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A categorical variable V1 in a data frame D1 can have values represented by the letters from A to Z. I want to create a subset D2, which excludes some values, say, B, N and T. Basically, I want a command which is the opposite of %in%

D2 = subset(D1, V1 %in% c('B','N',T'))

14 Answers 14

373

You can use the ! operator to basically make any TRUE FALSE and every FALSE TRUE. so:

D2 = subset(D1, !(V1 %in% c('B','N','T')))

EDIT: You can also make an operator yourself:

'%!in%' <- function(x,y)!('%in%'(x,y))

c(1,3,11)%!in%1:10
[1] FALSE FALSE  TRUE
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  • 5
    The use of second option is illustrated in the help(match) page (where you would get to if you typed ?"%in%" ) where the new operator is called %w/o%. – IRTFM Apr 29 '11 at 12:50
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    also, see ?Negate e.g. "%ni%" <- Negate("%in%") – baptiste Jun 11 '11 at 6:09
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    Negate worked for me when used after defining the new operator, as suggested by baptiste, e.g. subset(df, variable %ni% c("A", "B")) , but not when used directly, e.g. subset(df, variable Negate("%in%") c("A", "B")) – PatrickT Oct 27 '15 at 9:20
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    @PatrickT that’s because only operators can be used as operators. and operators are either built-in or start and end with %. To create an operator, you need to assign a function with two operands to a name starting and ending with %. – flying sheep Mar 15 '19 at 16:41
72

How about:

'%ni%' <- Negate('%in%')
c(1,3,11) %ni% 1:10
# [1] FALSE FALSE  TRUE
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31

If you look at the code of %in%

 function (x, table) match(x, table, nomatch = 0L) > 0L

then you should be able to write your version of opposite. I use

`%not in%` <- function (x, table) is.na(match(x, table, nomatch=NA_integer_))

Another way is:

function (x, table) match(x, table, nomatch = 0L) == 0L
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23

Here is a version using filter in dplyr that applies the same technique as the accepted answer by negating the logical with !:

D2 <- D1 %>% dplyr::filter(!V1 %in% c('B','N','T'))
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14

Using negate from purrr also does the trick quickly and neatly:

`%not_in%` <- purrr::negate(`%in%`)

Then usage is, for example,

c("cat", "dog") %not_in% c("dog", "mouse")
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7

purrr::compose() is another quick way to define this for later use, as in:

`%!in%` <- compose(`!`, `%in%`)
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4

Another solution could be using setdiff

D1 = c("A",..., "Z") ; D0 = c("B","N","T")

D2 = setdiff(D1, D0)

D2 is your desired subset.

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  • Sometimes it can be useful but it doesn't produce the same results if the are repetitions. – skan Oct 12 at 15:38
2

Hmisc has %nin% function, which should do this.

https://www.rdocumentation.org/packages/Hmisc/versions/4.4-0/topics/%25nin%25

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2

Instead of creating your own function, it would be useful to just negate the behavior of

needle %in% haystack 

do this instead:

!(needle %in% haystack)

this works as well.

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1

This works fine for me:

`%nin%` <- Negate(`%in%`)
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0

The help for %in%, help("%in%"), includes, in the Examples section, this definition of not in,

"%w/o%" <- function(x, y) x[!x %in% y] #-- x without y

Lets try it:

c(2,3,4) %w/o% c(2,8,9)
[1] 3 4

Alternatively

"%w/o%" <- function(x, y) !x %in% y #--  x without y
c(2,3,4) %w/o% c(2,8,9)
# [1] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE
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0
require(TSDT)

c(1,3,11) %nin% 1:10
# [1] FALSE FALSE  TRUE

For more information, you can refer to: https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/TSDT/TSDT.pdf

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0
library(roperators)

1 %ni% 2:10

If you frequently need to use custom infix operators, it is easier to just have them in a package rather than declaring the same exact functions over and over in each script or project.

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  • While this may be a correct answer, it would be more useful with additional explanation of why it works. Consider editing it to include further details, and if you feel it's better than the accepted answer which was posted nearly a decade ago. – Jeremy Caney May 7 at 1:22
0

The package collapse has it built in: %!in%.

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