1

I have table where is different cities and values. I want to find gaps by cities so I have table:

City    Value
Helsinki 1
Helsinki 2
Helsinki 5
Kuopio   4
Kuopio   5
Joensuu  1
Joensuu  2
Joensuu  3

And I want to get table where is gaps by cities so

 City     Value
 Helsinki 3
 Helsinki 4
 Kuopio   1
 Kuopio   2
 Kuopio   3
 Joensuu  4
 Joensuu  5

I know that I can use conncet by

select  rownum from dual connect by level<= 6 minus select value from table

but I don't know, how I can do this by group.

2

You can use a partitioned outer join which will be more efficient than using a self-join and a CROSS JOIN:

Oracle Setup:

CREATE TABLE table_name ( City, Value ) AS
SELECT 'Helsinki', 1 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
SELECT 'Helsinki', 2 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
SELECT 'Helsinki', 5 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
SELECT 'Kuopio',   4 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
SELECT 'Kuopio',   5 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
SELECT 'Joensuu',  1 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
SELECT 'Joensuu',  2 FROM DUAL UNION ALL
SELECT 'Joensuu',  3 FROM DUAL

Query:

SELECT city,
       v.value
FROM   ( SELECT LEVEL AS value
         FROM   DUAL
         CONNECT BY LEVEL <= ( SELECT MAX( value ) FROM table_name )
                             -- or just 5 if you want a static value
       ) v
       LEFT OUTER JOIN table_name t
       PARTITION BY ( t.City )
       ON ( v.value = t.value )
WHERE  t.value IS NULL

Output:

CITY     | VALUE
:------- | ----:
Helsinki |     3
Helsinki |     4
Joensuu  |     4
Joensuu  |     5
Kuopio   |     1
Kuopio   |     2
Kuopio   |     3

db<>fiddle here

| improve this answer | |
1

You can CROSS JOIN the list of distinct cities with the possible values (1 to 5), and then use a LEFT JOIN antipattern to identify the missing values:

SELECT c.city, v.value
FROM 
    (SELECT DISTINCT city FROM mytable) c
    CROSS JOIN (SELECT rownum value FROM DUAL CONNECT BY level<= 5) v
    LEFT JOIN mytable t ON t.city = c.city AND t.value = v.value
WHERE t.city IS NULL
ORDER BY c.city, v.value

Demo on DB Fiddle:

CITY     | VALUE
:------- | ----:
Helsinki |     3
Helsinki |     4
Joensuu  |     4
Joensuu  |     5
Kuopio   |     1
Kuopio   |     2
Kuopio   |     3

NB: another option to generate the list of values is, instead of generating a fixed list of numbers, to start from the distinct values available in the table (this implies that all possible values are available in the table):

CROSS JOIN (SELECT DISTINCT values FROM mytable) v
| improve this answer | |
  • CROSS JOIN on the DISTINCT values will not work if every group is missing a value. – MT0 Oct 3 '19 at 6:54
  • @MT0: indeed, this is why I presented this as an alternative solution... – GMB Oct 3 '19 at 6:55
1

You can achieve this using MINUS operator -- your original idea

SQL> with city as (
  2  select 'Helsinki' as name, 1 as value from dual union all
  3  select 'Helsinki' as name, 2 as value from dual union all
  4  select 'Helsinki' as name, 5 as value from dual union all
  5  select 'Kuopio' as name, 4 as value from dual union all
  6  select 'Kuopio' as name, 5 as value from dual union all
  7  select 'Joensuu' as name, 1 as value from dual union all
  8  select 'Joensuu' as name, 2 as value from dual union all
  9  select 'Joensuu' as name, 3 as value from dual
 10  )
 11  SELECT NAME, LVL
 12  FROM (SELECT DISTINCT NAME FROM CITY)
 13  JOIN (SELECT LEVEL AS LVL FROM DUAL
 14          CONNECT BY LEVEL <= 5) ON ( 1 = 1 )
 15  MINUS
 16  SELECT NAME, VALUE
 17    FROM CITY
 18  ORDER BY 1, 2;

NAME            LVL
-------- ----------
Helsinki          3
Helsinki          4
Joensuu           4
Joensuu           5
Kuopio            1
Kuopio            2
Kuopio            3

7 rows selected.

SQL>

Cheers!!

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    As the number of cities and values increases the number of duplicate rows generated by the hierarchical query will increase exponentially and then the SQL engine will have to remove them using DISTINCT (you can remove the DISTINCT clause to see the duplicates). I have a feeling that this will impose increasing performance penalties as the size of the data grows. It would be better if you could correlate the hierarchical query to the PRIOR row (or use a recursive sub-query factoring clause instead of a hierarchical query) to prevent it generating duplicate rows in the first place. – MT0 Oct 3 '19 at 7:00
  • An example using a recursive sub-query factoring clause would be db<>fiddle – MT0 Oct 3 '19 at 7:06
  • Yes, you are right MT0, but for this example it was fitting best. we can first achieve distinct city and then use connect by on it. – ORA_Dentist Oct 3 '19 at 7:10
  • See db<>fiddle for an example of how an uncorrelated hierarchical query can generate duplicate rows. The first query is uncorrelated and even after using the DISTINCT cities it will generate 363 rows. The second query correlates the hierarchical query using PRIOR (and a nasty hack I don't like using either DBMS_RANDOM or, alternatively, guids) and reduces this down to the expected 15 rows. Using MINUS (or DISTINCT) will filter the duplicates but its creating extra work for the SQL engine. – MT0 Oct 3 '19 at 7:14
  • 1
    Check the updated answer now. I have separated the logic to generate 5 values and city values – ORA_Dentist Oct 3 '19 at 7:36

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