10

Given the below:

object.addEventListen(eventType01,handler01);
object.addEventListen(eventType01,handler01);

object.removeEventListener(eventType01,handler01);

How many event listeners for eventType01 are on object? One or zero?

3
  • 4
    Questions like this are usually faster to simply test and see what happens than to ask. Not criticizing your question (it's more knowledge on SO) but just pointing that out.
    – jhocking
    Apr 28, 2011 at 21:52
  • 2
    @jhocking as the answer points out (through all the comments), there's more to this than any simple test could show. Maybe it's not really a good example of a question that can be "simply tested".
    – cregox
    May 18, 2011 at 21:57
  • 1
    What the comments point out is that there was more background than he explained, and his real question wasn't the question he asked. So what he should have asked was "I tested and got such and such result. Is this result normal behavior?"
    – jhocking
    May 18, 2011 at 22:29

1 Answer 1

27

Zero. If you call addEventListener, using the exact same arguments more than once all subsequent calls after the first "silently fail." Call add as many times as you want, but that single remove will wipe the listener away.

EDIT: Another thing to keep in mind is that there's no penalty to calling multiple identical removeEventListener() functions on the same object, aside from needless performance overhead. No deadly error will occur, it will simply "silently fail" much the same way as repeated identical addEventListener calls will.

EDIT 2: To answer @ThomasM :: if your listener "fires twice" then you do not have exactly the same listener. Try putting this quick and dirty code on frame 1 in a fla that has one square movieclip as a child:

import flash.events.*
function foo(e):void{
    trace("hi");
}

this.addEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK,foo);
this.addEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK,foo);
this.addEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK,foo);

Notice that your output when you click the movieclip is precisely one trace action.

Now add this line to the end of the code

this.removeEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK,foo);

Even though you added foo as a listener for click 3 times, this one call kills the listener completely.

So if you're experiencing an issue where "the same listener" fire twice then probably what you're doing is something like this:

this.addEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK, function(e){
    trace("hi");
});

this.addEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK, function(e){
    trace("hi");
});

That will definitely "fire twice" because the listener functions ARE NOT THE SAME. They perform the same actions but they do not reference identical positions in memory. They do not point to the same function object. Furthermore this is highly bad practice because you have no way to actually remove those listeners. How would you do it? You have no reference to them.

10
  • @scriptocalypse +1 - precisely.
    – Marty
    Apr 28, 2011 at 21:42
  • 1
    The latter point he makes in his edit I take advantage of often. Sometimes instead of keeping track of which event listeners are currently active I simply remove every possible event listener.
    – jhocking
    Apr 28, 2011 at 21:49
  • Thanks for the answer. I'm working out how careful I have to be with a queue of commands that all talk to the server, and all add (and then remove) the same event listeners to get the return data. Apr 29, 2011 at 13:55
  • 2
    Then why does the function fire twice if you add two exactly the same listeners?
    – ThomasM
    May 6, 2011 at 16:01
  • 1
    @ThomasM So what you have then is one singleton to which you're adding the "same" listener function but from two different instances of a Class? If that's the case then the two functions are not identical, because their scope is not identical. You should always remove a listener that you no longer need (such as when the object is supposed to be "gone"). May 9, 2011 at 13:46

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