2

A need a global snackbar like notification handler what can be triggered from anywhere not just a react component.

My idea was to make a component that listening to a CustomEvent and just simply show the snackbar when event is triggered. I made a simple event dispatcher class that can import in every part of the project. It works well and very easy to use.

Part of the global react component

componentDidMount() {
  document.addEventListener("onGobalMessage", this.onSnackMessage);
}

componentWillUnmount() {
  document.removeEventListener("onGobalMessage", this.onSnackMessage);
}

onSnackMessage = evt => {
  const { detail } = evt;
  this.setState({ open: true, ...detail });
};

Dispatcher object

export const globalMessage = {
  success: message => {
    let event = new CustomEvent("onGobalMessage", {
      detail: {
        message,
        variant: "success"
      }
    });
    document.dispatchEvent(event);
  },
  error: message => {
    let event = new CustomEvent("onGobalMessage", {
      detail: {
        message,
        variant: "error"
      }
    });
    document.dispatchEvent(event);
  }
};

My question is: Is it from evil to use this way in a react project? :)

2
  • You state "A need a global snackbar like notification handler what can be triggered from anywhere not just a react component." Why do you need to trigger it from anywhere not just React since you're using React?
    – henrik123
    Commented Oct 11, 2019 at 7:46
  • Looks good. Just 1 thing should be considered that we should have control over a notification and we should be able to close a specific notification in some crucial circumstances even before timeout occurs
    – Vishal
    Commented Oct 11, 2019 at 8:15

1 Answer 1

5

Is it from evil to use this way in a react project?

No. Using events is a pattern - "The Observer Pattern". It is not an Antipattern, but as riotjs states in in v4, it is:

"[…] an opinionated decision that might not work for all users."

Riot is inspired by react and in the now separate observable-package it is explained:

By using the observable the extensions can listen to these events and react to them. They extend the core so that the core is not aware of these modules. This is called "loose coupling".

While the react-developers recommend components react to state changes (reactive), they leave the final decisions to the users "you can use as little or as much React as you need"

In short: If your mental models work well with events at document, do it! React enables you to do so.


P.S. Additions from my personal experience:

  • Using the react way with only internal state, passing props down / callbacks up and connect components to redux also has led to some chaotic codebases. "functional" and "reactive" are no recipes for clean code.
  • When using events, a pitfall is to have non-unique event-names. You can work around that by prefixing them with the js-module-name, or by importing string-constants from one single file like import { ON_GLOBAL_MESSAGE } from src/events.js
  • You may want to use hooks for un-/subscribing
import React, { useEffect } from 'react';

export const MyComponent = () => {
  const onSnackMessage = (event) => {…}

  useEffect(() => {
    document.addEventListener("onGobalMessage", onSnackMessage);
    return () => {
      // Clean up the subscription
      document.removeEventListener("onGobalMessage", onSnackMessage);
    };
  });

…
}

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