35

I need a js sum function to work like this:

sum(1)(2) = 3
sum(1)(2)(3) = 6
sum(1)(2)(3)(4) = 10 
etc.

I heard it can't be done. But heard that if adding + in front of sum can be done. Like +sum(1)(2)(3)(4).
Any ideas of how to do this?

3
  • See also here for some more explanation – Bergi May 29 '16 at 22:05
  • 4
    Variadic functions and currying are incompatible. Just don't do it! The accepted answer is a dirty hack. Use semi-variadic functions instead, where the variadic arguments are passed within an array. – user6445533 Jun 24 '16 at 21:42
  • 1
    The functions in JavaScript are variadic by default, so hacking the language in a such way is harmful, because it may confuse newbies that getting multi-arity fns like this is the way, while it's definitely not. There are more smart ways to learn how can we use valueOf method. – Bogdan Slovyagin Apr 18 '17 at 12:35

16 Answers 16

71

Not sure if I understood what you want, but

function sum(n) {
  var v = function(x) {
    return sum(n + x);
  };

  v.valueOf = v.toString = function() {
    return n;
  };

  return v;
}

console.log(+sum(1)(2)(3)(4));

JsFiddle

8
  • 1
    what does the + before the function call means? – Dan Apr 29 '11 at 14:00
  • 9
    The + casts the result of sum() to number. In that case JavaScript calls the .valueOf method of an object. Since I'm returning anonymous function, this helps to convert it to primitive type. As you can see, I overwrote the native .valueOf with my own. – Rafael Apr 29 '11 at 14:02
  • 1
    Btw Firefox dont need + to perform casting :-). you can call it without and it will work. – Yaroslav Yakovlev Apr 29 '11 at 14:04
  • 6
    @Yaroslav: It will work if the result is converted to string (eg. when using alert()). When using native console.log, you will see function () { return n + x; } in the console. – Rafael Apr 29 '11 at 14:06
  • 1
    @maverick no, valueOf is called by JavaScript internals, e.g. when running the unary + operator. As per ES5 specs, the + runs the abstract ToNumber, which in turn calls abstract ToPrimitive which calls internal method ` [[DefaultValue]]` which finally calls valueOf. You can follow the call chain starting from here – Rafael May 15 '18 at 10:05
24

This is an example of using empty brackets in the last call as a close key (from my last interview):

sum(1)(4)(66)(35)(3)()

function sum(numberOne) {
  var count = numberOne;
  return function by(numberTwo) {
    if (numberTwo === undefined) {
      return count;
    } else {
      count += numberTwo;
      return by;
    }
  }
}
console.log(sum(1)(4)(66)(35)(3)());

1
  • Thank you so much. I was banging my head for this answer. I would be happy if you can explain the logic behind this and how it actually works? – Tarun Nagpal May 19 '18 at 11:50
8

I'm posting this revision as its own post since I apparently don't have enough reputation yet to just leave it as a comment. This is a revision of @Rafael 's excellent solution.

function sum (n) {
    var v = x => sum (n + x);
    v.valueOf = () => n; 
    return v;
}

console.log(+sum(1)(2)(3)(4)); //10

I didn't see a reason to keep the v.toString bit, as it didn't seem necessary. If I erred in doing so, please let me know in the comments why v.toString is required (it passed my tests fine without it). Converted the rest of the anonymous functions to arrow functions for ease of reading.

2
  • toString means that console.log("The result is " + sum(1) + "!") works properly – Eric May 30 '16 at 10:33
  • 1
    console.log("The result is " + sum(1) + "!") returns the string ​The result is 1! even when the toString is omitted from the v.valueOf statement in the sum function, as I have done above. Still not clear on what adding toString would accomplish that isn't already happening. – Brad May 30 '16 at 21:09
6

Here is a solution that uses ES6 and toString, similar to @Vemba

function add(a) {
  let curry = (b) => {
    a += b
    return curry
  }
  curry.toString = () => a
  return curry
}

console.log(add(1))
console.log(add(1)(2))
console.log(add(1)(2)(3))
console.log(add(1)(2)(3)(4))

4

Here's a solution with a generic variadic curry function in ES6 Javascript, with the caveat that a final () is needed to invoke the arguments:

const curry = (f) =>
   (...args) => args.length? curry(f.bind(0, ...args)): f();
const sum = (...values) => values.reduce((total, current) => total + current, 0)
curry(sum)(2)(2)(1)() == 5 // true

Here's another one that doesn't need (), using valueOf as in @rafael's answer. I feel like using valueOf in this way (or perhaps at all) is very confusing to people reading your code, but each to their own.

The toString in that answer is unnecessary. Internally, when javascript performs a type coersion it always calls valueOf() before calling toString().


// invokes a function if it is used as a value
const autoInvoke = (f) => Object.assign(f, { valueOf: f } );

const curry = autoInvoke((f) =>
   (...args) => args.length? autoInvoke(curry(f.bind(0, ...args))): f());

const sum = (...values) => values.reduce((total, current) => total + current, 0)
curry(sum)(2)(2)(1) + 0 == 5 // true
3

Another slightly shorter approach:

 const sum = a => b => b? sum(a + b) : a;

Usable as:

console.log(
  sum(1)(2)(),
  sum(3)(4)(5)()
);
3

New ES6 way and is concise.

You have to pass empty () at the end when you want to terminate the call and get the final value.

const sum= x => y => (y !== undefined) ? sum(x + y) : x;

call it like this -

sum(10)(30)(45)();
2

Try this

function sum (...args) {
  return Object.assign(
    sum.bind(null, ...args),
    { valueOf: () => args.reduce((a, c) => a + c, 0) }
  )
}

console.log(+sum(1)(2)(3,2,1)(16))

Here you can see a medium post about carried functions with unlimited arguments

https://medium.com/@seenarowhani95/infinite-currying-in-javascript-38400827e581

1
function add(a) {
    let curry = (b) => {
        a += b
        return curry;
    }
    curry[Symbol.toPrimitive] = (hint) => {
        return a;
    }
    return curry
}

console.log(+add(1)(2)(3)(4)(5));        // 15
console.log(+add(6)(6)(6));              // 18
console.log(+add(7)(0));                 // 7
console.log(+add(0));                    // 0
0

You can make use of the below function

function add(num){
   add.sum || (add.sum = 0) // make sure add.sum exists if not assign it to 0
   add.sum += num; // increment it
   return add.toString = add.valueOf = function(){ 
      var rtn = add.sum; // we save the value
      return add.sum = 0, rtn // return it before we reset add.sum to 0
   }, add; // return the function
}

Since functions are objects, we can add properties to it, which we are resetting when it's been accessed.

3
  • you didnt explain what you have written.. -1 – Naeem Shaikh Feb 12 '15 at 11:05
  • @NaeemShaikh ok. If that is it, then it's fine :) – Amit Joki Feb 12 '15 at 11:14
  • 2
    This is bad, because it leaves global state. x = add(1)(2); y = add(4); console.log(y) gives 7, not 4 – Eric May 30 '16 at 0:37
0

Here is another functional way using an iterative process

const sum = (num, acc = 0) => {
    if (!num) return acc;
    return x => sum(x, acc + num)
}

sum(1)(2)(3)()

and one-line

const sum = (num, acc = 0) => !num ? acc : x => sum(x, acc + num)

sum(1)(2)(3)()
0

Might be an old question but a little extended answer

function sum() {

    var args = [];
    args.push(...arguments);

    function sumOfAllArguments() {
        return args.reduce((prev,items)=>prev + items, 0)
    }

    function v() {
        arguments && args.push(...arguments);
        return arguments.length === 0 ? sumOfAllArguments() : v;
    }

    v.valueOf = v.toString = sumOfAllArguments;

    return v;

}
        
    

        console.log(sum(2)(2)(2)()) // 6
        console.log(sum(2)(2)(2).toString()) // 6
        console.log(sum(2)(2)(2).valueOf()) // 6
        console.log(+sum(2)(2)(2)) //6
        console.log(sum(2)(2)(2)) // f 6

        console.log(sum(2,2,2)(2,2)(2)) // f 12
        console.log(sum(2)(2,2)(2)()) //  8

0

Here's a more generic solution that would work for non-unary params as well:

const sum = function (...args) {
  let total = args.reduce((acc, arg) => acc+arg, 0)
  function add (...args2) {
    if (args2.length) {
      total = args2.reduce((acc, arg) => acc+arg, total)
      return add
    }
    return total
  }

  return add
}

document.write( sum(1)(2)() , '<br/>') // with unary params
document.write( sum(1,2)() , '<br/>') // with binary params
document.write( sum(1)(2)(3)() , '<br/>') // with unary params
document.write( sum(1)(2,3)() , '<br/>') // with binary params
document.write( sum(1)(2)(3)(4)() , '<br/>') // with unary params
document.write( sum(1)(2,3,4)() , '<br/>') // with ternary params

-1

To make sum(1) callable as sum(1)(2), it must return a function.

The function can be either called or converted to a number with valueOf.

function sum(a) {

   var sum = a;
   function f(b) {
       sum += b;
       return f;
    }
   f.toString = function() { return sum }
   return f
}
-1
   function sum(a){
    let res = 0;
    function getarrSum(arr){
            return arr.reduce( (e, sum=0) =>  { sum += e ; return sum ;} )
     }

    function calculateSumPerArgument(arguments){
            let res = 0;
            if(arguments.length >0){

            for ( let i = 0 ; i < arguments.length ; i++){
                if(Array.isArray(arguments[i])){
                    res += getarrSum( arguments[i]);
                }
                else{
                  res += arguments[i];
                }
             }
          }
            return res;
     }
    res += calculateSumPerArgument(arguments);



    return function f(b){
        if(b == undefined){
            return res;
        }
        else{
            res += calculateSumPerArgument(arguments);
            return f;
        }
    }

}
1
  • I have written generic function .. it will run for any combination of number //and array. For calling Ex. sum(1)(2)() or sum(1)(2)(12,[3,4])() or sum(1,2,3,[12,4])(4,5,[1,2,3])(23)() – Manoj Patial Mar 30 '18 at 10:48
-1
let add = (a) => {
  let sum = a;
  funct = function(b) {
    sum += b;
    return funct;
  };

  Object.defineProperty(funct, 'valueOf', {
    value: function() {
      return sum;
    }
  });
  return funct;
};


console.log(+add(1)(2)(3))
1
  • 2
    Add some explanation of what it does. – Nagaraju May 22 '18 at 6:08

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