11

I'm playing around with EF Core 3 and writing some unit tests and don't seem to be able to setup test data for a view.

When I'm trying to save, I get the error:

Unable to track an instance of type because it does not have a primary key. Only entity types with primary keys may be tracked

public class EFContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<ViewItem> ViewItems { get; set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Entity<ViewItem>().HasNoKey().ToView("vTestView");
    }
}

using (EFContext efContext = new EFContext())
{
    efContext.ViewItems.Add(new ViewItem
    {
        Name = "This is test item #1"
    });

    efContext.SaveChanges();
}
2
  • 1
    I too would like to know the solution to this issue. I migrated to EF Core 3.0 and now im seeing this. I know before when it creates your data context from a db scaffold operation it skips tables that have no primary key, now it generates it but then you just get this error. Oct 9, 2019 at 19:17
  • 2
    @CameronBelt Looks like this is an open issue and in the MS backlog github.com/aspnet/EntityFramework.Docs/issues/898 Oct 17, 2019 at 14:44

2 Answers 2

6

Workaround: IsInMemory()

protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Entity<ViewItem>(entity =>
    {
        if (!Database.IsInMemory())
        {
            entity.HasNoKey();
            entity.ToView("vTestView");
        }
        else
        {
            entity.HasKey(e => e.Name);
        }
    });
}

UPDATE: To preserve the behavior of the Properties Under Test between Test Time and Runtime, you could add a key property that (by convention) you only use during testing, and you configure the model to ignore the property when you are not in testing:

public class ViewItem 
{
    public int TestOnlyKey { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}
public class EFContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<ViewItem> ViewItems { get; set; }
    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Entity<ViewItem>(entity =>
        {
            if (!Database.IsInMemory())
            {
                entity.HasNoKey();
                entity.Ignore(e => e.TestOnlyKey);
                entity.ToView("vTestView");
            }
            else
            {
                entity.HasKey(e => e.TestOnlyKey);
            }
        });
    }
}
5
  • You clearly didn't test this. It's impossible to use Database in OnModelCreating because there isn't even a model yet, let alone a Database object. Also, if this would be possible you'd have a significantly different entity in the test environment, rendering the tests virtually useless. Apr 17, 2020 at 12:53
  • Microsoft documentation implies that this workaround is a reccomended path: "Providers may also enable configuration that is specific to a particular data store." learn.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/modeling. When I tested this myself, in OnModelCreating my Database property was populated with the ProviderName of "Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.InMemory". I created my context by passing in DbContextOptions created by DbContextOptionsBuilder<>().UseInMemoryDatabase().
    – Sam
    Apr 17, 2020 at 20:14
  • While this workaround does change the entity behavior at Unit Test time, this still allows you to perform testing on things like Linq queries and object transforms that result from your queries.
    – Sam
    Apr 17, 2020 at 20:14
  • 1
    OK,I rather sheepishly admit this is one of the few things you can do with Database in OnModelCreating. That still leaves the second objection (which was my main reason for downvoting). Db vendor-specific configuration may be helpful for example when db data type names are different, not when it profoundly changes entity behavior. Apr 17, 2020 at 20:34
  • Fair point that it modifies behavior, which could cause issues if you are not careful and cognizant of the impact. Added an alternative to preserve full behavior of Properties Under Test.
    – Sam
    Apr 18, 2020 at 1:50
2

I recommend using this awesome mocking library: https://github.com/rgvlee/EntityFrameworkCore.Testing

then you can easily do:

    var mockedDbContext = Create.MockedDbContextFor<TestDbContext>();

    mockedDbContext.Query<TestQuery>().AddRangeToReadOnlySource(expectedResult);
2
  • I appreciate that it's been a while, but do you know of any solution that works for .NET 5? I've been using this library and it's great, but it has no .NET 5 support and seems to be unmaintained.
    – pzaj
    Feb 17, 2021 at 8:05
  • 1
    @pzaj - it looks like it has been updated now
    – arhnee
    Sep 4, 2022 at 6:45

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