-1

When is run this code the slice data is not replaced by the user input. But when remove the comments and run the code normally without the functions the data is replaced in the slice.

package main

import (
    "bufio"
    "fmt"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    vriendinnen := []string{"vriendin1", "vriendin2", "vriendin3"}
    koken(vriendinnen[0])
    koken(vriendinnen[1])
    koken(vriendinnen[2])

}

func koken(vriendinnen string) {
    reader := bufio.NewReader(os.Stdin)
    fmt.Print("Wat Zijn de namen van de vriendinnen: ")
    vriendinnen, _ = reader.ReadString('\n')
    // vriendinnen[1], _ = reader.ReadString('\n')
    // vriendinnen[2], _ = reader.ReadString('\n') 
}

This Works


    vriendinnen := []string{"vriendin1", "vriendin2", "vriendin3"}
    reader := bufio.NewReader(os.Stdin)
    fmt.Print("Wat Zijn de namen van de vriendinnen: ")
    vriendinnen[0], _ = reader.ReadString('\n')
    vriendinnen[1], _ = reader.ReadString('\n')
    vriendinnen[2], _ = reader.ReadString('\n')
    fmt.Println(vriendinnen)
  • 1
    You are passing copies of the slice values to koken. Modifying that copy doesn't do anything to the copy in the slice. That's expected. – Peter Oct 7 at 10:17
  • sorry for sounding stupid. But what is the right way to do this without discarding the data? i just started programming so i don't know all the rules. – ManuSwaG Oct 7 at 10:41
  • @ManuSwaG If you want koken to update the passed in string, either pass in a pointer, or have it return the new string and have the caller assign the returned string to where you want to have it. play.golang.com/p/_OzQCGcm2Pg – mkopriva Oct 7 at 11:35
1

1/ Go passes everything by value.

https://golang.org/ref/spec#Calls

In a function call, the function value and arguments are evaluated in the usual order. After they are evaluated, the parameters of the call are passed by value to the function and the called function begins execution

So to write the value of each string entry of the slices, you could make use of pointers. In this example a pointer to the value is created and passed to the function. The function updates the value stored at the pointers address.

The function is not safe to nil pointers.

package main

import (
    "bufio"
    "fmt"
    "log"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    vriendinnen := []string{"vriendin1", "vriendin2", "vriendin3"}
    koken(&vriendinnen[0])
    koken(&vriendinnen[1])
    koken(&vriendinnen[2])

    log.Println(vriendinnen)
}

func koken(vriendinnen *string) {
    reader := bufio.NewReader(os.Stdin)
    fmt.Print("Wat Zijn de namen van de vriendinnen: ")
    *vriendinnen, _ = reader.ReadString('\n')
    // vriendinnen[1], _ = reader.ReadString('\n')
    // vriendinnen[2], _ = reader.ReadString('\n')
    // reader.WriteTo(w)
}

2/ The bufio.Reader is buffered, thus failing to properly manage it can lead to data loss.

this version of the program prints some more details

package main

import (
    "bufio"
    "fmt"
    "log"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    vriendinnen := []string{"vriendin1", "vriendin2", "vriendin3"}
    koken(&vriendinnen[0])
    koken(&vriendinnen[1])
    koken(&vriendinnen[2])
    log.Println(vriendinnen)
}

func koken(vriendinnen *string) {
    reader := bufio.NewReader(os.Stdin)
    fmt.Print("Wat Zijn de namen van de vriendinnen: ")
    *vriendinnen, _ = reader.ReadString('\n')
    fmt.Println()
    log.Println(reader.Buffered())
    reader.WriteTo(os.Stdout)
}

Run it with echo -e "1\n2\n3" | go run main.go, it outputs

Wat Zijn de namen van de vriendinnen: 
2019/10/07 13:36:53 4
2
3
Wat Zijn de namen van de vriendinnen: 
2019/10/07 13:36:53 0
Wat Zijn de namen van de vriendinnen: 
2019/10/07 13:36:53 0
2019/10/07 13:36:53 [1
  ]

At first read line, the bufio.Reader instance has still 4 unread bytes into its internal buffer (https://golang.org/src/bufio/bufio.go#L32).

The 4 bytes are "2\n3"+"\n" (echo adds a trailing NL).

Those four bytes has been read from the stdin and saved into the bufio.Reader. This buffered reader and its state are lost when the function exits.

On the next read line, it outputs 0 unread bytes, in fact it has reached io.EOF on os.Stdin and does not have anything else to read.

To fix this, adjust your code to reuse the bufio.Reader.

Additionally care should be taken to properly handle errors in order to properly handle io.EOF.

package main

import (
    "bufio"
    "fmt"
    "io"
    "log"
    "os"
)

func main() {

    vriendinnen := []string{"vriendin1", "vriendin2", "vriendin3"}
    reader := bufio.NewReader(os.Stdin)
    var err error
    for i := 0; i < len(vriendinnen); i++ {
        fmt.Print("Wat Zijn de namen van de vriendinnen: ")
        vriendinnen[i], err = reader.ReadString('\n')
        if err != nil {
            if err == io.EOF {
                err = nil
            }
            break
        }
    }
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
    log.Println(vriendinnen)
}
0

Maybe the reason is that parameter passing in Go is value transfer. When you use function koken, it only pass a copy of vriendinnen[0](/[1]/[2]). Operation in the function won't influence the original value of the slice.
If you want to change the value of the slice, passing the whole slice to function koken then do change operation will solve. If you want to append to the slice, method above can't finish that job. Then you may need to use a slice as the return value of function, and assign the return value to the original slice. This is related to the structure of slice in Go.

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