone|dexamethasone') as steroids,
       countif(drug ~ ' 'peptide|paracetamol') as aspirin,
from db.Team01.Table_1
group by subject_id;

You can use sum(case when . . . end) as a more general approach. However, each database has a more "local" way of expressing this logic. By the way, the FILTER clause is standard SQL, just not widely adopted.

3
  • 'countif()' is an aggregation function,and its more resource consuming. and it seems this code wont work countif(drug ~ ' 'peptide|paracetamol')
    – Ed Bangga
    Oct 4, 2019 at 3:24
  • @Gordon Linoff, can you help me with using % symbol in your statement? where regexp_contains(drug,'(?i)dexamethasone'|'(?i)cortisone'|'(?i)cortisol') -- This looks for string presence in the drug` column. But what if I like to find whether items that ends with %sone or starts with corti exist ALONG WITH THE CONTAINS CONDITION. Is it something like this WHERE LOWER(CAST(DRUG AS BYTES)) LIKE b'corti%' OR LOWER(CAST(DRUG AS BYTES)) LIKE b'%sone' OR regexp_contains(drug,'(?i)dexamethasone'|'(?i)cortisone'|'(?i)cortisol')
    – The Great
    Oct 4, 2019 at 3:53
  • @SSMK . . . % is not needed, in either database. Perhaps you should ask another question, if you want to specifically use like for this. Oct 4, 2019 at 4:16
4

I've not used BigQuery but have been reading the docs researching it. I came across this while looking into impact of choosing collation at design stage.

I'm either wrong or this is a new feature since answers above.

CONTAINS_SUBSTR

https://cloud.google.com/bigquery/docs/reference/standard-sql/string_functions#contains_substr

Performs a normalized, case-insensitive search to see if a value exists as a substring in an expression. Returns TRUE if the value exists, otherwise returns FALSE.

Before values are compared, they are normalized and case folded with NFKC normalization. Wildcard searches are not supported.

1

Use conditional aggregation. This is a solution that works across most (if not all) RDBMS:

SELECT
    subject_id,
    MAX(CASE WHEN drug IN ('cortisol', 'cortisone', 'dexamethasone') THEN 1 END) steroids,
    MAX(CASE WHEN drug IN ('peptide', 'paracetamol') THEN 1 END) aspirin
FROM db.Team01.Table_1.drug
GROUP BY subject_id

NB: it is unclear why you are using LIKE, since it seems like you are having exact matches; I turned the LIKE condition to equalities.

3
  • But no, steroid is a column that I have to create. I have to use the values like cortisol,cortsione etc. If you check my query in post, you will get an idea
    – The Great
    Oct 2, 2019 at 8:31
  • Do you know what doesn't it work with Like operator? Does it support only IN clause in case when
    – The Great
    Oct 2, 2019 at 8:39
  • I think IN should be supported. If not, you can switch to ORed equalities, like; ` drug = 'peptide' OR drug = 'paracetamol'`.
    – GMB
    Oct 2, 2019 at 8:46
1

you have missing group-by

select subject_id,
    sum(case when lower(drug) in ('cortisol','cortisone','dexamethasone')
       then 1 else 0 end) as steroids,
    sum(case when lower(drug) in ('peptide','paracetamol') 
       then 1 else 0 end) as aspirin
from db.Team01.Table_1
group by subject_id

using like keyword

select subject_id,
 sum(case when lower(drug) like '%cortisol%'
        or lower(drug) like '%cortisone%'
        or lower(drug) like '%dexamethasone%'   
    then 1 else 0 end) as steroids,
    sum(case when lower(drug) like '%peptide%'
        or lower(drug) like '%paracetamol%'
    then 1 else 0 end) as aspirin
from db.Team01.Table_1
group by subject_id
7
  • i used sum() because i think, this is what your trying to achieve
    – Ed Bangga
    Oct 2, 2019 at 8:32
  • I encounter this error No matching signature for operator LIKE for argument types: STRING, STRUCT. Supported signatures: STRING LIKE STRING; BYTES LIKE BYTES at [2:19]
    – The Great
    Oct 2, 2019 at 8:34
  • Okay, so it doesn't support Like operatir?
    – The Great
    Oct 2, 2019 at 8:44
  • added using like operator
    – Ed Bangga
    Oct 2, 2019 at 8:45
  • try also lower(drug) similar to '%(cortisol|cortisone|dexamethasone)%'
    – Ed Bangga
    Oct 2, 2019 at 8:55
1

Another potentially more intutive solution would be to use the BigQuery Contains_Substr to return boolean results.

1

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