-2

I have a python script that I got from this question that will pull from the USGS Elevation Point Query Service. However, It keeps timing out and kicks me out after a seemingly random amount of time and before my query finishes. I need another method to pull elevation data given lat lon coordinates.

Here is my current query:

# ========= pull elev from usgs server ======

# USGS POINT QUERY SERVICE ==================

url = r'https://nationalmap.gov/epqs/pqs.php?'
# ===========================================

# coordinates with known elevation 
lat = [48.633, 48.733, 45.1947, 45.1962]
lon = [-93.9667, -94.6167, -93.3257, -93.2755]

# create df
df = pd.DataFrame({
    'lat': lat,
    'lon': lon
})

def elevation_function(df, lat_column, long_column):
    elevations = []
    counter = 0
    start = time.time()
    for lat, lon in zip(df[lat_column], df[long_column]):

        # define rest query params
        params = {
            'output': 'json',
            'x': lon,
            'y': lat,
            'units': 'Meters'
        }

        # format query string and return query value
        result = requests.get((url + urllib.parse.urlencode(params)))
        elevations.append(result.json()['USGS_Elevation_Point_Query_Service']['Elevation_Query']['Elevation'])
        counter += 1
        print('Proportion of job complete: {}'.format(round(counter/df.shape[0],3)))
        end = time.time()
        print(str(round(end - start)) + " seconds into job\n")
    df['elev'] = elevations
    return elevations

start = time.time()
count = 0
for i in range(100):
    count += 1
    elevations = elevation_function(df, lat_column='lat', long_column='lon')
end = time.time()

print(str(round(end - start)))
  • This question was already closed, and then voted to reopen, so don't close it again. /eyeroll! – Trenton McKinney Oct 12 '19 at 22:25
3

Streamline the function and add error handling:

  • elevation_function needs to be written to work with pandas.DataFrame.apply
    • Using apply, with axis=1, automatically iterates through each row of coordinates

New Functions:

  • make_remote_request will continue to make the request until it gets response.
  • Change the exception to fit the exception returned by the server (e.g. except (OSError, urllib3.exceptions.ProtocolError) as error)
  • Optionally, import time and add time.sleep(5) before continue in the exception, to play nice with the remote server.
def make_remote_request(url: str, params: dict) -> json:
    """
    Makes the remote request
    Continues making attempts until it succeeds
    """

    count = 1
    while True:
        try:
            response = requests.get((url + urllib.parse.urlencode(params)))
        except (OSError, urllib3.exceptions.ProtocolError) as error:
            print('\n')
            print('*' * 20, 'Error Occured', '*' * 20)
            print(f'Number of tries: {count}')
            print(f'URL: {url}')
            print(error)
            print('\n')
            count += 1
            continue
        break

    return response


def eleveation_function(x):
    url = 'https://nationalmap.gov/epqs/pqs.php?'
    params = {'x': x[1],
              'y': x[0],
              'units': 'Meters',
              'output': 'json'}
    result = make_remote_request(url, params)
    return result.json()['USGS_Elevation_Point_Query_Service']['Elevation_Query']['Elevation']

Implement the function

import requests
import urllib
import urllib3
import pandas as pd

# coordinates with known elevation 
lat = [48.633, 48.733, 45.1947, 45.1962]
lon = [-93.9667, -94.6167, -93.3257, -93.2755]

# create df
df = pd.DataFrame({'lat': lat, 'lon': lon})

     lat      lon
 48.6330 -93.9667
 48.7330 -94.6167
 45.1947 -93.3257
 45.1962 -93.2755

# apply the function
df['elevations'] = df.apply(eleveation_function, axis=1)

     lat      lon  elevations
 48.6330 -93.9667      341.14
 48.7330 -94.6167      328.80
 45.1947 -93.3257      262.68
 45.1962 -93.2755      272.64
  • Hey @Trenton McKinney Thanks for the help! What does the the make_remote_requestion() syntax -> json: do? That should be commented out correct? – Bstampe Oct 14 '19 at 14:40
  • 1
    No, those are type annotations. That means the function returns a JSON. – Trenton McKinney Oct 14 '19 at 15:30
  • The error handling is working fantastic! For the purpose of seeing progress I added from tqdm import tqdm tqdm.pandas(mininterval=5.,maxinterval=20.) and instead of .apply() I used .progress_apply() – Bstampe Oct 14 '19 at 15:52
  • I was not able to access that URL, as it has been moved. Instead, I found this one which worked, however the JSON returned is a little different: opentopodata example – Michael Behrens Jul 9 '20 at 2:30
  • @MichaelBehrens You must have done something incorrectly. I just ran it and it worked fine. https://nationalmap.gov/epqs/pqs.php? is not the full url. See response = requests.get((url + urllib.parse.urlencode(params))) – Trenton McKinney Jul 9 '20 at 2:48
0

Can also pass in params with the following:

PARAMS = {'x':x[1], 'y':x[0], 'units':'Feet', 'output':'json'} 
r = requests.get(url = URL, params = PARAMS) 

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.