4

Recently I wanted to learn Node.js to help me to find a job so I started a web scraping application.

I started with mysql package but after writing the code I didn't have in mind this is an asynchronus proccess.

Then I found mysql2 with promises but I'm not sure if I understand how to use them properly and I'm doing a bad practice.

Here is my code


const mysql = require('mysql2');

const pool = mysql.createPool({ ... });

var categorias = [];
var querySQL;

/*
Here goes web scraping stuff not needed in this question
*/

pool.getConnection(function(err, connection){

      if(err) throw err;

      querySQL = "SELECT 1 FROM Categories LIMIT 1";

      connection.promise().query(querySQL).then(([rows,fields])=> {

        if (rows!=undefined) {
          console.log("The table already exist");
        }else {

          querySQL = "CREATE TABLE Categories (id INT AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY, name VARCHAR(20))";

          connection.query(querySQL,function(err,rows,field){

            if(err) throw err;

            console.log("The table has been created");
            console.log(rows);

          });

        }

      })
      .catch(console.log)
      .then( ()=> {

        querySQL = "SELECT x FROM y";

        connection.promise().query(querySQL).then(([rows,fields])=> {

          /*
          More stuff
          */

        })
        .catch(console.log)
        .then( ()=> console.log("Promise ended") );

      });

    });

The question is if I'm doing good chaining promises like that or there is another way, because this code is to create the tables of the database if there isn't any and then insert data. After the first insert every time the website updates his content, I'll create a temporary table to check if there is a new category, object... etc so this leads me to more promise inside this promises.

1
  • The then function after the catch statement, is it meant to continue after the catch? Oct 3, 2019 at 13:04

2 Answers 2

9

I'd suggest trying the async/await syntax, it keeps things a little more readable.

This should do what you wish:

async function tableExists(pool, tableName) {
    try {
        const query = `SELECT 1 FROM ${tableName} LIMIT 1;`;
        await pool.execute(query);
        return true;
    } catch (err) {
        return false;
    }
}

async function createdb() {
    const mysql = require('mysql2/promise');

    const config = {
        host: 'host',
        user: 'username',
        password: 'password_goes_here',
        database: 'some_database'
    }

    const pool = mysql.createPool(config);

    let tableOk = await tableExists(pool, "categories");
    if (tableOk) {
        console.log("Table 'Categories' already exists.");
        return;
    }
    console.log("Table 'Categories' does not exist, creating...");

    try { 
        const createQuery = "CREATE TABLE Categories (id INT AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY, name VARCHAR(20));";
        await pool.execute(createQuery);
        console.log("Table created successfully.");
    } catch (err) {
        console.error("Table creation failed:", err);
    }

    pool.end();
}

createdb();
3
  • 1
    Okay, I like this approach as it is more legible, so if I want to make more queries in that connection I can make a function with them and use them inside createdb, right?
    – Sky
    Oct 3, 2019 at 15:54
  • Oh sure, yes. I think the async / await syntax reads much more like synchronous code and it's easier to follow than chaining up promise handlers.To add more queries just add more pool.execute(.. ,..) calls. You can pass in parameters and get back rows as well of course! Oct 3, 2019 at 16:01
  • Glad to be of help! Happy coding!! Oct 3, 2019 at 16:12
4

Your promises can you chained a bit better, we have a problem with promises article helped me understand promises better.

You should avoid nesting promises and your case you can return the values of your promises to chain them.Great example about Promise chaining

I would flatten out your promise structure like this.

pool.getConnection(function(err, connection){
    if(err) throw err;
    var querySQL = "SELECT 1 FROM Categories LIMIT 1";
    return connection.promise().query(querySQL)
    .then((results)=> {
      if (results.rows!=undefined) {
        console.error("The table already exist");
        throw "The table already exist";
      }
      else {
        let querySQL = "CREATE TABLE Categories (id INT AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY, name VARCHAR(20))";
        return connection.query(querySQL);
      }
    })
    .then((err, rows,) => {
        if(err) throw err;
        console.log("The table has been created");
        console.log(rows);
        return rows;
    })
    .catch(console.log)
    .finally(()=> {
      var querySQL = "SELECT x FROM y";
      return connection.promise().query(querySQL)
    })
    .then((results, error) => {
        /*
        More stuff
        */
        return nextPromise;
    //   .then( ()=> console.log("Promise ended") );

    })
    .then(() =>{
        console.log("Promise ended")
    })
  });
1
  • The other answer looks cleaner to me, but thank you for the article and the code, it will be very useful in the future when I have doubts with the promises
    – Sky
    Oct 3, 2019 at 16:12

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