9

As of Java 9, methods in an interface can be private. A private method can be static or an instance method. Since private methods can only be used in the methods of the interface itself, their use is limited to being helper methods for the other methods of the interface.

Cay S. Horstmann, Core Java Volume I - Fundamentals

I get that we can put the common functionality in the private methods and not make it accessible to public. But we can have two kind of private methods here:

  1. private
  2. private static

Using private static methods is understandable, but when should we use private methods? We are not dealing with instances here as this is an interface, so why creating private methods is allowed? Don't we need only private static methods?

4
  • An interface may include methods that other instance methods call, but are not intended for public consumption. – Dave Newton Oct 7 '19 at 1:52
  • 2
    Try calling the interface's private instance method in the class that implements the interface. – Abra Oct 7 '19 at 1:55
  • 1
    Such a private method could call other methods from the interface, so they aren't equivalent to or replaceable by private static methods. – Mark Rotteveel Oct 7 '19 at 12:13
  • default methods perhaps – Maurice Perry Oct 7 '19 at 13:07
2

OK, another attempt at actually answering OP's questions. When you need to call another non-static method on the interface from a private method, the private method cannot be static. For example, there would be a compilation error if the private method below was static:

public interface InterfaceWithMethods {
    public default void doSomething() {
        doSomethingCommon();
    }

    public default void doSomethingElse() {
        doSomethingCommon();
    }

    public void actuallyDoSomething();

    private void doSomethingCommon() {
        System.out.println("Do something first.");
        actuallyDoSomething();
    }
}
4
  • Why is that relevant? You could also implement every method as "public default". The question is about the why/with which intention would you chose implementation x or y over z - not how. – Florian Salihovic Oct 7 '19 at 13:48
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    @FlorianSalihovic you would choose non-static over static when you need to call another method from this private method. Isn't that the why? – jingx Oct 7 '19 at 13:59
  • You are asking the wrong question. The visibility of methods is chosen to narrow down or widen the possibilities on how objects interact with each other. It is important as developers communicating intend about how their code should/must/can be used. You could implement everything in static methods or use no static method at all. The question is important as we need to think about the consequences of having other objects/classes access to functionality, which should be not be accessible at all. – Florian Salihovic Oct 7 '19 at 14:41
  • 2
    @FlorianSalihovic But as I have learned from people's comments, OP was not asking about visibility or when to use static vs non-static, instead they were asking why non-static private methods are even allowed on interfaces when private static seemingly suffices. My answer provided a use case where only a non-static method would work. – jingx Oct 7 '19 at 15:12
3

Interfaces are used to define an object's behaviour. This means all of the interface's methods are exposed. When using default methods, we can provide standard implementations of the defined methods, offering code reuse across class boundaries.

In some cases, functionality is required (perhaps just for code reuse in different default methods) but should not be exposed because it would pollute class'/object's namespaces. This is where private default methods come in handy. Examples private default methods could be factories, validations or default state handling.

package com.company;

import java.util.List;
import java.util.function.Predicate;
import java.util.stream.Collectors;

public class Main {

  public static void main(final String[] args) {
    var messages =
        List.of(
            MessageQueue.newSubject("Message 1"),
            MessageQueue.newTopic("Message 2"),
            MessageQueue.newTopic("Message 3"));
    final MessageQueueAdapter1 queue1 = () -> messages;
    inspectQueue(queue1);
    final MessageQueueAdapter2 queue2 = () -> messages;
    inspectQueue(queue2);
  }

  private static void inspectQueue(final MessageQueue queue) {
    final List<Message> messagesWithSubject = queue.getMessagesWithSubject();
    assert messagesWithSubject.size() == 1 : "expected one message with 'Subject'";
    final List<Message> messagesWithTopic = queue.getMessagesWithTopic();
    assert messagesWithTopic.size() == 2 : "expected two message with 'Topic'";
    assert !queue.getMessages().isEmpty() && 3 == queue.getMessages().size()
        : "expected three messages in total";
  }

  @FunctionalInterface
  interface Message {
    private static boolean isPrefixedBy(final String message, final String prefix) {
      return message != null && !message.isEmpty() && message.startsWith(prefix);
    }

    default boolean hasSubject() {
      return isPrefixedBy(this.getMessage(), MessageQueue.PREFIX_SUBJECT);
    }

    default boolean hasTopic() {
      return isPrefixedBy(this.getMessage(), MessageQueue.PREFIX_TOPIC);
    }

    String getMessage();
  }

  interface MessageQueue {
    String PREFIX_SUBJECT = "Subject: ";

    String PREFIX_TOPIC = "Topic: ";

    private static Message newMessage(final String message) {
      return () -> message;
    }

    static Message newSubject(final String message) {
      return newMessage(PREFIX_SUBJECT + message);
    }

    static Message newTopic(final String message) {
      return newMessage(PREFIX_TOPIC + message);
    }

    List<Message> getMessages();

    List<Message> getMessagesWithSubject();

    List<Message> getMessagesWithTopic();
  }

  @FunctionalInterface
  interface MessageQueueAdapter1 extends MessageQueue {
    private static List<Message> filterBy(
        final List<Message> messages, final Predicate<Message> predicate) {
      return messages.stream().filter(predicate).collect(Collectors.toList());
    }

    /** {@inheritDoc} */
    @Override
    default List<Message> getMessagesWithSubject() {
      return filterBy(this.getMessages(), Message::hasSubject);
    }

    /** {@inheritDoc} */
    @Override
    default List<Message> getMessagesWithTopic() {
      return filterBy(this.getMessages(), Message::hasTopic);
    }
  }

  @FunctionalInterface
  interface MessageQueueAdapter2 extends MessageQueue {
    private List<Message> filterBy(final Predicate<Message> predicate) {
      return this.getMessages().stream().filter(predicate).collect(Collectors.toList());
    }

    /** {@inheritDoc} */
    @Override
    default List<Message> getMessagesWithSubject() {
      return filterBy(Message::hasSubject);
    }

    /** {@inheritDoc} */
    @Override
    default List<Message> getMessagesWithTopic() {
      return filterBy(Message::hasTopic);
    }
  }
}

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