397

Any ideas on an async directory search using fs.readdir? I realize that we could introduce recursion and call the read directory function with the next directory to read, but I'm a little worried about it not being async...

Any ideas? I've looked at node-walk which is great, but doesn't give me just the files in an array, like readdir does. Although

Looking for output like...

['file1.txt', 'file2.txt', 'dir/file3.txt']

49 Answers 49

445

There are basically two ways of accomplishing this. In an async environment you'll notice that there are two kinds of loops: serial and parallel. A serial loop waits for one iteration to complete before it moves onto the next iteration - this guarantees that every iteration of the loop completes in order. In a parallel loop, all the iterations are started at the same time, and one may complete before another, however, it is much faster than a serial loop. So in this case, it's probably better to use a parallel loop because it doesn't matter what order the walk completes in, just as long as it completes and returns the results (unless you want them in order).

A parallel loop would look like this:

var fs = require('fs');
var path = require('path');
var walk = function(dir, done) {
  var results = [];
  fs.readdir(dir, function(err, list) {
    if (err) return done(err);
    var pending = list.length;
    if (!pending) return done(null, results);
    list.forEach(function(file) {
      file = path.resolve(dir, file);
      fs.stat(file, function(err, stat) {
        if (stat && stat.isDirectory()) {
          walk(file, function(err, res) {
            results = results.concat(res);
            if (!--pending) done(null, results);
          });
        } else {
          results.push(file);
          if (!--pending) done(null, results);
        }
      });
    });
  });
};

A serial loop would look like this:

var fs = require('fs');
var path = require('path');
var walk = function(dir, done) {
  var results = [];
  fs.readdir(dir, function(err, list) {
    if (err) return done(err);
    var i = 0;
    (function next() {
      var file = list[i++];
      if (!file) return done(null, results);
      file = path.resolve(dir, file);
      fs.stat(file, function(err, stat) {
        if (stat && stat.isDirectory()) {
          walk(file, function(err, res) {
            results = results.concat(res);
            next();
          });
        } else {
          results.push(file);
          next();
        }
      });
    })();
  });
};

And to test it out on your home directory (WARNING: the results list will be huge if you have a lot of stuff in your home directory):

walk(process.env.HOME, function(err, results) {
  if (err) throw err;
  console.log(results);
});

EDIT: Improved examples.

16
  • 12
    Beware, the "parallel loop" answer from chjj above has a bug in cases when an empty folder is walked. The fix is: var pending = list.length; if(!pending)done(null, results); // add this line! list.forEach(function(file) { ... Nov 10, 2011 at 17:29
  • 32
    I downvoted because your answer was great when you first wrote it back in 2011, but in 2014 people use open source modules and write less code themselves and contribute to the modules that they and so many other people depend on. For example try node-dir to get exactly the output required by @crawf using this line of code: require('node-dir').files(__dirname, function(err, files) { console.log(files); }); May 14, 2014 at 20:57
  • 9
    For anyone confused about the !-- syntax, a question has been asked about it
    – Tas
    Dec 17, 2015 at 0:40
  • 2
    is there a particular reason you used fs instead of fs.promises? wouldnt fs.promises be even better?
    – oldboy
    Oct 30, 2019 at 5:31
  • 7
    Adding a note that the highly upvoted comment's suggested node-dir package hasn't been updated in 5 years (checked on Nov 29th 2021).
    – mix3d
    Nov 29, 2021 at 20:34
391

This one uses the maximum amount of new, buzzwordy features available in node 8, including Promises, util/promisify, destructuring, async-await, map+reduce and more, making your co-workers scratch their heads as they try to figure out what is going on.

Node 8+

No external dependencies.

const { promisify } = require('util');
const { resolve } = require('path');
const fs = require('fs');
const readdir = promisify(fs.readdir);
const stat = promisify(fs.stat);

async function getFiles(dir) {
  const subdirs = await readdir(dir);
  const files = await Promise.all(subdirs.map(async (subdir) => {
    const res = resolve(dir, subdir);
    return (await stat(res)).isDirectory() ? getFiles(res) : res;
  }));
  return files.reduce((a, f) => a.concat(f), []);
}

Usage

getFiles(__dirname)
  .then(files => console.log(files))
  .catch(e => console.error(e));

Node 10.10+

Updated for node 10+ with even more whizbang:

const { resolve } = require('path');
const { readdir } = require('fs').promises;

async function getFiles(dir) {
  const dirents = await readdir(dir, { withFileTypes: true });
  const files = await Promise.all(dirents.map((dirent) => {
    const res = resolve(dir, dirent.name);
    return dirent.isDirectory() ? getFiles(res) : res;
  }));
  return Array.prototype.concat(...files);
}

Note that starting with node 11.15.0 you can use files.flat() instead of Array.prototype.concat(...files) to flatten the files array.

Node 11+

If you want to blow everybody's head up completely, you can use the following version using async iterators. In addition to being really cool, it also allows consumers to pull results one-at-a-time, making it better suited for really large directories.

const { resolve } = require('path');
const { readdir } = require('fs').promises;

async function* getFiles(dir) {
  const dirents = await readdir(dir, { withFileTypes: true });
  for (const dirent of dirents) {
    const res = resolve(dir, dirent.name);
    if (dirent.isDirectory()) {
      yield* getFiles(res);
    } else {
      yield res;
    }
  }
}

Usage has changed because the return type is now an async iterator instead of a promise

;(async () => {
  for await (const f of getFiles('.')) {
    console.log(f);
  }
})()

In case somebody is interested, I've written more about async iterators here: https://qwtel.com/posts/software/async-generators-in-the-wild/

Node 20+

As of Node 20, fs.readdir has a { recursive: true } option

const files = await fs.readdir(dir, { recursive: true });
16
  • 9
    The naming of subdir and subdirs is misleading, as those may be actually files (I suggest something like itemInDir or item_in_dir or even simply item instead.), but this solution feels cleaner than the accepted one and is much less code. I also don't find it much more complicated than the code in the accepted answer. +1 Oct 15, 2018 at 9:03
  • 4
    You could make this even more whizbang by using require(fs).promises and just drop util.promisify completely. Personally I alias fs to fs.promises. Dec 2, 2018 at 14:10
  • 5
    We can make this faster with one small change: passing the 2nd argument to readdir AKA the options object like so readdir(dir, {withFileTypes: true}) this will return all the items with their type information, SO we won't need to call stat at all to obtain the information that readdir now gives us back. This saves us from needing to make additional sys calls. Details here May 23, 2019 at 21:41
  • 2
    Is this known to not be able to get caught in infinite loops on symlinks? Jun 11, 2020 at 3:48
  • 2
    FWIW, the Node 10.10 version has fantastic performance, compared to a handful of other approaches I've tested.
    – ivanreese
    Apr 10, 2021 at 23:37
151

Just in case anyone finds it useful, I also put together a synchronous version.

var walk = function(dir) {
    var results = [];
    var list = fs.readdirSync(dir);
    list.forEach(function(file) {
        file = dir + '/' + file;
        var stat = fs.statSync(file);
        if (stat && stat.isDirectory()) { 
            /* Recurse into a subdirectory */
            results = results.concat(walk(file));
        } else { 
            /* Is a file */
            results.push(file);
        }
    });
    return results;
}

Tip: To use less resources when filtering. Filter within this function itself. E.g. Replace results.push(file); with below code. Adjust as required:

    file_type = file.split(".").pop();
    file_name = file.split(/(\\|\/)/g).pop();
    if (file_type == "json") results.push(file);
7
  • This is simple. But also a bit naive. Might cause a stackoverflow if a directory contains a link to a parent directory. Maybe use lstat instead? Or else add a recursiveness check to limit the recursivity level. Apr 18, 2014 at 22:21
  • 16
    Consider using file = require("path").join(dir,file)
    – mkamioner
    Jul 17, 2014 at 11:34
  • 24
    @mpen Semi-colons are redundant
    – Ally
    Feb 10, 2017 at 4:32
  • Instead of file = dir + '/' + file; file = path.join(dir, file); would be more elegant May 21, 2021 at 14:26
  • was stellar, thank you!
    – petrosmm
    Sep 29, 2022 at 2:30
92

A. Have a look at the file module. It has a function called walk:

file.walk(start, callback)

Navigates a file tree, calling callback for each directory, passing in (null, dirPath, dirs, files).

This may be for you! And yes, it is async. However, I think you would have to aggregate the full path's yourself, if you needed them.

B. An alternative, and even one of my favourites: use the unix find for that. Why do something again, that has already been programmed? Maybe not exactly what you need, but still worth checking out:

var execFile = require('child_process').execFile;
execFile('find', [ 'somepath/' ], function(err, stdout, stderr) {
  var file_list = stdout.split('\n');
  /* now you've got a list with full path file names */
});

Find has a nice build-in caching mechanism that makes subsequent searches very fast, as long as only few folder have changed.

3
  • Had a question about example B: For execFile() ( and exec() ) the stderr and stdout are Buffers.. so wouldn't you need to do stdout.toString.split("\n") since Buffers are not Strings?
    – Cheruvim
    Nov 18, 2014 at 22:20
  • 10
    nice, but not cross platform.
    – f0ster
    Nov 19, 2015 at 20:14
  • By the way: No, A is not Unix only! Only B is Unix only. However, Windows 10 now comes with a Linux subsystem. So even B would just work on Windows nowadays. Mar 21, 2017 at 8:55
56

I recommend using node-glob to accomplish that task.

var glob = require( 'glob' );  

glob( 'dirname/**/*.js', function( err, files ) {
  console.log( files );
});
1
44

Another nice npm package is glob.

npm install glob

It is very powerful and should cover all your recursing needs.

Edit:

I actually wasn't perfectly happy with glob, so I created readdirp.

I'm very confident that its API makes finding files and directories recursively and applying specific filters very easy.

Read through its documentation to get a better idea of what it does and install via:

npm install readdirp

4
  • Best module in my opinion. And is alike many other projects, like Grunt, Mocha, etc. and other 80'000+ other projects. Just saying. Mar 12, 2014 at 15:06
  • 4
    Could you please expand on your reasons to create readdrip @Thorsten Lorenz Mar 22, 2021 at 8:56
  • What's your problem with glob? Mar 30, 2023 at 10:37
  • Herein lies the problem of the npm ecosystem: far too many packages. Why reinvent the wheel? What's wrong with glob? May 25, 2023 at 17:22
36

Short, Modern and Efficient:

import {readdir} from 'node:fs/promises'
import {join} from 'node:path'

const walk = async (dirPath) => Promise.all(
  await readdir(dirPath, { withFileTypes: true }).then((entries) => entries.map((entry) => {
    const childPath = join(dirPath, entry.name)
    return entry.isDirectory() ? walk(childPath) : childPath
  })),
)

Special thank to Function for hinting: {withFileTypes: true}.


This automatically keeps tree-structure of the source directory (which you may need). For example if:

const allFiles = await walk('src')

then allFiles would be a TREE like this:

[
  [
    'src/client/api.js',
    'src/client/http-constants.js',
    'src/client/index.html',
    'src/client/index.js',
    [ 'src/client/res/favicon.ico' ],
    'src/client/storage.js'
  ],
  [ 'src/crypto/keygen.js' ],
  'src/discover.js',
  [
    'src/mutations/createNewMutation.js',
    'src/mutations/newAccount.js',
    'src/mutations/transferCredit.js',
    'src/mutations/updateApp.js'
  ],
  [
    'src/server/authentication.js',
    'src/server/handlers.js',
    'src/server/quick-response.js',
    'src/server/server.js',
    'src/server/static-resources.js'
  ],
  [ 'src/util/prompt.js', 'src/util/safeWriteFile.js' ],
  'src/util.js'
]

Flat it if you want:

allFiles.flat(Number.POSITIVE_INFINITY)
[
  'src/client/api.js',
  'src/client/http-constants.js',
  'src/client/index.html',
  'src/client/index.js',
  'src/client/res/favicon.ico',
  'src/client/storage.js',
  'src/crypto/keygen.js',
  'src/discover.js',
  'src/mutations/createNewMutation.js',
  'src/mutations/newAccount.js',
  'src/mutations/transferCredit.js',
  'src/mutations/updateApp.js',
  'src/server/authentication.js',
  'src/server/handlers.js',
  'src/server/quick-response.js',
  'src/server/server.js',
  'src/server/static-resources.js',
  'src/util/prompt.js',
  'src/util/safeWriteFile.js',
  'src/util.js'
]
3
  • could this be improved or simplified by using dirents ({ withFileTypes: true }) which already contain the info if they're directories or not, saving the lstat step?
    – Function
    Oct 16, 2022 at 15:18
  • @Function; Thank you very much. I edited and improved my answer. Oct 17, 2022 at 10:10
  • No need to use .flat(), just .push() at the end of the ternary: await deepReadDir(path) : list.push(path) Feb 25, 2023 at 19:32
17

If you want to use an npm package, wrench is pretty good.

var wrench = require("wrench");

var files = wrench.readdirSyncRecursive("directory");

wrench.readdirRecursive("directory", function (error, files) {
    // live your dreams
});

EDIT (2018):
Anyone reading through in recent time: The author deprecated this package in 2015:

wrench.js is deprecated, and hasn't been updated in quite some time. I heavily recommend using fs-extra to do any extra filesystem operations.

2
  • 1
    @Domenic, how do you denodify this? Callback is fired multiple times (recursively). So using Q.denodify(wrench.readdirRecursive) returns only the first result. Jul 18, 2014 at 23:52
  • 1
    @OnurYıldırım yeah, this is not a good fit for promises as-is. You would need to write something that returns multiple promises, or something that waits until all subdirs are enumerated before returning a promise. For the latter, see github.com/kriskowal/q-io#listdirectorytreepath
    – Domenic
    Jul 24, 2014 at 13:04
13

Async

const fs = require('fs')
const path = require('path')

const readdir = (p, done, a = [], i = 0) => fs.readdir(p, (e, d = []) =>
  d.map(f => readdir(a[a.push(path.join(p, f)) - 1], () =>
    ++i == d.length && done(a), a)).length || done(a))

readdir(__dirname, console.log)

Sync

const fs = require('fs')
const path = require('path')

const readdirSync = (p, a = []) => {
  if (fs.statSync(p).isDirectory())
    fs.readdirSync(p).map(f => readdirSync(a[a.push(path.join(p, f)) - 1], a))
  return a
}

console.log(readdirSync(__dirname))

Async readable

function readdir (currentPath, done, allFiles = [], i = 0) {
  fs.readdir(currentPath, function (e, directoryFiles = []) {
    if (!directoryFiles.length)
      return done(allFiles)
    directoryFiles.map(function (file) {
      var joinedPath = path.join(currentPath, file)
      allFiles.push(joinedPath)
      readdir(joinedPath, function () {
        i = i + 1
        if (i == directoryFiles.length)
          done(allFiles)}
      , allFiles)
    })
  })
}

readdir(__dirname, console.log)

Note: both versions will follow symlinks (same as the original fs.readdir)

12

With Recursion

var fs = require('fs')
var path = process.cwd()
var files = []

var getFiles = function(path, files){
    fs.readdirSync(path).forEach(function(file){
        var subpath = path + '/' + file;
        if(fs.lstatSync(subpath).isDirectory()){
            getFiles(subpath, files);
        } else {
            files.push(path + '/' + file);
        }
    });     
}

Calling

getFiles(path, files)
console.log(files) // will log all files in directory
1
  • 3
    I'd suggest not joining the path strings with / but using the path module: path.join(searchPath, file). That way, you will get correct paths independent of the OS. Dec 15, 2016 at 15:16
10

I loved the answer from chjj above and would not have been able to create my version of the parallel loop without that start.

var fs = require("fs");

var tree = function(dir, done) {
  var results = {
        "path": dir
        ,"children": []
      };
  fs.readdir(dir, function(err, list) {
    if (err) { return done(err); }
    var pending = list.length;
    if (!pending) { return done(null, results); }
    list.forEach(function(file) {
      fs.stat(dir + '/' + file, function(err, stat) {
        if (stat && stat.isDirectory()) {
          tree(dir + '/' + file, function(err, res) {
            results.children.push(res);
            if (!--pending){ done(null, results); }
          });
        } else {
          results.children.push({"path": dir + "/" + file});
          if (!--pending) { done(null, results); }
        }
      });
    });
  });
};

module.exports = tree;

I created a Gist as well. Comments welcome. I am still starting out in the NodeJS realm so that is one way I hope to learn more.

0
9

Vanilla ES6 + async/await + small & readable

I didn't find the answer I was looking for in this thread; there were a few similar elements spread across different answers, but I just wanted something simple and readable.

Just in case it helps anyone in the future (i.e. myself in a couple of months), this I what I ended up using:

const { readdir } = require('fs/promises');
const { join } = require('path');

const readdirRecursive = async dir => {
  const files = await readdir( dir, { withFileTypes: true } );

  const paths = files.map( async file => {
    const path = join( dir, file.name );

    if ( file.isDirectory() ) return await readdirRecursive( path );

    return path;
  } );

  return ( await Promise.all( paths ) ).flat( Infinity );
}

module.exports = {
  readdirRecursive,
}
2
  • Is recursiveReaddir supposed to be readdirRecursive?
    – bnieland
    May 24, 2022 at 13:47
  • @bnieland It is... Thanks for catching that! The answer has been updated :) Jun 23, 2022 at 17:40
8

Use node-dir to produce exactly the output you like

var dir = require('node-dir');

dir.files(__dirname, function(err, files) {
  if (err) throw err;
  console.log(files);
  //we have an array of files now, so now we can iterate that array
  files.forEach(function(path) {
    action(null, path);
  })
});
3
  • node-dir was working fine, but when I used it with webpack I have some weird issues. An  is inserted in the readFiles function as in "if (err)  { " causing an "uncaught SyntaxError: Unexpected token {" error. I am stumped by this issue and my immediate reaction is to replace node-dir with something similar
    – Parth
    Feb 11, 2017 at 6:51
  • 1
    @Parth this comment is not going to give you answers. Write a new full question on SO or create an issue at the GitHub repository. When you elaborate well on your question, you might even be able to solve your problem without even having to post it Feb 11, 2017 at 6:58
  • 1
    @Parth's comment may still be a useful warning for others who are considering your suggestion as the solution to their problem. They may not have been looking for an answer in this comments section :)
    – user993683
    Apr 12, 2017 at 11:26
8

Here is a simple synchronous recursive solution

const fs = require('fs')

const getFiles = path => {
    const files = []
    for (const file of fs.readdirSync(path)) {
        const fullPath = path + '/' + file
        if(fs.lstatSync(fullPath).isDirectory())
            getFiles(fullPath).forEach(x => files.push(file + '/' + x))
        else files.push(file)
    }
    return files
}

Usage:

const files = getFiles(process.cwd())

console.log(files)

You could write it asynchronously, but there is no need. Just make sure that the input directory exists and is accessible.

2
  • Was looking for a simple sync solution to load some config, and this met my needs. The base path in the forEach should be fullPath so that the file can be easily later read with fs.readFileSync(file) so x => files.push(fullPath + '/' + x)) Dec 2, 2021 at 22:56
  • Yep you can tweak it however you like, I think fs.readFileSync can understand relative paths though, so depends on where you're running it from but its likely the changes are not even required. Dec 7, 2021 at 12:39
8

Modern promise based read dir recursive version:

const fs = require('fs');
const path = require('path');

const readDirRecursive = async (filePath) => {
    const dir = await fs.promises.readdir(filePath);
    const files = await Promise.all(dir.map(async relativePath => {
        const absolutePath = path.join(filePath, relativePath);
        const stat = await fs.promises.lstat(absolutePath);

        return stat.isDirectory() ? readDirRecursive(absolutePath) : absolutePath;
    }));

    return files.flat();
}
7

qwtel's answer variant, in TypeScript

import { resolve } from 'path';
import { readdir } from 'fs/promises';

async function* getFiles(dir: string): AsyncGenerator<string> {
    const entries = await readdir(dir, { withFileTypes: true });
    for (const entry of entries) {
        const res = resolve(dir, entry.name);
        if (entry.isDirectory()) {
            yield* getFiles(res);
        } else {
            yield res;
        }
    }
}
6

Simple, Async Promise Based


const fs = require('fs/promises');
const getDirRecursive = async (dir) => {
    try {
        const items = await fs.readdir(dir);
        let files = [];
        for (const item of items) {
            if ((await fs.lstat(`${dir}/${item}`)).isDirectory()) files = [...files, ...(await getDirRecursive(`${dir}/${item}`))];
            else files.push({file: item, path: `${dir}/${item}`, parents: dir.split("/")});
        }
        return files;
    } catch (e) {
        return e
    }
};

Usage: await getDirRecursive("./public");

6

Shortest native solution which is available with v20.1 release:

import fs from 'node:fs'

const results = fs.promises.readdir('/tmp', { recursive: true })

recursive option is also supported by fs.readdir and fs.readdirSync functions.

5

Using async/await, this should work:

const FS = require('fs');
const readDir = promisify(FS.readdir);
const fileStat = promisify(FS.stat);

async function getFiles(dir) {
    let files = await readDir(dir);

    let result = files.map(file => {
        let path = Path.join(dir,file);
        return fileStat(path).then(stat => stat.isDirectory() ? getFiles(path) : path);
    });

    return flatten(await Promise.all(result));
}

function flatten(arr) {
    return Array.prototype.concat(...arr);
}

You can use bluebird.Promisify or this:

/**
 * Returns a function that will wrap the given `nodeFunction`. Instead of taking a callback, the returned function will return a promise whose fate is decided by the callback behavior of the given node function. The node function should conform to node.js convention of accepting a callback as last argument and calling that callback with error as the first argument and success value on the second argument.
 *
 * @param {Function} nodeFunction
 * @returns {Function}
 */
module.exports = function promisify(nodeFunction) {
    return function(...args) {
        return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
            nodeFunction.call(this, ...args, (err, data) => {
                if(err) {
                    reject(err);
                } else {
                    resolve(data);
                }
            })
        });
    };
};

Node 8+ has Promisify built-in

See my other answer for a generator approach that can give results even faster.

4

I've coded this recently, and thought it would make sense to share this here. The code makes use of the async library.

var fs = require('fs');
var async = require('async');

var scan = function(dir, suffix, callback) {
  fs.readdir(dir, function(err, files) {
    var returnFiles = [];
    async.each(files, function(file, next) {
      var filePath = dir + '/' + file;
      fs.stat(filePath, function(err, stat) {
        if (err) {
          return next(err);
        }
        if (stat.isDirectory()) {
          scan(filePath, suffix, function(err, results) {
            if (err) {
              return next(err);
            }
            returnFiles = returnFiles.concat(results);
            next();
          })
        }
        else if (stat.isFile()) {
          if (file.indexOf(suffix, file.length - suffix.length) !== -1) {
            returnFiles.push(filePath);
          }
          next();
        }
      });
    }, function(err) {
      callback(err, returnFiles);
    });
  });
};

You can use it like this:

scan('/some/dir', '.ext', function(err, files) {
  // Do something with files that ends in '.ext'.
  console.log(files);
});
1
  • 2
    This. This is so tidy and simple to use. I pumped it out into a module, required it and it works like a mcdream sandwich.
    – Jay
    Sep 22, 2013 at 11:25
4

A library called Filehound is another option. It will recursively search a given directory (working directory by default). It supports various filters, callbacks, promises and sync searches.

For example, search the current working directory for all files (using callbacks):

const Filehound = require('filehound');

Filehound.create()
.find((err, files) => {
    if (err) {
        return console.error(`error: ${err}`);
    }
    console.log(files); // array of files
});

Or promises and specifying a specific directory:

const Filehound = require('filehound');

Filehound.create()
.paths("/tmp")
.find()
.each(console.log);

Consult the docs for further use cases and examples of usage: https://github.com/nspragg/filehound

Disclaimer: I'm the author.

3

Check out the final-fs library. It provides a readdirRecursive function:

ffs.readdirRecursive(dirPath, true, 'my/initial/path')
    .then(function (files) {
        // in the `files` variable you've got all the files
    })
    .otherwise(function (err) {
        // something went wrong
    });
0
2

Standalone promise implementation

I am using the when.js promise library in this example.

var fs = require('fs')
, path = require('path')
, when = require('when')
, nodefn = require('when/node/function');

function walk (directory, includeDir) {
    var results = [];
    return when.map(nodefn.call(fs.readdir, directory), function(file) {
        file = path.join(directory, file);
        return nodefn.call(fs.stat, file).then(function(stat) {
            if (stat.isFile()) { return results.push(file); }
            if (includeDir) { results.push(file + path.sep); }
            return walk(file, includeDir).then(function(filesInDir) {
                results = results.concat(filesInDir);
            });
        });
    }).then(function() {
        return results;
    });
};

walk(__dirname).then(function(files) {
    console.log(files);
}).otherwise(function(error) {
    console.error(error.stack || error);
});

I've included an optional parameter includeDir which will include directories in the file listing if set to true.

2

The recursive-readdir module has this functionality.

2

klaw and klaw-sync are worth considering for this sort of thing. These were part of node-fs-extra.

2

For Node 10.3+, here is a for-await solution:

#!/usr/bin/env node

const FS = require('fs');
const Util = require('util');
const readDir = Util.promisify(FS.readdir);
const Path = require('path');

async function* readDirR(path) {
    const entries = await readDir(path,{withFileTypes:true});
    for(let entry of entries) {
        const fullPath = Path.join(path,entry.name);
        if(entry.isDirectory()) {
            yield* readDirR(fullPath);
        } else {
            yield fullPath;
        }
    }
}

async function main() {
    const start = process.hrtime.bigint();
    for await(const file of readDirR('/mnt/home/media/Unsorted')) {
        console.log(file);
    }
    console.log((process.hrtime.bigint()-start)/1000000n);
}

main().catch(err => {
    console.error(err);
});

The benefit of this solution is that you can start processing the results immediately; e.g. it takes 12 seconds to read all the files in my media directory, but if I do it this way I can get the first result within a few milliseconds.

1

Here's yet another implementation. None of the above solutions have any limiters, and so if your directory structure is large, they're all going to thrash and eventually run out of resources.

var async = require('async');
var fs = require('fs');
var resolve = require('path').resolve;

var scan = function(path, concurrency, callback) {
    var list = [];

    var walker = async.queue(function(path, callback) {
        fs.stat(path, function(err, stats) {
            if (err) {
                return callback(err);
            } else {
                if (stats.isDirectory()) {
                    fs.readdir(path, function(err, files) {
                        if (err) {
                            callback(err);
                        } else {
                            for (var i = 0; i < files.length; i++) {
                                walker.push(resolve(path, files[i]));
                            }
                            callback();
                        }
                    });
                } else {
                    list.push(path);
                    callback();
                }
            }
        });
    }, concurrency);

    walker.push(path);

    walker.drain = function() {
        callback(list);
    }
};

Using a concurrency of 50 works pretty well, and is almost as fast as simpler implementations for small directory structures.

1

I modified Trevor Senior's Promise based answer to work with Bluebird

var fs = require('fs'),
    path = require('path'),
    Promise = require('bluebird');

var readdirAsync = Promise.promisify(fs.readdir);
var statAsync = Promise.promisify(fs.stat);
function walkFiles (directory) {
    var results = [];
    return readdirAsync(directory).map(function(file) {
        file = path.join(directory, file);
        return statAsync(file).then(function(stat) {
            if (stat.isFile()) {
                return results.push(file);
            }
            return walkFiles(file).then(function(filesInDir) {
                results = results.concat(filesInDir);
            });
        });
    }).then(function() {
        return results;
    });
}

//use
walkDir(__dirname).then(function(files) {
    console.log(files);
}).catch(function(e) {
    console.error(e); {
});
1

For fun, here is a flow based version that works with highland.js streams library. It was co-authored by Victor Vu.

###
  directory >---m------> dirFilesStream >---------o----> out
                |                                 |
                |                                 |
                +--------< returnPipe <-----------+

  legend: (m)erge  (o)bserve

 + directory         has the initial file
 + dirListStream     does a directory listing
 + out               prints out the full path of the file
 + returnPipe        runs stat and filters on directories

###

_ = require('highland')
fs = require('fs')
fsPath = require('path')

directory = _(['someDirectory'])
mergePoint = _()
dirFilesStream = mergePoint.merge().flatMap((parentPath) ->
  _.wrapCallback(fs.readdir)(parentPath).sequence().map (path) ->
    fsPath.join parentPath, path
)
out = dirFilesStream
# Create the return pipe
returnPipe = dirFilesStream.observe().flatFilter((path) ->
  _.wrapCallback(fs.stat)(path).map (v) ->
    v.isDirectory()
)
# Connect up the merge point now that we have all of our streams.
mergePoint.write directory
mergePoint.write returnPipe
mergePoint.end()
# Release backpressure.  This will print files as they are discovered
out.each H.log
# Another way would be to queue them all up and then print them all out at once.
# out.toArray((files)-> console.log(files))
1

Using Promises (Q) to solve this in a Functional style:

var fs = require('fs'),
    fsPath = require('path'),
    Q = require('q');

var walk = function (dir) {
  return Q.ninvoke(fs, 'readdir', dir).then(function (files) {

    return Q.all(files.map(function (file) {

      file = fsPath.join(dir, file);
      return Q.ninvoke(fs, 'lstat', file).then(function (stat) {

        if (stat.isDirectory()) {
          return walk(file);
        } else {
          return [file];
        }
      });
    }));
  }).then(function (files) {
    return files.reduce(function (pre, cur) {
      return pre.concat(cur);
    });
  });
};

It returns a promise of an array, so you can use it as:

walk('/home/mypath').then(function (files) { console.log(files); });

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