134

I have a logo that is residing at the public/images/logo.gif . Here is my nodejs code.

http.createServer(function(req, res){
  res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain' });
  res.end('Hello World \n');
}).listen(8080, '127.0.0.1');

It works but when I request for localhost:8080/logo.gif then I obviously I don't get the logo.

What changes I need to do to serve an image.

10 Answers 10

179

2016 Update

Examples with Express and without Express that actually work

This question is over 5 years old but every answer has some problems.

TL;DR

Scroll down for examples to serve an image with:

  1. express.static
  2. express
  3. connect
  4. http
  5. net

All of the examples are also on GitHub: https://github.com/rsp/node-static-http-servers

Test results are available on Travis: https://travis-ci.org/rsp/node-static-http-servers

Introduction

After over 5 years since this question was asked there is only one correct answer by generalhenry but even though that answer has no problems with the code, it seems to have some problems with reception. It was commented that it "doesn't explain much other than how to rely on someone else to get the job done" and the fact how many people have voted this comment up clearly shows that a lot of things need clarification.

First of all, a good answer to "How to serve images using Node.js" is not implementing a static file server from scratch and doing it badly. A good answer is using a module like Express that does the job correctly.

Answering comments that say that using Express "doesn't explain much other than how to rely on someone else to get the job done" it should be noted, that using the http module already relies on someone else to get the job done. If someone doesn't want to rely on anyone to get the job done then at least raw TCP sockets should be used instead - which I do in one of my examples below.

A more serious problem is that all of the answers here that use the http module are broken. They introduce race conditions, insecure path resolution that will lead to path traversal vulnerability, blocking I/O that will completely fail to serve any concurrent requests at all and other subtle problems - they are completely broken as examples of what the question asks about, and yet they already use the abstraction that is provided by the http module instead of using TCP sockets so they don't even do everything from scratch as they claim.

If the question was "How to implement static file server from scratch, as a learning exercise" then by all means answers how to do that should be posted - but even then we should expect them to at least be correct. Also, it is not unreasonable to assume that someone who wants to serve an image might want to serve more images in the future so one could argue that writing a specific custom static file server that can serve only one single file with hard-coded path is somewhat shortsighted. It seems hard to imagine that anyone who searches for an answer on how to serve an image would be content with a solution that serves just a single image instead of a general solution to serve any image.

In short, the question is how to serve an image and an answer to that is to use an appropriate module to do that in a secure, preformant and reliable way that is readable, maintainable and future-proof while using the best practice of professional Node development. But I agree that a great addition to such an answer would be showing a way to implement the same functionality manually but sadly every attempt to do that has failed so far. And that is why I wrote some new examples.

After this short introduction, here are my five examples doing the job on 5 different levels of abstraction.

Minimum functionality

Every example serves files from the public directory and supports the minumum functionality of:

  • MIME types for most common files
  • serves HTML, JS, CSS, plain text and images
  • serves index.html as a default directory index
  • responds with error codes for missing files
  • no path traversal vulnerabilities
  • no race conditions while reading files

I tested every version on Node versions 4, 5, 6 and 7.

express.static

This version uses the express.static built-in middleware of the express module.

This example has the most functionality and the least amount of code.

var path = require('path');
var express = require('express');
var app = express();

var dir = path.join(__dirname, 'public');

app.use(express.static(dir));

app.listen(3000, function () {
    console.log('Listening on http://localhost:3000/');
});

express

This version uses the express module but without the express.static middleware. Serving static files is implemented as a single route handler using streams.

This example has simple path traversal countermeasures and supports a limited set of most common MIME types.

var path = require('path');
var express = require('express');
var app = express();
var fs = require('fs');

var dir = path.join(__dirname, 'public');

var mime = {
    html: 'text/html',
    txt: 'text/plain',
    css: 'text/css',
    gif: 'image/gif',
    jpg: 'image/jpeg',
    png: 'image/png',
    svg: 'image/svg+xml',
    js: 'application/javascript'
};

app.get('*', function (req, res) {
    var file = path.join(dir, req.path.replace(/\/$/, '/index.html'));
    if (file.indexOf(dir + path.sep) !== 0) {
        return res.status(403).end('Forbidden');
    }
    var type = mime[path.extname(file).slice(1)] || 'text/plain';
    var s = fs.createReadStream(file);
    s.on('open', function () {
        res.set('Content-Type', type);
        s.pipe(res);
    });
    s.on('error', function () {
        res.set('Content-Type', 'text/plain');
        res.status(404).end('Not found');
    });
});

app.listen(3000, function () {
    console.log('Listening on http://localhost:3000/');
});

connect

This version uses the connect module which is a one level of abstraction lower than express.

This example has similar functionality to the express version but using slightly lower-lever APIs.

var path = require('path');
var connect = require('connect');
var app = connect();
var fs = require('fs');

var dir = path.join(__dirname, 'public');

var mime = {
    html: 'text/html',
    txt: 'text/plain',
    css: 'text/css',
    gif: 'image/gif',
    jpg: 'image/jpeg',
    png: 'image/png',
    svg: 'image/svg+xml',
    js: 'application/javascript'
};

app.use(function (req, res) {
    var reqpath = req.url.toString().split('?')[0];
    if (req.method !== 'GET') {
        res.statusCode = 501;
        res.setHeader('Content-Type', 'text/plain');
        return res.end('Method not implemented');
    }
    var file = path.join(dir, reqpath.replace(/\/$/, '/index.html'));
    if (file.indexOf(dir + path.sep) !== 0) {
        res.statusCode = 403;
        res.setHeader('Content-Type', 'text/plain');
        return res.end('Forbidden');
    }
    var type = mime[path.extname(file).slice(1)] || 'text/plain';
    var s = fs.createReadStream(file);
    s.on('open', function () {
        res.setHeader('Content-Type', type);
        s.pipe(res);
    });
    s.on('error', function () {
        res.setHeader('Content-Type', 'text/plain');
        res.statusCode = 404;
        res.end('Not found');
    });
});

app.listen(3000, function () {
    console.log('Listening on http://localhost:3000/');
});

http

This version uses the http module which is the lowest-level API for HTTP in Node.

This example has similar functionality to the connect version but using even more lower-level APIs.

var path = require('path');
var http = require('http');
var fs = require('fs');

var dir = path.join(__dirname, 'public');

var mime = {
    html: 'text/html',
    txt: 'text/plain',
    css: 'text/css',
    gif: 'image/gif',
    jpg: 'image/jpeg',
    png: 'image/png',
    svg: 'image/svg+xml',
    js: 'application/javascript'
};

var server = http.createServer(function (req, res) {
    var reqpath = req.url.toString().split('?')[0];
    if (req.method !== 'GET') {
        res.statusCode = 501;
        res.setHeader('Content-Type', 'text/plain');
        return res.end('Method not implemented');
    }
    var file = path.join(dir, reqpath.replace(/\/$/, '/index.html'));
    if (file.indexOf(dir + path.sep) !== 0) {
        res.statusCode = 403;
        res.setHeader('Content-Type', 'text/plain');
        return res.end('Forbidden');
    }
    var type = mime[path.extname(file).slice(1)] || 'text/plain';
    var s = fs.createReadStream(file);
    s.on('open', function () {
        res.setHeader('Content-Type', type);
        s.pipe(res);
    });
    s.on('error', function () {
        res.setHeader('Content-Type', 'text/plain');
        res.statusCode = 404;
        res.end('Not found');
    });
});

server.listen(3000, function () {
    console.log('Listening on http://localhost:3000/');
});

net

This version uses the net module which is the lowest-level API for TCP sockets in Node.

This example has some of the functionality of the http version but the minimal and incomplete HTTP protocol has been implemented from scratch. Since it doesn't support chunked encoding it loads the files into memory before serving them to know the size before sending a response because statting the files and then loading would introduce a race condition.

var path = require('path');
var net = require('net');
var fs = require('fs');

var dir = path.join(__dirname, 'public');

var mime = {
    html: 'text/html',
    txt: 'text/plain',
    css: 'text/css',
    gif: 'image/gif',
    jpg: 'image/jpeg',
    png: 'image/png',
    svg: 'image/svg+xml',
    js: 'application/javascript'
};

var server = net.createServer(function (con) {
    var input = '';
    con.on('data', function (data) {
        input += data;
        if (input.match(/\n\r?\n\r?/)) {
            var line = input.split(/\n/)[0].split(' ');
            var method = line[0], url = line[1], pro = line[2];
            var reqpath = url.toString().split('?')[0];
            if (method !== 'GET') {
                var body = 'Method not implemented';
                con.write('HTTP/1.1 501 Not Implemented\n');
                con.write('Content-Type: text/plain\n');
                con.write('Content-Length: '+body.length+'\n\n');
                con.write(body);
                con.destroy();
                return;
            }
            var file = path.join(dir, reqpath.replace(/\/$/, '/index.html'));
            if (file.indexOf(dir + path.sep) !== 0) {
                var body = 'Forbidden';
                con.write('HTTP/1.1 403 Forbidden\n');
                con.write('Content-Type: text/plain\n');
                con.write('Content-Length: '+body.length+'\n\n');
                con.write(body);
                con.destroy();
                return;
            }
            var type = mime[path.extname(file).slice(1)] || 'text/plain';
            var s = fs.readFile(file, function (err, data) {
                if (err) {
                    var body = 'Not Found';
                    con.write('HTTP/1.1 404 Not Found\n');
                    con.write('Content-Type: text/plain\n');
                    con.write('Content-Length: '+body.length+'\n\n');
                    con.write(body);
                    con.destroy();
                } else {
                    con.write('HTTP/1.1 200 OK\n');
                    con.write('Content-Type: '+type+'\n');
                    con.write('Content-Length: '+data.byteLength+'\n\n');
                    con.write(data);
                    con.destroy();
                }
            });
        }
    });
});

server.listen(3000, function () {
    console.log('Listening on http://localhost:3000/');
});

Download examples

I posted all of the examples on GitHub with more explanation.

Examples with express.static, express, connect, http and net:

Other project using only express.static:

Tests

Test results are available on Travis:

Everything is tested on Node versions 4, 5, 6, and 7.

See also

Other related answers:

  • 5
    Best & complete answer to the question. Too bad, I can upvote you only once. – Kulvar Feb 10 '17 at 12:36
  • 2
    There should be a way to way to revamp vintage questions such as this! I just wasted an hour or so trying to get the 110 vote response to work. Finally I scrolled down just to check. Your answer could (should) be a textbook on the topic. – Thailandian Feb 12 '17 at 23:08
  • 1
    Best Answer and In full detail. Should be the marked the accepted answer. Thanks mate !!! – Prabodh M Dec 16 '17 at 4:50
  • I do not know why anyone would use Express. I did too at the start probably because everyone else did. Then I realized that using Node's http module is the right approach. That is what it is provided for. You get a lot of flexibility. You understand HTTP protocol and you can debug easily. Express provides a lot of jargon and a thin layer over the http module which is easy to implement with raw coding with the http module. I strongly recommend any user of Express or any other such module to move away from them and use http module directly. – Sunny Aug 14 '18 at 5:55
  • Great answer. But I have a question. If the image is very big, if it's possible to serve the image with multipart? Any example? Thanks. – Bagusflyer Sep 18 '18 at 6:25
152

I agree with the other posters that eventually, you should use a framework, such as Express.. but first you should also understand how to do something fundamental like this without a library, to really understand what the library abstracts away for you.. The steps are

  1. Parse the incoming HTTP request, to see which path the user is asking for
  2. Add a pathway in conditional statement for the server to respond to
  3. If the image is requested, read the image file from the disk.
  4. Serve the image content-type in a header
  5. Serve the image contents in the body

The code would look something like this (not tested)

fs = require('fs');
http = require('http');
url = require('url');


http.createServer(function(req, res){
  var request = url.parse(req.url, true);
  var action = request.pathname;

  if (action == '/logo.gif') {
     var img = fs.readFileSync('./logo.gif');
     res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'image/gif' });
     res.end(img, 'binary');
  } else { 
     res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain' });
     res.end('Hello World \n');
  }
}).listen(8080, '127.0.0.1');
  • 27
    You shouldn't use readFileSync in the middle of a response. Either a sync load should be used on the first tic or the async method should be used. codr.cc/s/5d0b73d6/js – generalhenry Apr 29 '11 at 3:01
  • 1
    I'm on board with you on the sync version, for the async version though, I thought the danger of using non-blocking operations for files, was that it could send the response before the entire file was read, and end up leaving you with a partial file being served to the user? Do you need to use chunked encoding if you use an async file read? – noli Apr 29 '11 at 3:08
  • 1
    fs.readFileSync doesn't callback until the whole file is loaded so there's no need for chunk handling. Chunk handling is mostly for network file transfer (since things can take longer than expected). – generalhenry Apr 29 '11 at 4:41
  • 9
    The line res.end(img); should be res.end(img, 'binary');. Good work! – Honza Pokorny Jul 1 '11 at 22:46
  • 3
    +1 for "but first you should also understand how to do something fundamental like this without a library, to really understand what the library abstracts away for you.." – Sunny Nov 11 '15 at 8:37
61

You should use the express framework.

npm install express

and then

var express = require('express');
var app = express();
app.use(express.static(__dirname + '/public'));
app.listen(8080);

and then the URL localhost:8080/images/logo.gif should work.

  • 17
    Safe, but doesn't explain much other than how to rely on someone else to get the job done. – LeeGee Sep 24 '14 at 19:45
  • I added a vanilla node (just core modules) version. – generalhenry Sep 24 '14 at 20:03
  • +I This is the only correct answer posted so far. I explain it in my answer in more details. – rsp Nov 30 '16 at 22:56
14

Vanilla node version as requested:

var http = require('http');
var url = require('url');
var path = require('path');
var fs = require('fs');

http.createServer(function(req, res) {
  // parse url
  var request = url.parse(req.url, true);
  var action = request.pathname;
  // disallow non get requests
  if (req.method !== 'GET') {
    res.writeHead(405, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain' });
    res.end('405 Method Not Allowed');
    return;
  }
  // routes
  if (action === '/') {
    res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain' });
    res.end('Hello World \n');
    return;
  }
  // static (note not safe, use a module for anything serious)
  var filePath = path.join(__dirname, action).split('%20').join(' ');
  fs.exists(filePath, function (exists) {
    if (!exists) {
       // 404 missing files
       res.writeHead(404, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain' });
       res.end('404 Not Found');
       return;
    }
    // set the content type
    var ext = path.extname(action);
    var contentType = 'text/plain';
    if (ext === '.gif') {
       contentType = 'image/gif'
    }
    res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': contentType });
    // stream the file
    fs.createReadStream(filePath, 'utf-8').pipe(res);
  });
}).listen(8080, '127.0.0.1');
  • 2
    You don't want to check for fs.exists (race condition), it'd be a better habit to catch an error when piping. – Brendan Sep 27 '14 at 2:00
  • Though checking exists in this case isn't the node way, everything else about this answer is 1 million times better than the accepted answer. – Ninjaxor May 27 '16 at 0:29
  • 1
    I agree with @BrendanAshworth. The race conditions are present in almost all of the answers here. I wrote more about it in my answer. But Kudos for writing it with streams. Almost all other answers use readFileSync which is blocking and should not be used in any event handlers. – rsp Dec 1 '16 at 9:33
  • 1
    var filePath = path.resolve('public', '.' + parts.pathname); response.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': mime.lookup(parts.pathname)}); mime - package mime-type from npm – Rijen Jun 15 at 4:38
13

I like using Restify for REST services. In my case, I had created a REST service to serve up images and then if an image source returned 404/403, I wanted to return an alternative image. Here's what I came up with combining some of the stuff here:

function processRequest(req, res, next, url) {
    var httpOptions = {
        hostname: host,
        path: url,
        port: port,
        method: 'GET'
    };

    var reqGet = http.request(httpOptions, function (response) {
        var statusCode = response.statusCode;

        // Many images come back as 404/403 so check explicitly
        if (statusCode === 404 || statusCode === 403) {
            // Send default image if error
            var file = 'img/user.png';
            fs.stat(file, function (err, stat) {
                var img = fs.readFileSync(file);
                res.contentType = 'image/png';
                res.contentLength = stat.size;
                res.end(img, 'binary');
            });

        } else {
            var idx = 0;
            var len = parseInt(response.header("Content-Length"));
            var body = new Buffer(len);

            response.setEncoding('binary');

            response.on('data', function (chunk) {
                body.write(chunk, idx, "binary");
                idx += chunk.length;
            });

            response.on('end', function () {
                res.contentType = 'image/jpg';
                res.send(body);
            });

        }
    });

    reqGet.on('error', function (e) {
        // Send default image if error
        var file = 'img/user.png';
        fs.stat(file, function (err, stat) {
            var img = fs.readFileSync(file);
            res.contentType = 'image/png';
            res.contentLength = stat.size;
            res.end(img, 'binary');
        });
    });

    reqGet.end();

    return next();
}
  • You should never use readFileSync inside of event handlers. This is a synchronous operation that blocks your entire process while it reads the file. I explained it in my answer in more detail. – rsp Dec 1 '16 at 9:42
13

It is too late but helps someone, I'm using node version v7.9.0 and express version 4.15.0

if your directory structure is something like this:

your-project
   uploads
   package.json
   server.js

server.js code:

var express         = require('express');
var app             = express();
app.use(express.static(__dirname + '/uploads'));// you can access image 
 //using this url: http://localhost:7000/abc.jpg
//make sure `abc.jpg` is present in `uploads` dir.

//Or you can change the directory for hiding real directory name:

`app.use('/images', express.static(__dirname+'/uploads/'));// you can access image using this url: http://localhost:7000/images/abc.jpg


app.listen(7000);
9

var http = require('http');
var fs = require('fs');

http.createServer(function(req, res) {
  res.writeHead(200,{'content-type':'image/jpg'});
  fs.createReadStream('./image/demo.jpg').pipe(res);
}).listen(3000);
console.log('server running at 3000');
  • simple and to the point, way better than the express answers.. this deserves 1000 upvotes. Just a tip: maybe remove the code snippet and replace it with just javascript text – bluejayke Nov 25 at 4:01
3

This may be a bit off-topic, since you are asking about static file serving via Node.js specifically (where fs.createReadStream('./image/demo.jpg').pipe(res) is actually a good idea), but in production you may want to have your Node app handle tasks, that cannot be tackled otherwise, and off-load static serving to e.g Nginx.

This means less coding inside your app, and better efficiency since reverse proxies are by design ideal for this.

1

This method works for me, it's not dynamic but straight to the point:

const fs      = require('fs');
const express = require('express');
const app     = express();

app.get( '/logo.gif', function( req, res ) {

  fs.readFile( 'logo.gif', function( err, data ) {

    if ( err ) {

      console.log( err );
      return;
    }

    res.write( data );
    return res.end();
  });

});

app.listen( 80 );
0

You need to use a library that is aware of URLs and static files. I recommend using Express. It has facilities for setting up routes, and a static file serving module.

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