92

Is there a way to write the Html5 placeholder using @Html.EditorFor, or should I just use the TextBoxFor extension i.e.

@Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.Title, new { @placeholder = "Enter title here"})

Or would it make sense to write our own custom extension that can maybe use the 'Description' display attribute via DataAnnotations (similar to this)?

Of course, then the same question applies to 'autofocus' as well.

68

You may take a look at the following article for writing a custom DataAnnotationsModelMetadataProvider.

And here's another, more ASP.NET MVC 3ish way to proceed involving the newly introduced IMetadataAware interface.

Start by creating a custom attribute implementing this interface:

public class PlaceHolderAttribute : Attribute, IMetadataAware
{
    private readonly string _placeholder;
    public PlaceHolderAttribute(string placeholder)
    {
        _placeholder = placeholder;
    }

    public void OnMetadataCreated(ModelMetadata metadata)
    {
        metadata.AdditionalValues["placeholder"] = _placeholder;
    }
}

And then decorate your model with it:

public class MyViewModel
{
    [PlaceHolder("Enter title here")]
    public string Title { get; set; }
}

Next define a controller:

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        return View(new MyViewModel());
    }
}

A corresponding view:

@model MyViewModel
@using (Html.BeginForm())
{
    @Html.EditorFor(x => x.Title)
    <input type="submit" value="OK" />
}

And finally the editor template (~/Views/Shared/EditorTemplates/string.cshtml):

@{
    var placeholder = string.Empty;
    if (ViewData.ModelMetadata.AdditionalValues.ContainsKey("placeholder"))
    {
        placeholder = ViewData.ModelMetadata.AdditionalValues["placeholder"] as string;
    }
}
<span>
    @Html.Label(ViewData.ModelMetadata.PropertyName)
    @Html.TextBox("", ViewData.TemplateInfo.FormattedModelValue, new { placeholder = placeholder })
</span>
  • thanks for the info (and a great example) of the IMetadataAware interface! – seekay Apr 28 '11 at 21:48
  • 4
    is this still valid for MVC3? I noticed a new [Display(Prompt = "type watermark here")] in MVC3 but could not make it work. any idea? – smnbss Jun 16 '11 at 15:56
  • 2
    @smnbss You are correct. See my answer to see how to make Prompt work. – Daniel Liuzzi Jul 5 '11 at 6:04
  • 6
    wow that much work for doing a placeholder? has to be something simpler :S – krilovich Oct 8 '13 at 15:00
  • There is, look at some of the answers bellow. The Pax has a good one. – Termato Feb 5 '15 at 20:51
120

As smnbss comments in Darin Dimitrov's answer, Prompt exists for exactly this purpose, so there is no need to create a custom attribute. From the the documentation:

Gets or sets a value that will be used to set the watermark for prompts in the UI.

To use it, just decorate your view model's property like so:

[Display(Prompt = "numbers only")]
public int Age { get; set; }

This text is then conveniently placed in ModelMetadata.Watermark. Out of the box, the default template in MVC 3 ignores the Watermark property, but making it work is really simple. All you need to do is tweaking the default string template, to tell MVC how to render it. Just edit String.cshtml, like Darin does, except that rather than getting the watermark from ModelMetadata.AdditionalValues, you get it straight from ModelMetadata.Watermark:

~/Views/Shared/EditorTemplates/String.cshtml:

@Html.TextBox("", ViewData.TemplateInfo.FormattedModelValue, new { @class = "text-box single-line", placeholder = ViewData.ModelMetadata.Watermark })

And that is it.

As you can see, the key to make everything work is the placeholder = ViewData.ModelMetadata.Watermark bit.

If you also want to enable watermarking for multi-line textboxes (textareas), you do the same for MultilineText.cshtml:

~/Views/Shared/EditorTemplates/MultilineText.cshtml:

@Html.TextArea("", ViewData.TemplateInfo.FormattedModelValue.ToString(), 0, 0, new { @class = "text-box multi-line", placeholder = ViewData.ModelMetadata.Watermark })
  • 6
    @Brett There is, indeed. EditorFor() is a templated helper introduced in MVC 2. At first glance it might seem to do the same thing as TextBox(), but it gives you the big advantage of allowing you to control exactly how you want your HTML generated. My answer is based on this feature to "teach" MVC what to do with the Prompt attribute. For more information on these templates, you can refer to this great post by Brad Wilson: bradwilson.typepad.com/blog/2009/10/… – Daniel Liuzzi Sep 20 '11 at 19:18
  • 2
    @DotNetWise I'm not sure why you say that; all string parameters of DisplayAttribute (including Prompt) are localizable. You just need to specify the ResourceType in your annotation: [Display(ResourceType = typeof(PeopleResources), Prompt = "AgePrompt")]. And that's it. Watermark text now comes from key AgeGroup in resource PeopleResources. – Daniel Liuzzi Jan 7 '12 at 11:00
  • 1
    What if you are not using .resx resources but i18N .po localization system? – Adaptabi Feb 17 '12 at 13:24
  • 3
    @FrancisRodgers EditorTemplates folder is not there by default; you just create in your Views\Shared folder (or Views\{ControllerName} if you want it to be specific to a certain controller). You then place you place your .cshtml templates inside this folder and you should be good to go. – Daniel Liuzzi Feb 5 '13 at 5:05
  • 2
    @RobertIvanc I have edited the answer and reverted the edit made by Raleigh Buckner that cause the problems you and Ted reported. Thanks. – Daniel Liuzzi May 22 '15 at 12:22
22

I actually prefer to use the display name for the placeholder text majority of the time. Here is an example of using the DisplayName:

  @Html.TextBoxFor(x => x.FirstName, true, null, new { @class = "form-control", placeholder = Html.DisplayNameFor(x => x.FirstName) })
  • 1
    There is a special data annotation Prompt for a watermark. And DisplayName is for field label. It's a bad idea to mix them. Use right things for right tasks. Look at my answer. – Mike Eshva Oct 23 '14 at 22:09
  • 1
    thanks, that's what i was looking for, simple and to the point when we can get display name then why add more classes – saqibahmad Jan 8 '15 at 15:56
  • This will double-escape the text provided by DisplayName - not a good solution for example languages with accents like french. – marapet Apr 25 '17 at 14:06
3

I've wrote such a simple class:

public static class WatermarkExtension
{
    public static MvcHtmlString WatermarkFor<TModel, TValue>(this HtmlHelper<TModel> html, Expression<Func<TModel, TValue>> expression)
    {
        var watermark = ModelMetadata.FromLambdaExpression(expression, html.ViewData).Watermark;
        var htmlEncoded = HttpUtility.HtmlEncode(watermark);
        return new MvcHtmlString(htmlEncoded);
    }
}

The usage as such:

@Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.AddressSuffix, new {placeholder = Html.WatermarkFor(model => model.AddressSuffix)})

And property in a viewmodel:

[Display(ResourceType = typeof (Resources), Name = "AddressSuffixLabel", Prompt = "AddressSuffixPlaceholder")]
public string AddressSuffix
{
    get { return _album.AddressSuffix; }
    set { _album.AddressSuffix = value; }
}

Notice Prompt parameter. In this case I use strings from resources for localization but you can use just strings, just avoid ResourceType parameter.

  • Just decompiled DisplayNameFor method and made an analog for the watermark. – Mike Eshva Oct 23 '14 at 22:10
  • Hi, can you please change your method MvcHtmlString WatermarkFor() to use DisplayName attribute value if Display -> Prompt value is not specified? – Sasa Tancev Mar 20 '15 at 11:59
  • Where do you save your WatermarkExtension class so that it can then be used as you described? Html.WatermarkFor(model => model.AddressSuffix) – Craig Gjerdingen Apr 17 '15 at 4:17
3

I use this way with Resource file (don't need Prompt anymore !)

@Html.TextBoxFor(m => m.Name, new 
{
     @class = "form-control",
     placeholder = @Html.DisplayName(@Resource.PleaseTypeName),
     autofocus = "autofocus",
     required = "required"
})
1

Here is a solution I made using the above ideas that can be used for TextBoxFor and PasswordFor:

public static class HtmlHelperEx
{
    public static MvcHtmlString TextBoxWithPlaceholderFor<TModel, TProperty>(this HtmlHelper<TModel> htmlHelper,
        Expression<Func<TModel, TProperty>> expression, object htmlAttributes)
    {
        var metadata = ModelMetadata.FromLambdaExpression(expression, htmlHelper.ViewData);
        return htmlHelper.TextBoxFor(expression, htmlAttributes.AddAttribute("placeholder", metadata.Watermark));

    }

    public static MvcHtmlString PasswordWithPlaceholderFor<TModel, TProperty>(this HtmlHelper<TModel> htmlHelper,
        Expression<Func<TModel, TProperty>> expression, object htmlAttributes)
    {
        var metadata = ModelMetadata.FromLambdaExpression(expression, htmlHelper.ViewData);
        return htmlHelper.PasswordFor(expression, htmlAttributes.AddAttribute("placeholder", metadata.Watermark));

    }
}

public static class HtmlAttributesHelper
{
    public static IDictionary<string, object> AddAttribute(this object htmlAttributes, string name, object value)
    {
        var dictionary = htmlAttributes == null ? new Dictionary<string, object>() : htmlAttributes.ToDictionary();
        if (!String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(name) && value != null && !String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(value.ToString()))
            dictionary.Add(name, value);
        return dictionary;
    }

    public static IDictionary<string, object> ToDictionary(this object obj)
    {
        return TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(obj)
            .Cast<PropertyDescriptor>()
            .ToDictionary(property => property.Name, property => property.GetValue(obj));
    }
}
0

I think create a custom EditorTemplate is not good solution, beause you need to care about many possible tepmlates for different cases: strings, numsers, comboboxes and so on. Other solution is custom extention to HtmlHelper.

Model:

public class MyViewModel
{
    [PlaceHolder("Enter title here")]
    public string Title { get; set; }
}

Html helper extension:

   public static MvcHtmlString BsEditorFor<TModel, TValue>(this HtmlHelper<TModel> htmlHelper,
    Expression<Func<TModel, TValue>> expression, string htmlClass = "")
{
    var modelMetadata = ModelMetadata.FromLambdaExpression(expression, htmlHelper.ViewData);
    var metadata = modelMetadata;

    var viewData = new
    {
        HtmlAttributes = new
            {
                @class = htmlClass,
                placeholder = metadata.Watermark,
            }
    };
    return htmlHelper.EditorFor(expression, viewData);

}

A corresponding view:

@Html.BsEditorFor(x => x.Title)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.