998

How can I disable landscape mode for some of the views in my Android app?

1

31 Answers 31

1743

Add android:screenOrientation="portrait" to the activity in the AndroidManifest.xml. For example:

<activity android:name=".SomeActivity"
          android:label="@string/app_name"
          android:screenOrientation="portrait" />

Since this has become a super-popular answer, I feel very guilty as forcing portrait is rarely the right solution to the problems it's frequently applied to.
The major caveats with forced portrait:

  • This does not absolve you of having to think about activity lifecycle events or properly saving/restoring state. There are plenty of things besides app rotation that can trigger an activity destruction/recreation, including unavoidable things like multitasking. There are no shortcuts; learn to use bundles and retainInstance fragments.
  • Keep in mind that unlike the fairly uniform iPhone experience, there are some devices where portrait is not the clearly popular orientation. When users are on devices with hardware keyboards or game pads a la the Nvidia Shield, on Chromebooks, on foldables, or on Samsung DeX, forcing portrait can make your app experience either limiting or a giant usability hassle. If your app doesn't have a strong UX argument that would lead to a negative experience for supporting other orientations, you should probably not force landscape. I'm talking about things like "this is a cash register app for one specific model of tablet always used in a fixed hardware dock."

So most apps should just let the phone sensors, software, and physical configuration make their own decision about how the user wants to interact with your app. A few cases you may still want to think about, though, if you're not happy with the default behavior of sensor orientation in your use case:

  • If your main concern is accidental orientation changes mid-activity that you think the device's sensors and software won't cope with well (for example, in a tilt-based game) consider supporting landscape and portrait, but using nosensor for the orientation. This forces landscape on most tablets and portrait on most phones, but I still wouldn't recommend this for most "normal" apps (some users just like to type in the landscape softkeyboard on their phones, and many tablet users read in portrait - and you should let them).
  • If you still need to force portrait for some reason, sensorPortrait may be better than portrait for Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) and later; this allows for upside-down portrait, which is quite common in tablet usage.
13
  • 59
    It is possible to do it for the entire app. Check this out stackoverflow.com/a/9784269/1300707 May 31 '12 at 18:54
  • 1
    I noticed that there's another portrait: sensorPortait. What's the difference between sensorPortait and portrait?
    – LiangWang
    Aug 1 '13 at 0:05
  • 1
    If you read Google's docs: "Portrait orientation, but can be either normal or reverse portrait based on the device sensor. Added in API level 9." So - that is - "portrait, right side up or upside down, Android 2.3+ only." Aug 1 '13 at 21:06
  • 2
    As I noted in my answer below - to get around several issues, "nosensor" is likely a better option.
    – Mike Weir
    Aug 21 '13 at 19:24
  • 1
    I have to say I disagree. Not all experiences are compatible with landscape mode on phones, so you should let the UX decide, not the sensors. This isn't the case on tablets though. May 14 '19 at 14:30
115

I was not aware of the AndroidManifest.xml file switch until reading this post, so in my apps I have used this instead:

setRequestedOrientation(ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_PORTRAIT); // Fixed portrait orientation
3
  • 10
    this can make your activity jump on first load if the device is not in the specified orientation.
    – Dori
    Nov 25 '11 at 14:27
  • I was using this method, I was calling it in OnCreate then I would read data from some asset files. If I would start the app with device in landscape orientation it would rotate but this would result in erroneously reading those initialization assets, for some weird reason (maybe should have wait for the rotation to finish some how). Using the xml alternative didn't cause this issue. Nov 12 '14 at 10:48
  • 1
    That may be an issue with the start up sequence for Android programs. You could try moving the setRequestedOrientation() to onResume()???
    – Rich
    Nov 12 '14 at 15:37
48

Add android:screenOrientation="portrait" in your manifest file where you declare your activity. Like this:

<activity 
    android:name=".yourActivity"
    ....
    android:screenOrientation="portrait" />

If you want to do it using Java code, try:

setRequestedOrientation (ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_PORTRAIT);

before you call setContentView method for your activity in onCreate().

31

A lot of the answers here are suggesting to use "portrait" in your AndroidManifest.xml file. This might seem like a good solution - but as noted in the documentation, you are singling out devices that may only have landscape. You are also forcing certain devices (that work best in landscape) to go into portrait, not getting the proper orientation.

My suggestion is to use "nosensor" instead. This will leave the device to use its default preferred orientation, will not block any purchases/downloads on Google Play, and will ensure the sensor doesn't mess up your (NDK, in my case) game.

2
  • Since many are up-voting this, I'd like to point out that I've since gone with other answers suggesting "portrait" as certain obscure devices do in fact respond unpredictably when wanting to implement in-app screen rotation, which became a requirement later on for me. I also doubt any apps with "portrait" would get blocked by any Google Play setup.
    – Mike Weir
    Apr 4 '17 at 21:17
  • Google Play does in fact filter out portrait-only apps on landscape-only devices, see the note on this page: developer.android.com/guide/topics/manifest/… ("the value you declare enables filtering by services such as Google Play")
    – miracle2k
    Sep 29 '17 at 13:39
16

Just add this line in your Manifest:

android:screenOrientation="portrait"

Like:

<manifest
    package="com.example.speedtest"
    android:versionCode="1"
    android:versionName="1.0" >

    <application
        android:allowBackup="true"
        android:icon="@drawable/ic_launcher"
        android:label="@string/app_name"
        android:theme="@style/AppTheme" >

        <activity
            android:name="ComparisionActivity"
            android:label="@string/app_name"
            android:screenOrientation="portrait" >
        </activity>

    </application>

</manifest>
15

If you want user-settings, then I'd recommend setRequestedOrientation (ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_PORTRAIT);

You can change the settings from a settings menu.

I require this because my timers must correspond to what's on the screen, and rotating the screen will destroy the current activity.

13

If you want to disable Landscape mode for your Android app (or a single activity) all you need to do is add:

android:screenOrientation="portrait" to the activity tag in AndroidManifest.xml file.

Like:

<activity 
    android:name="YourActivityName"
    android:icon="@drawable/ic_launcher"
    android:label="Your App Name"
    android:screenOrientation="portrait">

Another way: A programmatic approach.

If you want to do this programmatically, i.e., using Java code. You can do so by adding the below code in the Java class of the activity that you don't want to be displayed in landscape mode.

setRequestedOrientation(ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_PORTRAIT);
2
  • 2
    Since so many answers give advice that contradict the good advice of @Phoenix and @Yoni, I think a good bottom line is to reiterate what they suggest: android:screenOrientation="nosensor">
    – DSlomer64
    Apr 18 '15 at 17:21
  • 1
    @DSlomer64 Yes .If you want to cope with tablet devices then you should use the nosensor value instead portrait Apr 19 '15 at 5:09
12

You can do this for your entire application without having to make all your activities extend a common base class.

The trick is first to make sure you include an Application subclass in your project. In its onCreate(), called when your app first starts up, you register an ActivityLifecycleCallbacks object (API level 14+) to receive notifications of activity lifecycle events.

This gives you the opportunity to execute your own code whenever any activity in your app is started (or stopped, or resumed, or whatever). At this point you can call setRequestedOrientation() on the newly created activity.

And do not forget to add app:name=".MyApp" in your manifest file.

class MyApp extends Application {

    @Override
    public void onCreate() {
        super.onCreate();  

        // register to be informed of activities starting up
        registerActivityLifecycleCallbacks(new ActivityLifecycleCallbacks() {

            @Override
            public void onActivityCreated(Activity activity, 
                                          Bundle savedInstanceState) {

                // new activity created; force its orientation to portrait
                activity.setRequestedOrientation(
                    ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_PORTRAIT);
            }
            ....
        });
    }
}
8

Use this in onCreate() of the Activity

setRequestedOrientation(ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_PORTRAIT);
8

You should change android:screenOrientation="sensorPortrait" in AndroidManifest.xml

1
7

Just add this attribute in your activity tag.

 android:screenOrientation="portrait"
1
  • Why is it so simple, given the previous answers? E.g., does it depend on the Android version? Jun 2 at 14:31
7

If you don't want to go through the hassle of adding orientation in each manifest entry of activity better, create a BaseActivity class (inherits 'Activity' or 'AppCompatActivity') which will be inherited by every activity of your application instead of 'Activity' or 'AppCompatActivity' and just add the following piece of code in your BaseActivity:

@Override
protected void onCreate(@Nullable Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setRequestedOrientation (ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_PORTRAIT);
    // rest of your code......
}
1
7

Add android:screenOrientation="portrait" to the activity you want to disable landscape mode in.

6

How to change orientation in some of the view

Instead of locking orientation of the entire activity, you can use this class to dynamically lock orientation from any of your view pragmatically:

Make your view Landscape

OrientationUtils.lockOrientationLandscape(mActivity);

Make your view Portrait

OrientationUtils.lockOrientationPortrait(mActivity);

Unlock Orientation

OrientationUtils.unlockOrientation(mActivity);

Orientation Util Class

import android.app.Activity;
import android.content.Context;
import android.content.pm.ActivityInfo;
import android.content.res.Configuration;
import android.os.Build;
import android.view.Surface;
import android.view.WindowManager;

/*  * This class is used to lock orientation of android app in nay android devices
 */

public class OrientationUtils {
    private OrientationUtils() {
    }

    /** Locks the device window in landscape mode. */
    public static void lockOrientationLandscape(Activity activity) {
        activity.setRequestedOrientation(ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_SENSOR_LANDSCAPE);
    }

    /** Locks the device window in portrait mode. */
    public static void lockOrientationPortrait(Activity activity) {
        activity.setRequestedOrientation(ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_PORTRAIT);
    }

    /** Locks the device window in actual screen mode. */
    public static void lockOrientation(Activity activity) {
        final int orientation = activity.getResources().getConfiguration().orientation;
        final int rotation = ((WindowManager) activity.getSystemService(Context.WINDOW_SERVICE)).getDefaultDisplay()
                .getRotation();

        // Copied from Android docs, since we don't have these values in Froyo
        // 2.2
        int SCREEN_ORIENTATION_REVERSE_LANDSCAPE = 8;
        int SCREEN_ORIENTATION_REVERSE_PORTRAIT = 9;

        // Build.VERSION.SDK_INT <= Build.VERSION_CODES.FROYO
        if (!(Build.VERSION.SDK_INT <= Build.VERSION_CODES.FROYO)) {
            SCREEN_ORIENTATION_REVERSE_LANDSCAPE = ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_LANDSCAPE;
            SCREEN_ORIENTATION_REVERSE_PORTRAIT = ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_PORTRAIT;
        }

        if (rotation == Surface.ROTATION_0 || rotation == Surface.ROTATION_90) {
            if (orientation == Configuration.ORIENTATION_PORTRAIT) {
                activity.setRequestedOrientation(ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_PORTRAIT);
            } else if (orientation == Configuration.ORIENTATION_LANDSCAPE) {
                activity.setRequestedOrientation(ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_LANDSCAPE);
            }
        } else if (rotation == Surface.ROTATION_180 || rotation == Surface.ROTATION_270) {
            if (orientation == Configuration.ORIENTATION_PORTRAIT) {
                activity.setRequestedOrientation(SCREEN_ORIENTATION_REVERSE_PORTRAIT);
            } else if (orientation == Configuration.ORIENTATION_LANDSCAPE) {
                activity.setRequestedOrientation(SCREEN_ORIENTATION_REVERSE_LANDSCAPE);
            }
        }
    }

    /** Unlocks the device window in user defined screen mode. */
    public static void unlockOrientation(Activity activity) {
        activity.setRequestedOrientation(ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_USER);
    }

}
1
5

Use:

android:configChanges="keyboardHidden|orientation"
android:screenOrientation="portrait" 
1
  • An explanation would be in order. E.g., what is the idea/gist? How is it better/different from the previous answers? Jun 2 at 14:25
5

You must set the orientation of each activity.

<activity
    android:name="com.example.SplashScreen2"
    android:label="@string/app_name"
    android:screenOrientation="portrait"
    android:theme="@android:style/Theme.Black.NoTitleBar" >
</activity>
<activity
    android:name="com.example.Registration"
    android:label="@string/app_name"
    android:screenOrientation="portrait"
    android:theme="@android:style/Theme.Black.NoTitleBar" >
</activity>
<activity
    android:name="com.example.Verification"
    android:label="@string/app_name"
    android:screenOrientation="portrait"
    android:theme="@android:style/Theme.Black.NoTitleBar" >
</activity>
<activity
    android:name="com.example.WelcomeAlmostDone"
    android:label="@string/app_name"
    android:screenOrientation="portrait"
    android:theme="@android:style/Theme.Black.NoTitleBar" >
</activity>
<activity
    android:name="com.example.PasswordRegistration"
    android:label="@string/app_name"
    android:screenOrientation="portrait"
    android:theme="@android:style/Theme.Black.NoTitleBar" >
</activity>
5

If you are using Xamarin C#, some of these solutions will not work. Here is the solution I found to work.

[Activity(MainLauncher = true, Icon = "@drawable/icon", ScreenOrientation = ScreenOrientation.Portrait)]

Above the class works well, similar to the other solutions. Also, it is not globally applicable and needs to be placed in each activity header.

1
  • What do you mean by "Above the class works well"? Jun 2 at 14:52
4

Add a class inside the oncreate() method:

setRequestedOrientation(ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_PORTRAIT);
1
4

You can force your particular activity to always remain in portrait mode by writing this in your manifest.xml file:

<activity
    android:name=".MainActivity"
    android:screenOrientation="portrait"></activity>

You can also force your activity to remain in portrait mode by writing following line in your activity's onCreate() method:

@Override
protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.your_layout);
    setRequestedOrientation(ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_PORTRAIT);
}
3
<android . . . >
    . . .
    <manifest . . . >
        . . .
        <application>
            <activity
                android:name=".MyActivity"
                android:screenOrientation="portrait"
                android:configChanges="keyboardHidden|orientation">
            </activity>
        </application>
    </manifest>
</android>
3
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<manifest xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    package="in.co.nurture.bajajfinserv">
    <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.INTERNET"></uses-permission>

    <application

        android:allowBackup="true"
        android:icon="@mipmap/ic_launcher"
        android:label="@string/app_name"
        android:roundIcon="@mipmap/ic_launcher_round"
        android:supportsRtl="true"
        android:theme="@style/AppTheme">
        <activity android:name=".MainActivity" android:screenOrientation="portrait">

            <intent-filter>
                <action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN" />

                <category android:name="android.intent.category.LAUNCHER" />
            </intent-filter>
        </activity>
    </application>
</manifest>

We can restrict the Activity in portrait or landscape mode by using the attribute or android:screenOrientation.

If we have more than one activity in our program then we have the freedom to restrict any one of activity in any one the mode and it never affects the others which you don't want.

3

Either in the manifest class:

<activity android:name=".yourActivity"
    ....
    android:screenOrientation="portrait" />

Or programmatically:

setRequestedOrientation(ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_PORTRAIT);

Note: you should call this before setContentView method for your activity in onCreate().

1
  • @PeterMortensen press ctrl+N, then type manifest Jun 7 at 16:46
3

Add the below command to your project,

npm install

npm i react-native-orientation-locker

Then you use a manifest class like, React_Native (Your Project Folder)/ android/app/src/main/AndroidManifest.xml:

<manifest xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
  package="com.payroll_react">

  <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.INTERNET" />
  <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.SYSTEM_ALERT_WINDOW"/>

  <application
    android:name=".MainApplication"
    android:label="@string/app_name"
    android:icon="@mipmap/ic_launcher"
    android:allowBackup="false"
    android:theme="@style/AppTheme">
    <activity
      android:name=".MainActivity"
      android:label="@string/app_name"
      android:screenOrientation="landscape"
      android:configChanges="keyboard|keyboardHidden|orientation|screenSize"
      android:windowSoftInputMode="adjustResize">
      <intent-filter>
          <action android:name="android.intent.action.MAIN" />
          <category android:name="android.intent.category.LAUNCHER" />
      </intent-filter>
    </activity>
    <activity android:name="com.facebook.react.devsupport.DevSettingsActivity" />
  </application>

</manifest>
2

In the <apphome>/platform/android directory, create AndroidManifest.xml (copying it from the generated one).

Then add android:screenOrientation="portrait" to all of the activity elements.

2

Add android:screenOrientation="portrait" in the AndroidManifest.xml file.

For example:

<activity 
    android:name=".MapScreen"
    android:screenOrientation="portrait"></activity>
2

It worked for me. Try to add this code in the AndroidManifest file:

<application
    android:allowBackup="true"
    android:icon="@mipmap/ic_launcher"
    android:label="@string/app_name"
    android:roundIcon="@mipmap/ic_launcher_round"
    android:supportsRtl="true"
    android:screenOrientation="portrait"
    android:theme="@style/AppTheme">
    ....
    ....
</application>
2
  • I would have been a great solution, as you don't have to set per activity. Unfortunately, doesn't work in my app.
    – Myroslav
    May 21 '20 at 14:09
  • Is "AndroidManifest" the (literal) name of the file? Jun 2 at 16:11
2

Put it into your manifest.

<activity
    android:name=".MainActivity"
    android:label="@string/app_name"
    android:screenOrientation="sensorPortrait" />

The orientation will be portrait, but if the user's phone is upside down, it shows the correct way as well. (So your screen will rotate 180 degrees.)


The system ignores this attribute if the activity is running in multi-window mode.

More: https://developer.android.com/guide/topics/manifest/activity-element

2
  • Re "this attribute": What attribute? What does it refer to? Jun 2 at 16:21
  • "this attribute" refers to the "screenOreintation" attribute
    – Marci
    Jun 7 at 11:58
1

The following attribute on the activity in AndroidManifest.xml is all you need:

android:configChanges="orientation"

So, full activity node:

<activity
    android:name="Activity1"
    android:icon="@drawable/icon"
    android:label="App Name"
    android:configChanges="orientation">
1
  • There are so much answers left, you should provide more information, why one should use yours. Especially docs say's not using this Option: "Note: Using this attribute should be avoided and used only as a last resort. Please read Handling Runtime Changes for more information about how to properly handle a restart due to a configuration change." developer.android.com/guide/topics/manifest/…
    – Murmel
    Jun 10 '14 at 13:46
1

In Kotlin, the same can be programmatically achieved using the below:

requestedOrientation = ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_PORTRAIT
0

If your activity is related to the first device orientation state, get the current device orientation in the onCreate method and then fix it forever:

int deviceRotation = ((WindowManager) getBaseContext().getSystemService(Context.WINDOW_SERVICE)).getDefaultDisplay().getOrientation();

if(deviceRotation == Surface.ROTATION_0) {
    setRequestedOrientation(ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_PORTRAIT);
}
else if(deviceRotation == Surface.ROTATION_180)
{
    setRequestedOrientation(ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_REVERSE_PORTRAIT);
}
else if(deviceRotation == Surface.ROTATION_90)
{
    setRequestedOrientation(ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_LANDSCAPE);
}
else if(deviceRotation == Surface.ROTATION_270)
{
    setRequestedOrientation(ActivityInfo.SCREEN_ORIENTATION_REVERSE_LANDSCAPE);
}

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