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I have a PowerQuery table called "On Holds" in Excel as below:

| Action User | Index |
|-------------|-------|
| Employee A  | 1     |
| Employee B  | 1     |
| Employee B  | 1     |
| Employee B  | 1     |
| Employee C  | 1     |
| Employee C  | 1     |
| Employee C  | 1     |
| Employee C  | 1     |
| Employee C  | 1     |
| Employee D  | 1     |
| Employee D  | 1     |
| Employee D  | 1     |

I'm looking to convert it to look like this (it'll have column headers, but I'm not bothered what they are):

| Employee A | 1 |   |   |   |   |
| Employee B | 1 | 1 | 1 |   |   |
| Employee C | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 | 1 |
| Employee D | 1 | 1 | 1 |   |   |  

I have a separate table (TeamMembers) that lists unique employee names that I've tried joining to create this list but ultimately end up with versions similar to the original table.

I could do it with VBA or a series of Transpose formula outside of Powerquery but feel this isn't the best way to go - formula would need updating each week to take into account the different number of rows.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.


A basic transpose doesn't work as it ends up like this:

| Column1    | Column2    | Column3    | Column4    | Column5    | Column6    |
|------------|------------|------------|------------|------------|------------|
| Employee A | Employee B | Employee B | Employee B | Employee C | Employee C |
| 1          | 1          | 1          | 1          | 1          | 1          |

A pivot ends up like this:

| Employee A | Employee B | Employee C | Employee D |
|------------|------------|------------|------------|
| 1          | 3          | 5          | 3          |  
2

The overall trick is to get a new column with cumulative count on Action User into the table:

Select Action User column. Group By ... [x] Basic, Group by:Action User, New column Name:Count, Operation:Count Rows [ok]

and modify resulting code from

= Table.Group(Source, {"Action User"}, {{"Count", each Table.RowCount(_), type number}})

to

= Table.Group(Source, {"Action User"}, {{"Count", each Table.AddIndexColumn(_, "Cum",1,1), type table}})

Expand Index and Cum by clicking on arrows next to Count column header

Select Cum column, Pivot column.., using Index as Values Column [x] advanced options, don't aggregate

Full code below

let Source = Excel.CurrentWorkbook(){[Name="Table1"]}[Content],
#"Grouped Rows" = Table.Group(Source, {"Action User"}, {{"Count", each Table.AddIndexColumn(_, "Cum",1,1), type table}}),
#"Expanded Count" = Table.ExpandTableColumn(#"Grouped Rows", "Count", {"Index", "Cum"}, {"Index", "Cum"}),
#"Pivoted Column1" = Table.Pivot(Table.TransformColumnTypes(#"Expanded Count", {{"Cum", type text}}, "en-US"), List.Distinct(Table.TransformColumnTypes(#"Expanded Count", {{"Cum", type text}}, "en-US")[Cum]), "Cum", "Index")
in #"Pivoted Column1"
| improve this answer | |
  • Quick question - if the Index column are various numbers in ascending order so, for example, Employee B has numbers 7, 443 & 913 why does the number not stay in numerical order? It comes out as 443, 7, 913 which seems to be a text sort and the column type shows ABC123 rather than just 123. Is there something I could add to keep those in numerical order? – Darren Bartrup-Cook Oct 4 '19 at 12:38
  • Mine shows up as original sort, so don't know why. Try Alexis' below maybe – horseyride Oct 4 '19 at 18:43
  • Apologies - it shows in the correct order if I remember to sort it first. The column I didn't show in my example is "Cumm. Days on Hold" and #"Sorted Rows" = Table.Sort(#"Filtered Rows",{{"Action User", Order.Ascending}, {"Cumm. Days on Hold", Order.Ascending}}), brought everything out correctly. Thanks again for your help. – Darren Bartrup-Cook Oct 7 '19 at 13:42
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Another way to do this is to do a Group By and change your aggregating function. To concatenate instead of sum/max/average. Then you can split by the delimiter you use in your concatenating Text.Combine function.

When you do a Group By, the step usually looks like this:

= Table.Group(Source, {"ActionUser"}, {{"Sum", each List.Sum([Index]), type number}})

What I've done is replace List.Sum([Index]) by the following:

Text.Combine(List.Transform([Index], Text.From), ",")

This converts the numbers to text and then concatenates them with Text.Combine using a comma as the delimiter to give a table like this:

Group By Concatenated

From here, Transform > Split Column > By Delimiter will complete the job.


Full M code:

let
    Source = Table1,
    #"Grouped Rows" = Table.Group(Source, {"ActionUser"}, {{"Concat", each Text.Combine(List.Transform([Index], Text.From), ","), type text}}),
    #"Split Column by Delimiter" = Table.SplitColumn(#"Grouped Rows", "Concat", Splitter.SplitTextByDelimiter(",", QuoteStyle.Csv), {"Concat.1", "Concat.2", "Concat.3", "Concat.4", "Concat.5"}),
    #"Changed Type" = Table.TransformColumnTypes(#"Split Column by Delimiter",{{"Concat.1", Int64.Type}, {"Concat.2", Int64.Type}, {"Concat.3", Int64.Type}, {"Concat.4", Int64.Type}, {"Concat.5", Int64.Type}})
in
    #"Changed Type"
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for the response @Alexis. Problem I'm having with this answer is that it only shows five columns worth of data (as that's what my example had). My actual data has a variable number of columns - at the moment the minimum is 1 column and the maximum is 28 columns. – Darren Bartrup-Cook Oct 7 '19 at 13:39
  • Yeah. It's possible to make this more dynamic for variable columns but horseyride's solution is probably better in that case. – Alexis Olson Oct 7 '19 at 13:44
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As variant

let
   Source = Excel.CurrentWorkbook(){[Name="Table2"]}[Content],
   #"Changed Type" = Table.TransformColumnTypes(Source,{{"Action User", type text}, {"Index", type text}}),
   #"Grouped Rows" = Table.Group(#"Changed Type", {"Action User"}, {{"Count", each _[Index]}}),
   Custom1 = Table.FromColumns(#"Grouped Rows"[Count],#"Grouped Rows"[Action User]),
   #"Demoted Headers" = Table.DemoteHeaders(Custom1),
   #"Transposed Table" = Table.Transpose(#"Demoted Headers")
in
   #"Transposed Table"
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    While this code may solve the question, including an explanation of how and why this solves the problem would really help to improve the quality of your post, and probably result in more up-votes. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, not just the person asking now. Please edit your answer to add explanations and give an indication of what limitations and assumptions apply. – Богдан Опир Jun 28 at 20:11

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