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[expr.sub]/4 allows an initializer-list to be passed as an argument of operator[] for an object of class type. What would be a practical example using this technique?

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    Why do you tag language-lawyer? I don't think the answer to this question can be found in the standard. – L. F. Oct 7 '19 at 0:31
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    I'm sorry, but the standard allowing one thing doesn't necessarily mean you can easily find a practical example of its usage. The fact that the standard allows something isn't inherently language lawyering. I believe your actual question is "what is the rationale for allowing a braced-init-list in []", which isn't a language-lawyer question. If not, then you should clarify your question. – L. F. Oct 7 '19 at 12:20
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    This question is being discussed on Meta. – Wai Ha Lee Oct 7 '19 at 13:38
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    eel.is/c++draft/over.sub has an example – Mat Oct 7 '19 at 14:14
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    A map with the key being a tuple seems like an obvious case – M.M Oct 8 '19 at 10:58
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I think it can be used to subscript a multi-dimensional array if you really want to avoid abusing operator(), something like this:

template <class T, std::size_t N>
class Multi_array {
public:
    // ...
    reference operator[](const std::array<std::size_t, N>& index)
    {
        return elems[flatten(index)];
    }
    const_reference operator[](const std::array<std::size_t, N>& index) const
    {
        return elems[flatten(index)];
    }
    // ...
};

then you can use arr[{3, 1, 4}].

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