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I want to generate a distance matrix 500X500 based on latitude and longitude of 500 locations, using Haversine formula.

Here is the sample data "coordinate.csv" for 10 locations:

Name,Latitude,Longitude
depot1,35.492807,139.6681689
depot2,33.6625572,130.4096027
depot3,35.6159881,139.7805445
customer1,35.622632,139.732631
customer2,35.857287,139.821461
customer3,35.955313,139.615387
customer4,35.16073,136.926239
customer5,36.118163,139.509548
customer6,35.937351,139.909783
customer7,35.949508,139.676462

After getting the distance matrix, I want to find the closest depot to each customer based on the distance matrix, and then save the output (Distance from each customer to the closet depot & Name of the closest depot) to Pandas DataFrame.

Expected outputs:

// Distance matrix
[ [..],[..],[..],[..],[..],[..],[..],[..],[..],[..] ]

// Closet depot to each customer (just an example)
Name,Latitude,Longitude,Distance_to_closest_depot,Closest_depot
depot1,35.492807,139.6681689,,
depot2,33.6625572,130.4096027,,
depot3,35.6159881,139.7805445,,
customer1,35.622632,139.732631,10,depot1
customer2,35.857287,139.821461,20,depot3
customer3,35.955313,139.615387,15,depot2
customer4,35.16073,136.926239,12,depot3
customer5,36.118163,139.509548,25,depot1
customer6,35.937351,139.909783,22,depot2
customer7,35.949508,139.676462,15,depot1
  • So you have explained what you want to do. Please note that Stack Overflow is not a blog for what people plan to do. If however you have a question, then please consult How to ask a good question, because currently there is no question. Don't forget to post the code you have, specifying where exactly you are stuck. – trincot Oct 9 at 15:23
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There are a couple of library functions that can help you with this:

  • cdist from scipy can be used to generate a distance matrix using whichever distance metric you like.
  • There is also a haversine function which you can pass to cdist.

After that it's just a case of finding the row-wise minimums from the distance matrix and adding them to your DataFrame. Full code below:

import pandas as pd
from scipy.spatial.distance import cdist
from haversine import haversine


df = pd.read_clipboard(sep=',')
df.set_index('Name', inplace=True)
customers = df[df.index.str.startswith('customer')]
depots = df[df.index.str.startswith('depot')]

dm = cdist(customers, depots, metric=haversine)
closest = dm.argmin(axis=1)
distances = dm.min(axis=1)

customers['Closest Depot'] = depots.index[closest]
customers['Distance'] = distances

Results:

            Latitude   Longitude Closest Depot    Distance
Name                                                      
customer1  35.622632  139.732631        depot3    4.393506
customer2  35.857287  139.821461        depot3   27.084212
customer3  35.955313  139.615387        depot3   40.565820
customer4  35.160730  136.926239        depot1  251.466152
customer5  36.118163  139.509548        depot3   60.945377
customer6  35.937351  139.909783        depot3   37.587862
customer7  35.949508  139.676462        depot3   38.255776

As per comment, I have created an alternative solution which instead uses a square distance matrix. The original solution is better in my opinion, as the question stated that we only want to find the closest depot for each customer, so calculating distances between customers and between depots isn't necessary. However, if you need the square distance matrix for some other purpose, here is how you would create it:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
from scipy.spatial.distance import squareform, pdist
from haversine import haversine


df = pd.read_clipboard(sep=',')
df.set_index('Name', inplace=True)

dm = pd.DataFrame(squareform(pdist(df, metric=haversine)), index=df.index, columns=df.index)
np.fill_diagonal(dm.values, np.inf)  # Makes it easier to find minimums

customers = df[df.index.str.startswith('customer')]
depots = df[df.index.str.startswith('depot')]
customers['Closest Depot'] = dm.loc[depots.index, customers.index].idxmin()
customers['Distance'] = dm.loc[depots.index, customers.index].min()

The final results are the same as before, except you now have a square distance matrix. You can put the 0s back on the diagonal after you have extracted the minimum values if you like:

np.fill_diagonal(dm.values, 0)
  • Thanks for your answer. Can I use pd.read_csv("coordinate.csv") instead of pd.read_clipboard? – belle Oct 10 at 1:58
  • Yes, pd.read_clipboard was just my way of reading your data into the DataFrame, but pd.read_csv("coordinate.csv") should work for you. – thesilkworm Oct 10 at 8:00
  • I want dm to be a square distance matrix format dm = [ [ ],[ ],...] with 0-value diagonal, because distance from A to A is 0. How can I do that and implement it with your other codes to make the same output? – belle Oct 10 at 11:30
  • @belle - I have edited my answer to give a second approach. – thesilkworm Oct 10 at 13:12
  • Sorry, because my distance matrix is an array of arrays (600x600) from google maps distance matrix api, so I want to know how to get the output by reading data from that array. Could you please help with this once again? Really appreciate your help. – belle Oct 10 at 14:28

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