2

Task

I am trying to import tables situated in a single excel sheet into an R object as efficiently as possible (list will be fine, as I can take the rest of the calculations from there).

Nuance

The tables are actually excel ranges not excel tables, but they are structured and look like tables: here is an example of an excel range that should be imported as a table in R:

enter image description here

Ranges(In a table form) are not of the same length and can be situated anywhere in the same sheet.

Reproducible Example

Here you can find a toy example (.xlsx file) to play with:

What I have tried

Here is the code that I have written to import excel tables into R. This is inefficient method as it requires to convert all excel ranges into tables before running this code to import them to a list in R:

library(purrr)
library(XLConnect)

wb <- loadWorkbook("example.xlsx")

tables <- map(1:100,function(x) tryCatch(readTable(wb,
                                         sheet = "Sheet1",
                                         table = paste0("Table",x)),
                                         error = function(e) NA)
              )

Question

Is there a better (more efficient) way of importing ranges in one excel sheet into an R structure by taking excel file as given and running all computations/transformations in R. Any packages are welcomed!

Thank you very much in advance.

2 Answers 2

3

I'm not sure if I'm doing it using the best way, but to solve a similar problem in one of my projects. I wrote some utility functions to deal with it.You can see those functions here

The logic behind the splits is that whenever there is a row or column that only contains NA, the split will be created on the row or column. And this process will be done for a certain times.

Anyway, if you load all the functions I wrote, you can use the codes below:

Read Data

library(tidyverse)
table_raw<- readxl::read_excel("example.xlsx",col_names = FALSE,col_types = "text")

Display data Shape

# This is a custom function I wrote
display_table_shape(table_raw)

enter image description here

Split data into separate data frames.

split_table <- table_raw %>%
    split_df(complexity = 2) # another custom function I wrote

After the original data frame is split, you can do more processing using for loop or map functions.

Data Cleaning

map(split_table, function(df){
    df <- df[-1,]
    set_1row_colname(df) %>% # another function I wrote
        mutate_all(as.numeric)
})

Result

[[1]]
# A tibble: 8 x 4
     aa    bb     cc     dd
  <dbl> <dbl>  <dbl>  <dbl>
1 0.197 0.321 0.265  0.0748
2 0.239 0.891 0.0308 0.453 
3 0.300 0.779 0.780  0.213 
4 0.132 0.138 0.612  0.0362
5 0.834 0.697 0.879  0.571 
6 0.956 0.807 0.741  0.936 
7 0.359 0.536 0.0902 0.764 
8 0.403 0.315 0.593  0.840 

[[2]]
# A tibble: 4 x 4
     aa    bb     cc      dd
  <dbl> <dbl>  <dbl>   <dbl>
1 0.136 0.347 0.603  0.542  
2 0.790 0.672 0.0808 0.795  
3 0.589 0.338 0.837  0.00968
4 0.513 0.766 0.553  0.189  

[[3]]
# A tibble: 8 x 4
      aa     bb    cc    dd
   <dbl>  <dbl> <dbl> <dbl>
1 0.995  0.105  0.106 0.530
2 0.372  0.306  0.190 0.609
3 0.508  0.987  0.585 0.233
4 0.0800 0.851  0.215 0.761
5 0.471  0.603  0.740 0.106
6 0.395  0.0808 0.571 0.266
7 0.908  0.739  0.245 0.141
8 0.534  0.313  0.663 0.824

[[4]]
# A tibble: 14 x 4
      aa     bb      cc     dd
   <dbl>  <dbl>   <dbl>  <dbl>
 1 0.225 0.993  0.0382  0.412 
 2 0.280 0.202  0.823   0.664 
 3 0.423 0.616  0.377   0.857 
 4 0.289 0.298  0.0418  0.410 
 5 0.919 0.932  0.882   0.668 
 6 0.568 0.561  0.600   0.832 
 7 0.341 0.210  0.351   0.0863
 8 0.757 0.962  0.484   0.677 
 9 0.275 0.0845 0.824   0.571 
10 0.187 0.512  0.884   0.612 
11 0.706 0.311  0.00610 0.463 
12 0.906 0.411  0.215   0.377 
13 0.629 0.317  0.0975  0.312 
14 0.144 0.644  0.906   0.353 

The functions you need to load

# utility function to get rle as a named vector
vec_rle <- function(v){
    temp <- rle(v)
    out <- temp$values
    names(out) <- temp$lengths
    return(out)
}

# utility function to map table with their columns/rows in a bigger table
make_df_index <- function(v){
    table_rle <- vec_rle(v)
    divide_points <- c(0,cumsum(names(table_rle)))
    table_index <- map2((divide_points + 1)[1:length(divide_points)-1],
                        divide_points[2:length(divide_points)],
                        ~.x:.y)
    return(table_index[table_rle])
}

# split a large table in one direction if there are blank columns or rows
split_direction <- function(df,direction = "col"){
    if(direction == "col"){
        col_has_data <- unname(map_lgl(df,~!all(is.na(.x))))
        df_mapping <- make_df_index(col_has_data)
        out <- map(df_mapping,~df[,.x])
    } else if(direction == "row"){
        row_has_data <- df %>% 
            mutate_all(~!is.na(.x)) %>%
            as.matrix() %>% 
            apply(1,any)
        df_mapping <- make_df_index(row_has_data)
        out <- map(df_mapping,~df[.x,])
    }
    return(out)
}

# split a large table into smaller tables if there are blank columns or rows
# if you still see entire rows or columns missing. Please increase complexity
split_df <- function(df,showWarnig = TRUE,complexity = 1){
    if(showWarnig){
        warning("Please don't use first row as column names.")
    }

    out <- split_direction(df,"col")

    for(i in 1 :complexity){
        out <- out %>%
            map(~split_direction(.x,"row")) %>%
            flatten() %>%
            map(~split_direction(.x,"col")) %>%
            flatten()
    }
    return(out)

}

#display the rough shape of table in a sheet with multiple tables
display_table_shape <- function(df){
    colnames(df) <- 1:ncol(df)

    out <- df %>%
        map_df(~as.numeric(!is.na(.x))) %>%
        gather(key = "x",value = "value") %>%
        mutate(x = as.numeric(x)) %>%
        group_by(x) %>%
        mutate(y = -row_number()) %>%
        ungroup() %>%
        filter(value == 1) %>%
        ggplot(aes(x = x, y = y,fill = value)) +
        geom_tile(fill = "skyblue3") +
        scale_x_continuous(position = "top") +
        theme_void() +
        theme(legend.position="none",
              panel.border = element_rect(colour = "black", fill=NA, size=2))
    return(out)
}

# set first row as column names for a data frame and remove the original first row
set_1row_colname <- function(df){
    colnames(df) <- as.character(df[1,])
    out <- df[-1,]
    return(out)
}
1
  • Nice solution! Thank you for sharing. Although it does a pretty good job, I was hoping to find some custom-based function inside any package that does this automatically. If noting shorter comes along, I will use this. Appreciated! Oct 6, 2019 at 2:45
0

I had a similar problem, this is how I solved it. Note, it loses some of the benefit of yusuzech's answer, in that it does require you to specify the ranges of interest. On the flip side, it may be more efficient to code and more adaptable to different situations.

# specify the ranges you want to import from the excel sheet
v_ranges <- c("A3:F54",   "H3:M54",   "O3:T54",   "V3:AA54",  "AC3:AH54")

# specify the names of the dataframes
v_names <- c("21Q3", "21Q2", "21Q1", "20Q4", "20Q3")

# specify sheet and path
v_path_file <- "my_path/my_excel_file.xlsx"
v_sheet <- "my_sheet_name"

# define the import function, with v_ranges as your ranges of interest, v_path_file as the excel workbook you want to import from, and v_sheet the sheet name of the file
f_import_excel_by_range <- function(.x) {
  janitor::clean_names(
    readxl::read_excel(v_path_file,
             sheet = v_sheet,
             range = .x, 
             col_names = TRUE, na = c(" ", "NA"), trim_ws = TRUE, skip = 1)
  )
}

my_file_name <- 
  purrr::map(v_ranges, f_import_excel_by_range) %>%
  purrr::set_names(paste0("my_file_name_",v_names))

# extract databases to the environment
base::invisible(base::list2env(my_file_name, .GlobalEnv))

I believe this function can be improved by including the path and file as well as the sheet name in the function. If I sleuth that out, I will edit. Feedback welcome.

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