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I would like to fwrite() then fread() the following struct ** whose memory has been allocated dynamically. This struct is declared as following :

typedef struct {
   int num;
   char type;
   Entity entity;
}Cell;

I declare a map of cell as following :

typedef struct {
  char name[MAX_STRING];
  int width;
  int height;
  Cell** map;
}Maze;

I allocate the map's memory as following :

maze.map = (Cell **)malloc( width*sizeof( Cell* ));

for (int  x = 0; x < width; x++ )
{
    maze.map[x] = (Cell *)malloc(sizeof( Cell )*height);
}

The thing is is i can't fwrite()/fread() my struct like this because once I would like to fread() the struct, I would not be able to allocate the proper memory space. So i decided to write the height and width first then allocate the memory then read the map. But I can't find how to write or read my map properly. I tried :

for (int x = 0; x < maze.width; ++x) {
    for (int y = 0; y < maze.height; ++y) {
        fwrite(&maze.map[x][y], sizeof(Cell), 1, file);
    }
}

But it doesn't work, otherwise i don't know how should I write/read my map.

Everything i tried doesn't give me back the map i wrote or it just crash saying me : Process finished with exit code -1073741819 (0xC0000005)

Here are the two writing and readin fuction :

void SaveMaze(Maze maze){
   FILE *file;
   char file_name[MAX_STRING];

   strcpy(file_name, maze.name);
   strcat(file_name,".save");

   file = fopen(file_name, "w");

   if(file == NULL)
   {
       perror("Error Fopen : ");
       return ;
   }
   fwrite(maze.name,sizeof(maze.name), 1, file);
   fwrite(&maze.height,sizeof(maze.height), 1, file);
   fwrite(&maze.width,sizeof(maze.width), 1, file);

   for (int x = 0; x < maze.width; ++x) {
       fwrite(&maze.map[x], sizeof(Cell), maze.height, file);
   }

   // Close the file
   fclose(file);
}


Maze LoadMaze(char * name){
   FILE *file;
   Maze maze;
   char file_name[MAX_STRING];

   strcpy(file_name, name);
   strcat(file_name,".save");

   file = fopen(file_name, "r");

   if(file == NULL) {
       perror("Error Fopen : ");
       return maze;
   }

   fread(maze.name,sizeof(maze.name), 1, file);
   fread(&maze.height,sizeof(maze.height), 1, file);
   fread(&maze.width,sizeof(maze.width), 1, file);

   maze.map = (Cell **)malloc( maze.width*sizeof( Cell* ));

   for (int  x = 0; x < maze.width; x++ )
   {
      maze.map[x] = (Cell *)malloc(sizeof( Cell )*maze.height);
   }
   for (int x = 0; x < maze.width; ++x) {
       fread(&maze.map[x], sizeof(Cell), maze.height, file);
   }
   printf("%c",maze.map[0][0].num);

   fclose (file);
   return maze;
}
int main() {
   int choice;
   int width,height;
   char name[MAX_STRING],file_name[MAX_STRING];
   Maze maze;

   do{
       printf("1. Generate a new Maze\n");
       printf("2. Load an existing maze\n");
       printf("3. Play\n");
       printf("4. Exit\n");

       scanf("%d",&choice);
       fflush(stdin);

       if(choice == 1){
           do {
               printf("What is the width of your maze (Odd number only)\n");
               scanf("%d", &width);
               fflush(stdin);
           } while (width%2 == 0);

           do {
               printf("What is the height of your maze (Odd number only)\n");
               scanf("%d", &height);
               fflush(stdin);
           } while (height%2 == 0);

           printf("What is the name of the maze\n");
           fgets(name,sizeof(name),stdin);
           // Remove the \n from the name
           name[strcspn(name, "\n")] = 0;
           fflush(stdin);

           maze = CreateMaze(width,height,name);
           InitialyzeMaze(&maze);
           BuildMaze(&maze);
           fflush(stdin);

           SaveMaze(maze);

       }else if(choice == 2){
           //system("clear");
           //system("ls *.{save}");

           printf("What is the name of the maze you want to load ?\n");

           fgets(file_name,sizeof(file_name),stdin);
           // Remove the \n from the filename
           file_name[strcspn(file_name, "\n")] = 0;
           fflush(stdin);

           maze = LoadMaze(file_name);

       }else if(choice == 3){
           Play(&maze);
       }
   }while(choice != 4);

}

  • The loop you've shown would be the proper way to write the map. Please update your question with a minimal reproducible example which includes both writing and reading the maze. – dbush Oct 7 '19 at 17:03
  • Well i doubled tecked but it doesn't work ! I really don't know why , and the read part is the same that the write part but with fread instead. – Xilamax Oct 7 '19 at 17:47
  • Saying "the read part is the same as the write part" doesn't actually tell us anything. There are most likely nuances you are missing, and we can't know what those are unless you update your question with a piece of code that allows others to reproduce your problem. – dbush Oct 7 '19 at 17:50
  • You right , i added the full write and read method so that you can see where is my mistake ! – Xilamax Oct 7 '19 at 17:53
  • General note: There is no need to cast the return of malloc in C, it is unnecessary. See: Do I cast the result of malloc? – David C. Rankin Oct 7 '19 at 17:54
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You're mixing text data and binary data in your data file.

When you write the name, height, and width:

fprintf(file,"%s",maze.name);
fwrite(&maze.height,sizeof(maze.height), 1, file);
fwrite(&maze.width,sizeof(maze.width), 1, file);

This outputs a series of characters for the name (let's say "my_maze") followed immediately by sizeof(int) bytes for the height and sizeof(int) bytes for the width. So that's 7 bytes for the name, 4 bytes for height (assuming an int is 4 bytes), and 4 bytes for width.

Now when you read back:

fscanf(file,"%s",maze.name);
fread(&maze.height,sizeof(maze.height), 1, file);
fread(&maze.width,sizeof(maze.width), 1, file);

The %s format specifier to fscanf reads characters until it encounters whitespace. The first 7 characters get read in correctly but right after that is binary data for height so where does it stop reading? The result is that you most likely read more bytes than you indented to and now the rest of your reads are not in the correct place.

You can fix this by doing away with fprintf and fscanf by writing the entire name field with fwrite:

fwrite(maze.name,sizeof(maze.name), 1, file);

And reading it with fread:

fread(maze.name,sizeof(maze.name), 1, file);

You also have a problem here:

fwrite(&maze.map[x], sizeof(Cell), maze.height, file);

And here:

fread(&maze.map[x], sizeof(Cell), maze.height, file);

&maze.map[x] is not the address of the memory you allocated but the address of the pointer it points to. So rather than reading/writing the memory set aside for each row of cells you're reading/writing the memory used for the row of pointers for each cell. You end up reading/writing past the end of allocated memory when you do this.

Get rid of the address-of operator here to pass in the pointer to the actual memory you're reading/writing:

fwrite(maze.map[x], sizeof(Cell), maze.height, file);
...
fread(maze.map[x], sizeof(Cell), maze.height, file);
| improve this answer | |
  • Sorry i didn't notice i left it, i tried so many things i forgot i left the name writed with fprintf , but it doesn't change anything, you can just comment the line for the name and still my map is not loaded. – Xilamax Oct 7 '19 at 18:57
  • @Xilamax See my edit. You're not reading/writing the cells properly. – dbush Oct 7 '19 at 19:19
  • Omg Thank you so much , for your help !! i've been trying to fix it for hours without any results !! I though i would never get through this !! – Xilamax Oct 7 '19 at 19:22
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Since the elements in each maze item (maze.map[X]) are continuous, and are pre-allocated, you can write each 'maze' item with a single fwrite call:

for (int x = 0; x < maze.width; ++x) {
    fwrite(&maze.map[x], sizeof(Cell), maze.height, file);
}

Taking this route, you can use fread instead of fwrite to read the elements.

Side Note: Usually better to use calloc(count, sizeof(...)), instead of malloc(count*sizeof) - it will initialize the allocated memory to zeros.

| improve this answer | |
  • I don't agree with your side note. Initializing the memory may make the allocation measurably slower (depending on lot of conditions, of course). So if you know that you will reassign values to all bytes (by fread(), memcpy() or whatever) or if in binary data, 0 is no special value at all, why? – Ingo Leonhardt Oct 7 '19 at 17:32
  • First thanks for taking the time to answer my question, although i tried your proposition but it's still doesn't work. – Xilamax Oct 7 '19 at 17:48
  • @IngoLeonhardt, using calloc get you into repeatable problem. Without it, you get random data into the allocated memory. Assuming the code accidentally uses one of the variables before they are set, you will get random behavior. Very painful. On the flip side, the cost of initializing the memory, on modern computer (unless you are talking GB of data) is effectively zero. – dash-o Oct 7 '19 at 18:00
  • @Xilamax can you give more details that 'doesnot work'. Does the program crash ? hanges /produce bad data in the output file. Any error message ? – dash-o Oct 7 '19 at 18:01
  • @IngoLeonhardt - unless you are initializing Gigabytes, the difference between malloc/calloc is negligible. As a generally rule if you are allocating for something that can potentially be sparse, like a matrix, or an array, then calloc makes sense to prevent against an inadvertent access of an uninitialized value. – David C. Rankin Oct 7 '19 at 18:02

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