302

I'm encountering a problem sending files stored in a database back to the user in ASP.NET MVC. What I want is a view listing two links, one to view the file and let the mimetype sent to the browser determine how it should be handled, and the other to force a download.

If I choose to view a file called SomeRandomFile.bak and the browser doesn't have an associated program to open files of this type, then I have no problem with it defaulting to the download behavior. However, if I choose to view a file called SomeRandomFile.pdf or SomeRandomFile.jpg I want the file to simply open. But I also want to keep a download link off to the side so that I can force a download prompt regardless of the file type. Does this make sense?

I have tried FileStreamResult and it works for most files, its constructor doesn't accept a filename by default, so unknown files are assigned a file name based on the URL (which does not know the extension to give based on content type). If I force the file name by specifying it, I lose the ability for the browser to open the file directly and I get a download prompt. Has anyone else encountered this?

These are the examples of what I've tried so far.

//Gives me a download prompt.
return File(document.Data, document.ContentType, document.Name);

//Opens if it is a known extension type, downloads otherwise (download has bogus name and missing extension)
return new FileStreamResult(new MemoryStream(document.Data), document.ContentType);

//Gives me a download prompt (lose the ability to open by default if known type)
return new FileStreamResult(new MemoryStream(document.Data), document.ContentType) {FileDownloadName = document.Name};

Any suggestions?


UPDATE: This questions seems to strike a chord with a lot of people, so I thought I'd post an update. The warning on the accepted answer below that was added by Oskar regarding international characters is completely valid, and I've hit it a few times due to using the ContentDisposition class. I've since updated my implementation to fix this. While the code below is from my most recent incarnation of this problem in an ASP.NET Core (Full Framework) app, it should work with minimal changes in an older MVC application as well since I'm using the System.Net.Http.Headers.ContentDispositionHeaderValue class.

using System.Net.Http.Headers;

public IActionResult Download()
{
    Document document = ... //Obtain document from database context

    //"attachment" means always prompt the user to download
    //"inline" means let the browser try and handle it
    var cd = new ContentDispositionHeaderValue("attachment")
    {
        FileNameStar = document.FileName
    };
    Response.Headers.Add(HeaderNames.ContentDisposition, cd.ToString());

    return File(document.Data, document.ContentType);
}

// an entity class for the document in my database 
public class Document
{
    public string FileName { get; set; }
    public string ContentType { get; set; }
    public byte[] Data { get; set; }
    //Other properties left out for brevity
}
| improve this question | | | | |
428
public ActionResult Download()
{
    var document = ...
    var cd = new System.Net.Mime.ContentDisposition
    {
        // for example foo.bak
        FileName = document.FileName, 

        // always prompt the user for downloading, set to true if you want 
        // the browser to try to show the file inline
        Inline = false, 
    };
    Response.AppendHeader("Content-Disposition", cd.ToString());
    return File(document.Data, document.ContentType);
}

NOTE: This example code above fails to properly account for international characters in the filename. See RFC6266 for the relevant standardization. I believe recent versions of ASP.Net MVC's File() method and the ContentDispositionHeaderValue class properly accounts for this. - Oskar 2016-02-25

| improve this answer | | | | |
  • 6
    If I recall correctly, it can be un-quoted so long as the filename has no spaces (I ran mine through HttpUtility.UrlEncode() to achieve this). – Keith Williams Apr 28 '12 at 11:54
  • 21
    Note: If you use this and set Inline = true be sure NOT to use the 3-param overload of File() that takes the file-name as the 3rd param. It will work in IE, but Chrome will report a duplicate header and refuse to present the image. – Faust May 13 '13 at 10:29
  • 73
    What type is var document = ... ? – TTT Jul 18 '13 at 8:36
  • 6
    @user1103990, it's your domain model. – Darin Dimitrov Jul 18 '13 at 11:28
  • 2
    Using MVC 5, there is no need for the content-disposition header anymore, as it is already part of the response header. But I only get a download dialog in FF, no dialog in chrome and IE – Legends Apr 9 '16 at 21:52
123

I had trouble with the accepted answer due to no type hinting on the "document" variable: var document = ... So I'm posting what worked for me as an alternative in case anybody else is having trouble.

public ActionResult DownloadFile()
{
    string filename = "File.pdf";
    string filepath = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory + "/Path/To/File/" + filename;
    byte[] filedata = System.IO.File.ReadAllBytes(filepath);
    string contentType = MimeMapping.GetMimeMapping(filepath);

    var cd = new System.Net.Mime.ContentDisposition
    {
        FileName = filename,
        Inline = true,
    };

    Response.AppendHeader("Content-Disposition", cd.ToString());

    return File(filedata, contentType);
}
| improve this answer | | | | |
  • 4
    The document variable was just a class (POCO) representing the information about the document you wanted to return. That was asked on the answer accepted as well. It could come from an ORM, from a manually built SQL query, from the file system (as yours pulls information from), or some other data store. It was irrelevant for the original question where your document bytes/filename/mime type came from so it was left out to not muddy the code. Thanks for contributing an example using just the file system though. – Nick Albrecht Jun 17 '15 at 17:54
  • 1
    This solution doesn't work correctly when the filename contains international characters outside US-ASCII. – Oskar Berggren Feb 25 '16 at 23:49
  • Thanks, Saved my day :) – Dipesh Oct 25 '16 at 11:34
  • 1
    An alternative to AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory is System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Server.MapPath("~"), this may work better on a real server compared to a local machine. – Chris Thompson Feb 11 '17 at 20:29
14

Darin Dimitrov's answer is correct. Just an addition:

Response.AppendHeader("Content-Disposition", cd.ToString()); may cause the browser to fail rendering the file if your response already contains a "Content-Disposition" header. In that case, you may want to use:

Response.Headers.Add("Content-Disposition", cd.ToString());
| improve this answer | | | | |
  • I find that the content-type also have influence, for pdf file, if I set content-type as System.Net.Mime.MediaTypeNames.Application.Octet, it'll force download even when I set Inline = true, but if I set as Response.ContentType = MimeMapping.GetMimeMapping(filePath), that is application/pdf, it can open correctly rather than download – yu yang Jian Oct 17 '18 at 5:37
  • Response.Headers.Add require IIS integrated pipeline mode. Additionaly, even if the app pool is set as integrated, it will throw an exception. Solution. Use Response.AddHeader. See SO thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/22313167/… – roland May 28 '19 at 9:11
11

To view file (txt for example):

return File("~/TextFileInRootDir.txt", MediaTypeNames.Text.Plain);

To download file (txt for example):

return File("~/TextFileInRootDir.txt", MediaTypeNames.Text.Plain, "TextFile.txt");

note: to download file we should pass fileDownloadName argument

| improve this answer | | | | |
  • The only problem with this approach is that the file name is only provided if you use the method that forces a download. It does not allow me to send the correct file name when I want to let the browser determine how to open the file. So the external app will attempt to use my URL as the file name. Which will usually be some sort of id for the document in the database, typically with out a file extension. This makes for a pretty poor the name does not match the URL used to access the file, for the scenario is that if you don't provide. – Nick Albrecht May 4 '16 at 20:22
  • Using the Inline property on the Content-Disposition allows me to separate the ability of setting the file name from the behavior of forcing the download or not. – Nick Albrecht May 4 '16 at 20:23
3

I believe this answer is cleaner, (based on https://stackoverflow.com/a/3007668/550975)

    public ActionResult GetAttachment(long id)
    {
        FileAttachment attachment;
        using (var db = new TheContext())
        {
            attachment = db.FileAttachments.FirstOrDefault(x => x.Id == id);
        }

        return File(attachment.FileData, "application/force-download", Path.GetFileName(attachment.FileName));
    }
| improve this answer | | | | |
  • 9
    Not recommended, Content-Disposition is the prefered method for clarity and compatability. stackoverflow.com/questions/10615797/… – Nick Albrecht Nov 12 '13 at 19:04
  • Thanks for that. Although I changed the MIME type to application/octet-stream and that still caused the file to be downloaded rather than shown, and it seems to be compatible. – Serj Sagan Nov 13 '13 at 2:14
  • 1
    Lying about the content type sounds like a really bad idea. Some browsers depend on correct content type to suggest applications for the user in the "save-or-open" dialog. – Oskar Berggren Feb 25 '16 at 23:51
  • If your intent is to have the browser suggest an app then that's fine, but this question is specifically about forcing the download... – Serj Sagan Feb 26 '16 at 0:04
  • @SerjSagan I think it's more about circumventing the browsers behaviour of defaulting to viewing certain file types directly or using a plugin, instead of offering the choice between save/open. Didn't try with e.g. JPEG right now, so not sure on exact behaviour though. – Oskar Berggren Mar 8 '16 at 1:22
2

FileVirtualPath --> Research\Global Office Review.pdf

public virtual ActionResult GetFile()
{
    return File(FileVirtualPath, "application/force-download", Path.GetFileName(FileVirtualPath));
}
| improve this answer | | | | |
  • 5
    This was already mentioned in the previous answer and is not recommended. See the following question for more details on why. stackoverflow.com/questions/10615797/… – Nick Albrecht Jan 28 '14 at 22:36
  • 1
    This way it doesnt use resource on server by loading file into memory on server, am i correct? – Ian Jowett Aug 13 '15 at 13:40
  • 1
    I believe so, as no need for you r right @CrashOverride – Bishoy Hanna Aug 13 '15 at 23:16
0

Below code worked for me for getting a pdf file from an API service and response it out to the browser - hope it helps;

public async Task<FileResult> PrintPdfStatements(string fileName)
    {
         var fileContent = await GetFileStreamAsync(fileName);
         var fileContentBytes = ((MemoryStream)fileContent).ToArray();
         return File(fileContentBytes, System.Net.Mime.MediaTypeNames.Application.Pdf);
    }
| improve this answer | | | | |
  • 1
    Thanks for the answer. You missed the part where I was looking for a solution that included the ability to specify the name of the file. You're just returning bytes, so the name would be inferred from the URL. I was using PDF as an example, but I needed it to work for multiple other file types too in my case. I should mention that your solution would work so long as you're using the .NET Framework 4.x and MVC <= 5. If you're running against .NET Core, your best bet is to use Microsoft.AspNetCore.StaticFiles.FileExtensionContentTypeProvider – Nick Albrecht May 11 '18 at 19:04
  • @NickAlbrecht I did not use .Net Core - the above example was for pdf response on a browser. However if you want to download try: File(fileContentBytes, System.Net.Mime.MediaTypeNames.Application.Pdf, "your file name"). I am not sure though if you got your answer. please let me know if this helps.Thanks for the .Net Core suggestion though. Also if you have found my answer useful please add a vote. – Jonny Boy May 11 '18 at 20:58
  • I've already solved the issue long ago with the answer I've marked as accepted. I was more pointing out a few caveats in case you found them useful. My original question was 2011, so this is quite dated by now. – Nick Albrecht May 11 '18 at 23:21
  • @NickAlbrecht Thank you. I was not aware you solved it, I did see it is a very old post. I found this forum while looking for some async related answers, I am new to the async processes. i was able to solve my problem so just shared. Than you for your time. – Jonny Boy May 13 '18 at 21:52
0

If, like me, you've come to this topic via Razor components as you're learning Blazor, then you'll find you need to think a little more outside of the box to solve this problem. It's a bit of a minefield if (also like me) Blazor is your first forray into the MVC-type world, as the documentation isn't as helpful for such 'menial' tasks.

So, at the time of writing, you cannot achieve this using vanilla Blazor/Razor without embedding an MVC controller to handle the file download part an example of which is as below:

using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc;
using Microsoft.Net.Http.Headers;

[Route("api/[controller]")]
[ApiController]
public class FileHandlingController : ControllerBase
{
    [HttpGet]
    public FileContentResult Download(int attachmentId)
    {
        TaskAttachment taskFile = null;

        if (attachmentId > 0)
        {
            // taskFile = <your code to get the file>
            // which assumes it's an object with relevant properties as required below

            if (taskFile != null)
            {
                var cd = new System.Net.Http.Headers.ContentDispositionHeaderValue("attachment")
                {
                    FileNameStar = taskFile.Filename
                };

                Response.Headers.Add(HeaderNames.ContentDisposition, cd.ToString());
            }
        }

        return new FileContentResult(taskFile?.FileData, taskFile?.FileContentType);
    }
}

Next, make sure your application startup (Startup.cs) is configured to correctly use MVC and has the following line present (add it if not):

        services.AddMvc();

.. and then finally modify your component to link to the controller, for example (iterative based example using a custom class):

    <tbody>
        @foreach (var attachment in yourAttachments)
        {
        <tr>
            <td><a href="api/FileHandling?attachmentId=@attachment.TaskAttachmentId" target="_blank">@attachment.Filename</a> </td>
            <td>@attachment.CreatedUser</td>
            <td>@attachment.Created?.ToString("dd MMM yyyy")</td>
            <td><ul><li class="oi oi-circle-x delete-attachment"></li></ul></td>
        </tr>
        }
        </tbody>

Hopefully this helps anyone who struggled (like me!) to get an appropriate answer to this seemingly simple question in the realms of Blazor…!

| improve this answer | | | | |
  • While this could be useful to others encountering the same problem you did, it'd be more discoverable for them if you posted your own question with a title that indicates it's unique to Blazor, answer it yourself, and add a comment here suggesting anyone reaching this question with problems regarding blazor check out your link. I felt I was reaching even with this original question being for ASP.NET MVC, and adapting its answer to be relevant to ASP.NET Core. Blazor is a totally different beast entirely, as you've discovered. – Nick Albrecht Jan 10 at 1:19
-1

Action method needs to return FileResult with either a stream, byte[], or virtual path of the file. You will also need to know the content-type of the file being downloaded. Here is a sample (quick/dirty) utility method. Sample video link How to download files using asp.net core

[Route("api/[controller]")]
public class DownloadController : Controller
{
    [HttpGet]
    public async Task<IActionResult> Download()
    {
        var path = @"C:\Vetrivel\winforms.png";
        var memory = new MemoryStream();
        using (var stream = new FileStream(path, FileMode.Open))
        {
            await stream.CopyToAsync(memory);
        }
        memory.Position = 0;
        var ext = Path.GetExtension(path).ToLowerInvariant();
        return File(memory, GetMimeTypes()[ext], Path.GetFileName(path));
    }

    private Dictionary<string, string> GetMimeTypes()
    {
        return new Dictionary<string, string>
        {
            {".txt", "text/plain"},
            {".pdf", "application/pdf"},
            {".doc", "application/vnd.ms-word"},
            {".docx", "application/vnd.ms-word"},
            {".png", "image/png"},
            {".jpg", "image/jpeg"},
            ...
        };
    }
}
| improve this answer | | | | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.