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Following along http://blog.ptsecurity.com/2016/06/theory-and-practice-of-source-code.html#java--and-java8-grammars, I am trying to reduce left-recursion in my fairly complex grammar. From what I understand, the non-primitive form of recursion can lead to performance problems both in terms of memory and process time.

So I am trying to refactor these rules in my grammar to use only "primitive" recursion. Of course, that blog post is the only time I have seen the phrase "primitive" recursion in regards to Antlr. So I am just guessing at its meaning/intent. Seems to me it means a rule that refers to itself as a lhs for at most just a single rule branch. Correct?

At the moment I have an expression rule like:

expression
    : expression DOUBLE_PIPE expression         # ConcatenationExpression
    | expression PLUS expression                # AdditionExpression
    | expression MINUS expression               # SubtractionExpression
    | expression ASTERISK expression            # MultiplicationExpression
    | expression SLASH expression               # DivisionExpression
    | expression PERCENT expression             # ModuloExpression
    ...
    ;

The ... includes quite a few sub-rules that also refer back to expression. But these are the only ones with direct recursion.

If I understand correctly, refactoring these to be "primitive" recursion would look something like:

expression
    : binaryOpExpression                        # BinaryOpExpression
    ...
    ;

binaryOpExpression
    : expression DOUBLE_PIPE expression         # ConcatenationExpression
    | expression PLUS expression                # AdditionExpression
    | expression MINUS expression               # SubtractionExpression
    | expression ASTERISK expression            # MultiplicationExpression
    | expression SLASH expression               # DivisionExpression
    | expression PERCENT expression             # ModuloExpression
    ;

First, is that the correct refactoring?

Secondly, will that really help performance? At the end of the day it is still the same decisions, so I'm not really understanding how this helps performance (aside from maybe producing less ATNConfig objects).

Thanks

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I have not heard "primitive recursion" before in this context and the author probably only means to name a specific form of recursions in ANTLR4.

Fact is there are 3 relevant forms of recursions in ANTLR4:

  • Direct left recursion: recursion from the first rule reference in a rule (to the same rule). For example: a: ab | c;
  • Indirect left recursion: left recursion not directly from the same rule. For example: a: b | c; b: c | d; c: a | e; (not allowed in ANTLR4)
  • Right recursion: any other recursion in a rule. For example: a: ba | c;. The name "right recursion" is however only correct in cases of binary expression, but is used often to differentiate from left recursions in general.

Having said that it becomes clear that your rewrite is wrong, as it would create indirect left recursion, which ANLTR4 does not support. Direct left recursion is usually not a problem (from a memory or performance standpoint) because ANTLR4 converts them to non-recursive ATN rule graphs.

What can become a problem are right recursions, because they are implemented by code recursion (recursive function calls in the runtime), which may qickly exhaust the CPU stack. I have seen cases with big expressions which could not be parsed in a separate thread, because I couldn't set the thread stack size to a larger value (the main thread stack size usually can be adjusted via linker settings).

The only solution for the latter case, which I have found useful, is to lower the number of parser rules in the grammar that call each other. Of course it's a matter of structure, readability etc. to put certain expression elements in different rules (for example andExpression, orExpression, bitExpression etc.), but that may lead to pretty deep invocation stacks, which may exhaust the CPU stack and/or require a lot of time to process them.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for the reply Mike! To make sure I understand - you're saying that the rule, as-is, is "good"? The background is that I am trying to figure out why this Antlr v4 grammar seems to be much slower then our previous Antrlr v2 one. Yes, apples/oranges, but I was very surprised that the performance is slower. Profiling shows LOTS of ATNConfig objects created. Research suggested that this can be caused by too many decision points which might come from left-recursion. Any thoughts? Maybe that's another question? – Steve Ebersole Oct 11 '19 at 13:10
  • The ATNConfig instances are created during the prediction phase and then cached. This is what's commonly called the warm-up phase. It happens only once for each path taken through the ATN. So before you measure parsing performance do an initial run to let the runtime create the cache and after that do a second parse run with the same input, which you can measure. There can easily be a relation of 1:10 for normal parse runs vs. initial parse run. And yes, that grammar rule is perfectly fine as it is, since it is automatically converted (as mentioned already in my answer). – Mike Lischke Oct 12 '19 at 8:12
  • To clarify, the profiling I am doing is done on a warmed-up VM controlled through JMH. This grammar is for a query language, so that prediction happens for each parse. What is strange is that we can the result of the parsing. So throughout the entire JMH run there should literally be one parse. And yet the ATNConfig objects still appear as one of the biggest memory allocation pressures. Which is very concerning – Steve Ebersole Oct 14 '19 at 13:25
  • Sorry, I take that back... the creation of the ATNConfig references does happen up front mostly during warm-up. – Steve Ebersole Oct 14 '19 at 17:23

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