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I have the following tables:

CREATE TABLE `students` (
    `student_id`            int NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,        
    `student_name`          varchar(40) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
    PRIMARY KEY (`student_id`)
);

CREATE TABLE `courses` (
    `course_id`             int NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,        
    `course_name`           varchar(40) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
    PRIMARY KEY (`course_id`)
);

CREATE TABLE `students_courses` (
    `id`                    int NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,        
    `student_id`            int NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
    `course_id`             int NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
    PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
);

Here, am using the students_courses table to store the relationships between the Students and Courses. Because one Student can enroll to more than one Course.

The doubt am having is, what should be indexed and how for that table.

1) Shall I index student_id and course_id separately like this:

CREATE TABLE `students_courses` (
    `id`                    int NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,        
    `student_id`            int NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
    `course_id`             int NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
    PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
    KEY (`student_id`),
    KEY (`course_id`)
);

2) Or, create a composite index for both the student_id and course_id

CREATE TABLE `students_courses` (
    `id`                    int NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,        
    `student_id`            int NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
    `course_id`             int NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
    PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
    KEY (`student_id`, `course_id`)
);

3) If going with composite key, should I remove that that id primary key and make the PRIMARY KEY composite?

I will be using this relationship table during JOIN mainly. So am a bit confused here.

  • i would always use a id int NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY no matter what as InnoDB engine ia heavy optimizated for handling this case .. As a composite key can be more "random" making the insert most likely not always happen in order annymore in the index slowing down the inserting speeds – Raymond Nijland Oct 3 at 8:53
  • @RaymondNijland, sorry didn't get you. You mean no need of indexing the other fields? Or you are talking about including the PRIMARY KEY keyword like this: id int NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY, – Vpp Man Oct 3 at 8:57
  • i mean always having a column with a AUTO_INCREMENT and a PRIMARY KEY yes ... But on the other side as KEY (student_id, course_id)` is a secondary index on InnoDB and if you join on student_id that means InnoDB has to load the PRIMARY KEY(id) from memory.disk aswell as the ROW_ID to the table is stored in there.. in a heavy write go for mine fast comment in a heavy select environment that composite key might be better.. – Raymond Nijland Oct 3 at 9:00
  • @RaymondNijland for a plain mapping (one field to another field) table, I would rather prefer the natural composite key instead. Because, you anyways would need to define a UNIQUE key for data consistency. So, the overheads during insert are going to be there even if random inserts – Madhur Bhaiya Oct 3 at 9:00
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    ... also @MadhurBhaiya ... in a heavy write environment go for the AUTO_INCREMENT in a heavy select environment that composite key should be better as using a secondary index means that InnoDB has to load the PRIMARY KEY(id) from memory/disk aswell as the ROW_ID to the table is stored in there ..Note i mean the heavy read and or write offcource to be on the students_courses table ... But this seams to be student cource data so i am assuming the reads will be more then the writes after reconsideration as i am assuming the cources are only added at the start of a year or around the finals.. – Raymond Nijland Oct 3 at 9:13
2

Let's say we stick to using the Auto Increment id column as Primary Key. Now, we will also need to ensure that the data is consistent, i.e., there are no duplicate rows for a combination of (student_id, course_id) values. So, we will need to either handle this in application code (do a select every time before insert/update), or we can fix this thing structurally by defining a Composite UNIQUE constraint on (student_id, course_id).

Now, a Primary Key is basically a UNIQUE NOT NULL Key. If you look at your table definition, this newly defined UNIQUE constraint is basically a Primary Key only (because the fields are NOT NULL as well). So, in this particular case, you don't really need to use a Surrogate Primary key id.

The difference in overheads during random DML (Insert/Update/Delete) will be minimal, as you would also have similar overheads when using a UNIQUE index only. So, you can rather define a Natural Primary Composite Key (student_id, course_id):

-- Drop the id column
ALTER TABLE students_courses DROP COLUMN id;

-- Add the composite Primary Key
ALTER TABLE students_courses ADD PRIMARY(student_id, course_id);

Above will also enforce the UNIQUE constraint on the combination of (student_id, course_id). Moreover, you will save 4 bytes per row (size of int is 4 bytes). This will come handly when you would have large tables.

Now, while Joining from students to students_courses table, above Primary Key will be a sufficient index. However, if you need to Join from courses to students_courses table, you will need another key for this purpose. So, you can define one more key on course_id as follows:

ALTER TABLE students_courses ADD INDEX (course_id);

Moreover, you should define Foreign Key constraints to ensure data integrity:

ALTER TABLE students_courses ADD FOREIGN KEY (student_id) 
                             REFERENCES students(student_id);

ALTER TABLE students_courses ADD FOREIGN KEY (course_id) 
                             REFERENCES courses(course_id);
  • @RaymondNijland but it also needs to update the UNIQUE index, right ? My point is that you anyways need to define a UNIQUE constraint. So, the overhead in updating that index tree will be on similar lines as updating this PK. – Madhur Bhaiya Oct 3 at 9:21
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    indeed, i need coffee badly it seams as i catched on way to late what you meant :-) if a UNIQUE(student_id, course_id) also is required i assume it is indeed required like you said.. Then the innodb 's AUTO_INCREMENT insert optimisation does not help much.... – Raymond Nijland Oct 3 at 9:28
  • @RaymondNijland - Agreed. The id has zero benefit, and some waste of space and speed. In the end, you need 2 indexes: PK(a,b), and INDEX(b,a). Whether you say INDEX(b) or INDEX(b,a) probably does not matter at all. – Rick James Oct 12 at 23:08
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    Fewer BTrees to update on an INSERT => less work to do. – Rick James Oct 13 at 1:36
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    Every COMMIT requires at least one disk write (and fsync). A single commit for 1000 rows saves 999 writes. – Rick James Oct 16 at 21:35

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