5

Could you propose any workarounds to implement a reference to variable using closures or any other tricks?

createReference = function() {
    // TODO: how to implement?
};

var x = 5;
var refX = createReference(x); // could be any parameters needed to implement the logic
x = 6;
alert(refX()); // should alert 6

What about passing context as first argument and pass variable name (as string) and later somehow evaluate that reference in predefined context. Is this feasible?

Here's a more complete scenario:

createReference = function(context, prop) {
    return function() {
        return context[prop];
    };
};

Provider = function() {
};
Provider.prototype.x = 5;
Provider.prototype.getXRef = function() {
    return createReference(this, 'x');
};
Provider.prototype.incrementX = function() {
    this.x = this.x + 1;
};

var provider = new Provider();
var refX = provider.getXRef();
provider.incrementX();
alert(refX());
  • 1
    In the future, please don't ask your questions as embedded comments in code. It makes it very difficult to see the question and you risk people closing it as not a question. – Oded Apr 28 '11 at 19:28
  • I'm glad I answered your question but, in your updated scenario, why not just use: Provider.prototype.getXRef = function () { var that = this; return function() { return that.x; }; }; so that you can avoid using a string? – brianpeiris Apr 28 '11 at 20:23
  • createReference is universal way to make a trick. Then in different situation i'll just use this universal way. On you comment: it cold be no Provider.prototype.getXRef method, but in some other method possibly i would like to pass reference to some other object as a callback parameter etc... It will be more readable to write createReference(this, 'x') then function () { var that = this; return function() { return that.x; }; }; in day to day usage. – Mykhaylo Adamovych Apr 28 '11 at 20:37
  • I see. Please take a look at the latest edit on my answer for a more generic solution. I really think you should avoid using strings but I'll leave it up to you :) – brianpeiris Apr 28 '11 at 21:03
5

You have to use a string of the variable name but I think this is as close as you'll ever get in JavaScript:

var createReference = function (context, prop) {
  return function () { return context[prop]; };
};

var x = 5;
var refX = createReference(this, 'x');
x = 6;

alert(refX()); // alerts 6

Edit:

In your updated scenario it would be better to use a closure directly, so that you don't have to use a string of the variable name:

var createReference = function (context, func) {
    return function () { return func.call(context); }
};

Provider = function() {
};
Provider.prototype.x = 5;
Provider.prototype.getXRef = function() {

    return createReference(this, function () { return this.x; });

    // OR if you happen to be running in a 
    // JavaScript 1.8 environment like Firefox 3+,
    // you can use "expression closures" for more
    // concise code:

    // return createReference(this, function () this.x);
};
Provider.prototype.incrementX = function() {
    this.x = this.x + 1;
};

var provider = new Provider();
var refX = provider.getXRef();
provider.incrementX();
alert(refX()); // alerts 6
  • Yep, good alternatives. But javascript is not type save anyhow and there will be no 'compile-time' errors on names misuse thus I think it is better to use approach with shorter and little more readable (as for me) code in favor of approach without strings. – Mykhaylo Adamovych Apr 28 '11 at 21:42
2

In JavaScript, you can't pass primitive values (numbers, strings, etc) by reference. However, every object you pass will always be by reference. (this includes arrays)

To use your example:

var foo = { x: 5 };
var refFoo = foo;

// foo.x => 5
// refFoo.x => 5

foo.x = 6;

// foo.x => 6
// refFoo.x => 6
  • Is there a way to do this with new Number(4)? That is an object. Can you (re)set its value to 'keep it alive' and have it passed around? Something like n=new Number(4); n2=n; n2.setValue(7); alert(n); – Rudie Apr 28 '11 at 19:36
  • Yes, that will be an object. Just about everything in JS is an object technically. However, scalar values (Numbers, Strings, etc.) do not get passed by reference at all, it's just how JS works. – Dominic Barnes Apr 28 '11 at 20:04
  • I know it's an object, but how do you change a Number object's value? .setValue doesn't exist and you can't reassign a new object because then you lose the reference to n. Don't work: n2=7;, n2=new Number(7);, n2.setValue(7);. First two lose reference, third doesn't exist. How to change a number object's value? – Rudie Apr 29 '11 at 8:02
0

You can't just promote x to be a reference.

0

Only non-scalar types can be passed as reference, and will always be passed as reference:

var reference = {};
my_function(reference);
console.log(reference); // will show property - a property value

function my_function(my_reference) {
    my_reference.property = "a property value";
}

var not_a_reference = [];
my_function(not_a_reference);
console.log(not_a_reference); // will NOT show 'a value'

function my_function() {
    my_reference.push("a value");
}

Closer to your example:

function show(value) {
    alert(value.data);
}

var value = { 'data': 5 };
show(value); // alerts 5
value.data = 6;
show(value); // alerts 6
0

Since objects will always be a static reference, you can do this:

var o = {};
o.x = 5;
var oRef = o;
alert(oRef.x); // -> 5
o.x = 6;
alert(oRef.x); // -> 6

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