9

I have hyper-v enabled in windows 10. When I check the excluded ports, I get:

C:\> netsh interface ipv4 show excludedportrange protocol=tcp

Protocol tcp Port Exclusion Ranges

Start Port    End Port
----------    --------
      5357        5357
      9800        9800
      9801        9801
     49671       49770
     49871       49970
     50000       50059     *
     61117       61216
     61220       61319
     61902       62001

* - Administered port exclusions.

Why Hyper-V reserves these ports?

How Administered port exclusions ( ie, range 50000-50059 ) differ from other port exclusions?

For example, when i tried to ping to all these ports using a net.Listen() in golang, all ports except 50000-50059 returns error:

listen tcp 127.0.0.1:9801: bind: An attempt was made to access a socket in a way forbidden by its access permissions. 
3
  • 1
    Removed the Go flag as this has only tangentially to do with Go. You would run into the same problem with any language. It may well be that those ports are required for the communication of the HyperV system. In any case, you cannot use them. Choose a non-reserved port and Bob is your uncle. Oct 3 '19 at 10:07
  • That range might be blocked by Microsoft due to identified virus / malware activity. See some related articles: dandini.wordpress.com/2019/07/15/…; blog.sixthimpulse.com/2019/01/…
    – icza
    Oct 3 '19 at 10:15
  • Okay. But, why we are able to use the ports of starred Administered port exclusions range? I mean, I couldn't find an exact answer for what is 'Administered port exclusions'?
    – AnjanaDyna
    Oct 3 '19 at 11:12
14

In windows 10, sometimes we get an error for a particular port:

Ports are not available: listen tcp 0.0.0.0:55555: bind: An attempt was made to access a socket in a way forbidden by its access permissions. 

When seeing this error, our first instinct will be that somehow the port we need is being used by another application. So if we check for ports in use:

netstat -aon | find "55555"

But the result may show that the port was not already being used.

Then the problem may be that Windows reserves some ports, they are the excluded ports which we cannot use for our other purposes. We can list those ports with the command:

C:\Users\Xyz> netsh interface ipv4 show excludedportrange protocol=tcp

Protocol tcp Port Exclusion Ranges

Start Port    End Port
----------    --------
      1031        1130
      1131        1230
      1231        1330
      1331        1430
      1431        1530
      1561        1660
      2363        2462
      2463        2562
      2563        2662
      2663        2762
      2763        2862
      2863        2962
      5357        5357
     50000       50099     *
     55500       55599
 
* - Administered port exclusions.

Why windows reserves these ports?

  • Those ports might be blocked by Microsoft due to identified virus / malware activity.
  • We experienced this after a windows update. Then we installed the next update and rebooted the machine. The ranges changed this time and our ports got available.
  • Sometimes it is the enabled Hyper-V feature (we enable it for docker-for-windows installation) that does this.

There may be other reasons too.

But If we try to delete a port range exclusion with the following command (even as administrator), it will return an error saying that it doesn't have permission for this.

netsh int ipv4 delete excludedportrange protocol=tcp startport=55500 numberofports=100

If the port exclusion is introduced by Hyper-V, we have two possible solutions in the end (there may be others):

  • Change the port that we were trying to use. The new port should be something that doesn't comes under the exclusions.

  • Disable Hyper-V, reserve a port range for our use, then enable Hyper-V again.

1. Disable Hyper-V

Method 1 - Windows Features tool:

In Control Panel -> select Programs and Features -> Select 'Turn Windows features on or off' -> Uncheck the option Hyper-V -> Apply

Method 2 - Via Powershell:

Open Powershell (as admin) and run the command:

Disable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName Microsoft-Hyper-V-All

Method 3 - via command prompt:

Open Command prompt (as admin) and run the command:

dism.exe /Online /Disable-Feature:Microsoft-Hyper-V

A system reboot will be required after this.

2. Reserve the port (range) you want so hyper-v doesn't reserve it back.

After that reboot, if we try listing the port exclusions, we can see that some of ranges are not there now (especially, those the one which we want). Now reserve the port range we need:

netsh int ipv4 add excludedportrange protocol=tcp startport=55500 numberofports=100

3. Re-Enable Hyper-V

You can use the all the three methods mentioned above to enable the feature too. For example, showing one with dism:

dism.exe /Online /Enable-Feature:Microsoft-Hyper-V /All

This will also require a system reboot.

When your system is back, try listing the port exclusions again.

What happens here is that the specified port range was added to Administered port exclusions. That means we reserved it for our purposes.

After doing this, Hyper-V is smart enough to start it’s own reserved ranges around our pre-reserved ranges (notice in the result below the range from 55500–55599 is protected ) :

C:\Users\Xyz> netsh interface ipv4 show excludedportrange protocol=tcp

Protocol tcp Port Exclusion Ranges

Start Port    End Port
----------    --------
      1031        1130
      1131        1230
      1231        1330
      1331        1430
      1431        1530
      1561        1660
      2363        2462
      2463        2562
      2563        2662
      2663        2762
      2763        2862
      2863        2962
      5357        5357
     50000       50099     *
     55500       55599     *

* - Administered port exclusions.

Now you will be able to bind to a port in that range successfully.

So basically, Administered port exclusions are those exclusions that we can add to reserve some ports for our use.

1
  • I often encounter this issue when doing local debugging from Visual Studio on Win10 using Ketrel ports. This is the most detailed solution I've found; unfortunately I don't have Hyper-V enabled on my system so I still can't explain why so many ports are reserved by my system, and why they so often change.
    – k3davis
    Aug 12 at 20:47

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