3

I try to perform a simple LIKE action on the database site, while having query building services based on generic types. I found out while debugging however, that performing EF.Functions.Like() with reflection does not work as expected:

The LINQ expression 'where __Functions_0.Like([c].GetType().GetProperty("FirstName").GetValue([c], null).ToString(), "%Test%")' could not be translated and will be evaluated locally..


The code that makes the difference

That works:

var query = _context.Set<Customer>().Where(c => EF.Functions.Like(c.FirstName, "%Test%"));

This throws the warning & tries to resolve in memory:

var query = _context.Set<Customer>().Where(c => EF.Functions.Like(c.GetType().GetProperty("FirstName").GetValue(c, null).ToString(), "%Test%"));

Does the Linq query builder or the EF.Functions not support reflections?

Sorry if the questions seem basic, it's my first attempt with .NET Core :)

  • It is possible, but you shouldn't do it. Entity Framework can't evaluate an expression containing reflection to SQL. So it will attempt load everything into memory and then executing the expression. What are you trying to achieve? Maybe we can provide an alternative – MindSwipe Oct 10 '19 at 10:50
  • Gave a more detailed answer in a comment for @Serdar. Basically - a generic query params search functionality by extending an IQueryable, where the queryParam.Key a model class property is, and queryParam.Value the pattern used in LIKE clause. – Jan Pedryc Oct 10 '19 at 11:36
5

In EF the lambdas are ExpressionTrees and the expressions are translated to T-SQL so that the query can be executed in the database.

You can create an extension method like so:

public static IQueryable<T> Search<T>(this IQueryable<T> source, string propertyName, string searchTerm)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(propertyName) || string.IsNullOrEmpty(searchTerm))
    {
        return source;
    }

    var property = typeof(T).GetProperty(propertyName);

    if (property is null)
    {
        return source;
    }

    searchTerm = "%" + searchTerm + "%";
    var itemParameter = Parameter(typeof(T), "item");

    var functions = Property(null, typeof(EF).GetProperty(nameof(EF.Functions)));
    var like = typeof(DbFunctionsExtensions).GetMethod(nameof(DbFunctionsExtensions.Like), new Type[] { functions.Type, typeof(string), typeof(string) });

    Expression expressionProperty = Property(itemParameter, property.Name);

    if (property.PropertyType != typeof(string))
    {
        expressionProperty = Call(expressionProperty, typeof(object).GetMethod(nameof(object.ToString), new Type[0]));
    }

    var selector = Call(
               null,
               like,
               functions,
               expressionProperty,
               Constant(searchTerm));

    return source.Where(Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(selector, itemParameter));
}

And use it like so:

var query = _context.Set<Customer>().Search("FirstName", "Test").ToList();
var query2 = _context.Set<Customer>().Search("Age", "2").ToList();

For reference this was the Customer I used:

public class Customer
{
    [Key]
    public Guid Id { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks a lot! That was something I was wishing for - had already an extension method for pagination. Have yet to read up on expression trees to fully understand your code. Are you using some classes from an extension package? Parameter, Property, Call, Constant and Lambda give me some issues. – Jan Pedryc Oct 11 '19 at 11:44
  • 1
    I am just using a static using, like so: using static System.Linq.Expressions.Expression; – CarlosMorgado Oct 12 '19 at 11:24
1

Keep in mind that every ExpresionTree that you put in Where clause has to be translated into SQL query.

Because of that, ExpressionTrees that you can write are quite limited, you have to stick to some rules, thats why reflection is not supported.

Image that instead of :

var query = _context.Set<Customer>().Where(c => EF.Functions.Like(c.GetType().GetProperty("FirstName").GetValue(c, null).ToString(), "%Test%"));

You write something like:

var query = _context.Set<Customer>().Where(c => EF.Functions.Like(SomeMethodThatReturnsString(c), "%Test%"));

It would mean that EF is able to translate any c# code to SQL query - it's obviously not true :)

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Awesome comment, thank you! Did not think that through. Have to follow up what is actually translatable. Pozdrawiam! ;) – Jan Pedryc Oct 10 '19 at 11:04
1

Simple answer, no.

EntityFramework is trying to covert your where clause in to a SQL Query. There is no native support for reflection in this conversation.

You have 2 options here. You can construct your text outside of your query or directly use property itself. Is there any specific reason for not using something like following?

var query = _context.Set<Customer>().Where(c => EF.Functions.Like(c.FirstName, "%Test%"));
| improve this answer | |
  • I try to make a search feature class for provided query params (dict - k: Properties, v: searchString) that is injected where there search feature is required. Eventually, I have a function public IQueryable<T> ApplySearch<T>(IQueryable<T> efQuery) where T : class that, while looping through the query params, extends the query with additional where clauses: efQuery = efQuery.Where(t => EF.Functions.Like(t.GetType().GetProperty(queryParam.Key).GetValue(t).ToString(), "%" + queryParam.Value + "%"));. That was the main goal. – Jan Pedryc Oct 10 '19 at 10:46
  • Using reflaction is almost opposite of EntityFramework. Normally you need to use ORM Tools when you have strong types queries. In your case, you are trying to build something dynamically. You can still build it with EntityFramework, but it may requires some nasty code. Instead of that, you can consider executing constructed queries by your reflection logic with EF maybe? – Serdar Oct 10 '19 at 10:57
1

I chucked together a version of the accepted answer for those using NpgSQL as their EF Core provider as you will need to use the ILike function instead if you want case-insensitivity, also added a second version which combines a bunch of properties into a single Where() clause:

public static IQueryable<T> WhereLike<T>(this IQueryable<T> source, string propertyName, string searchTerm)
    {
        // Check property name
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(propertyName))
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(propertyName));
        }

        // Check the search term
        if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(searchTerm))
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(searchTerm));
        }

        // Check the property exists
        var property = typeof(T).GetProperty(propertyName);
        if (property == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException($"The property {typeof(T)}.{propertyName} was not found.", nameof(propertyName));
        }

        // Check the property type
        if(property.PropertyType != typeof(string))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException($"The specified property must be of type {typeof(string)}.", nameof(propertyName));
        }

        // Get expression constants
        var searchPattern = "%" + searchTerm + "%";
        var itemParameter = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "item");
        var functions = Expression.Property(null, typeof(EF).GetProperty(nameof(EF.Functions)));
        var likeFunction = typeof(NpgsqlDbFunctionsExtensions).GetMethod(nameof(NpgsqlDbFunctionsExtensions.ILike), new Type[] { functions.Type, typeof(string), typeof(string) });

        // Build the property expression and return it
        Expression selectorExpression = Expression.Property(itemParameter, property.Name);
        selectorExpression = Expression.Call(null, likeFunction, functions, selectorExpression, Expression.Constant(searchPattern));
        return source.Where(Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(selectorExpression, itemParameter));
    }

    public static IQueryable<T> WhereLike<T>(this IQueryable<T> source, IEnumerable<string> propertyNames, string searchTerm)
    {
        // Check property name
        if (!(propertyNames?.Any() ?? false))
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(propertyNames));
        }

        // Check the search term
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(searchTerm))
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(searchTerm));
        }

        // Check the property exists
        var properties = propertyNames.Select(p => typeof(T).GetProperty(p)).AsEnumerable();
        if (properties.Any(p => p == null))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException($"One or more specified properties was not found on type {typeof(T)}: {string.Join(",", properties.Where(p => p == null).Select((p, i) => propertyNames.ElementAt(i)))}.", nameof(propertyNames));
        }

        // Check the property type
        if (properties.Any(p => p.PropertyType != typeof(string)))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException($"The specified properties must be of type {typeof(string)}: {string.Join(",", properties.Where(p => p.PropertyType != typeof(string)).Select(p => p.Name))}.", nameof(propertyNames));
        }

        // Get the expression constants
        var searchPattern = "%" + searchTerm + "%";
        var itemParameter = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "item");
        var functions = Expression.Property(null, typeof(EF).GetProperty(nameof(EF.Functions)));
        var likeFunction = typeof(NpgsqlDbFunctionsExtensions).GetMethod(nameof(NpgsqlDbFunctionsExtensions.ILike), new Type[] { functions.Type, typeof(string), typeof(string) });

        // Build the expression and return it
        Expression selectorExpression = null;
        foreach (var property in properties)
        {
            var previousSelectorExpression = selectorExpression;
            selectorExpression = Expression.Property(itemParameter, property.Name);
            selectorExpression = Expression.Call(null, likeFunction, functions, selectorExpression, Expression.Constant(searchPattern));
            if(previousSelectorExpression != null)
            {
                selectorExpression = Expression.Or(previousSelectorExpression, selectorExpression);
            }
        }
        return source.Where(Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(selectorExpression, itemParameter));
    }
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