17

So basically I wrote myself this function so as to be able to count the number of occurances of a Substring in a String:

String.prototype.numberOf = function(needle) {
  var num = 0,
      lastIndex = 0;
  if(typeof needle === "string" || needle instanceof String) {
    while((lastIndex = this.indexOf(needle, lastIndex) + 1) > 0)
      {num++;} return num;
  } else if(needle instanceof RegExp) {
    // needle.global = true;
    return this.match(needle).length;
  } return 0;
};

The method itself performs rather well and both the RegExp and String based searches are quite comparable as to the execution time (both ~2ms on the entire vast Ray Bradbury's "451 Fahrenheit" searching for all the "the"s).

What sort of bothers me, though, is the impossibility of changing the flag of the supplied RegExp instance. There is no point in calling String.prototype.match in this function without the global flag of the supplied Regular Expression set to true, as it would only note the first occurance then. You could certainly set the flag manually on each RegExp passed to the function, I'd however prefer being able to clone and then manipulate the supplied Regular Expression's flags.

Astonishingly enough, I'm not permitted to do so as the RegExp.prototype.global flag (more precisely all flags) appear to be read-only. Thence the commented-out line 8.

So my question is: Is there a nice way of changing the flags of a RegExp object?

I don't really wanna do stuff like this:

if(!expression.global)
  expression = eval(expression.toString() + "g");

Some implementations might not event support the RegExp.prototype.toString and simply inherit it from the Object.prototype, or it could be a different formatting entirely. And it just seems as a bad coding practice to begin with.

  • I see. Well, I edited the post, so you can remove the downrate. :-) – Witiko Apr 29 '11 at 19:05
  • Done and done. Sorry 'bout that! – ridgerunner Apr 29 '11 at 19:16
15

First, your current code does not work correctly when needle is a regex which does not match. i.e. The following line:

return this.match(needle).length;

The match method returns null when there is no match. A JavaScript error is then generated when the length property of null is (unsuccessfully) accessed. This is easily fixed like so:

var m = this.match(needle);
return m ? m.length : 0;

Now to the problem at hand. You are correct when you say that global, ignoreCase and multiline are read only properties. The only option is to create a new RegExp. This is easily done since the regex source string is stored in the re.source property. Here is a tested modified version of your function which corrects the problem above and creates a new RegExp object when needle does not already have its global flag set:

String.prototype.numberOf = function(needle) {
    var num = 0,
    lastIndex = 0;
    if (typeof needle === "string" || needle instanceof String) {
        while((lastIndex = this.indexOf(needle, lastIndex) + 1) > 0)
            {num++;} return num;
    } else if(needle instanceof RegExp) {
        if (!needle.global) {
            // If global flag not set, create new one.
            var flags = "g";
            if (needle.ignoreCase) flags += "i";
            if (needle.multiline) flags += "m";
            needle = RegExp(needle.source, flags);
        }
        var m = this.match(needle);
        return m ? m.length : 0;
    }
    return 0;
};
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for pointing out the inconsistency. I like the solution, it is maybe safer not to extend the RegExp prototype with a flags function (as suggested above). – Witiko Apr 29 '11 at 18:55
  • Better yet, use myRegex.test(str) if that's all you care about. It's both shorter and faster. – Phrogz Apr 29 '11 at 20:18
  • Not quite, I'm trying to count all the occurances. :-) – Witiko Apr 30 '11 at 9:57
10
var globalRegex = new RegExp(needle.source, "g");

Live Demo EDIT: The m was only for the sake of demonstrating that you can set multiple modifiers

var regex = /find/;
var other = new RegExp(regex.source, "gm");
alert(other.global);
alert(other.multiline);
| improve this answer | |
4

There isn't much you can do but I highly recommend you avoid using eval. You can extend the RegExp prototype to help you out.

RegExp.prototype.flags = function () {
    return (this.ignoreCase ? "i" : "")
        + (this.multiline ? "m" : "")
        + (this.global ? "g" : "");
};

var reg1 = /AAA/i;
var reg2 = new RegExp(reg1.source, reg1.flags() + 'g');
| improve this answer | |
  • I figured out the .source part just a few moments ago. I, however, completely forgot about the fact that the flags aren't a part of the source. :) I think I will incorporate the idea. Thanks ;) – Witiko Apr 29 '11 at 18:21
3
r = new Regexp(r.source, r.flags + (r.global ? "" : "g"));
| improve this answer | |
  • Use a note, the () around r.global ? "" : "g" is necessary because the conditional operator has a lower precedence than addition. That tripped me up so be careful. – AlienKevin Aug 25 '19 at 11:11

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