2

Let me elaborate on the mildly cryptic question title.

In Python 3 we've got neat exception chaining feature, that lets you add more context to exceptions in the process of their propagation.

Recently, I wanted to attach extra exception information to the exception, but without throwing it straightaway. The code was doing some defensive processing in generator, so I wanted to yield it instead, so I tried something like:

def gen():
   for row in csv_file:
       try:
          yield parse(row)
       except Exception as e:
          yield RuntimeError(f"Bad row: {row}") from e

To my disappointment, that didn't work! Turned out that raise EXCEPTION from CAUSE is a compound operator as PEP-3134 explains.

To get around this in my code, I set __cause__ = e manually and carried on. However, it still bothered me why it was implemented that way.

Imagine instead we had an operator from with the following syntax: EXCEPTION from CAUSE, doing exactly what raise .. from .. is doing, except throwing, and returning new Exception instead. That way:

  • it's compatible, you can still use raise .. from .. syntax (now internally it'd be parsed as raise (.. from ..))
  • it would make everything more composable, allowing to attach cause without necessarily throwing (in particular my usecase). I can that it's a bit unusual use of exceptions though.
  • presumably, that would also make implementation simpler, since you'd not need to modify and clash exiting primitive (simple raise operator). I see it as a main argument for my 'alternative form' of the operator from the perspective of Python language developer.

I've gone through PEP/googled but hasn't really found any rationale. I experimented to check if there is something else apart from __cause__ being set, but it doesn't seem so. I'm attaching bits of code that I used to check that:

def failing():
    raise RuntimeError("function failed!")


def cause_from():
    try:
        failing()
    except Exception as e:
        raise RuntimeError("extra info") from e

def cause_manual():
    try:
        failing()
    except Exception as e:
        ee = RuntimeError("extra info")
        ee.__cause__ = e
        raise ee

It results in the same traceback:

$ python3 -c 'import exc; exc.cause_from()'                                                                                                                                      
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/tmp/exc.py", line 7, in cause_from
    failing()
  File "/tmp/exc.py", line 2, in failing
    raise RuntimeError("function failed!")
RuntimeError: function failed!

The above exception was the direct cause of the following exception:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<string>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/tmp/exc.py", line 9, in cause_from
    raise RuntimeError("extra info") from e
RuntimeError: extra info
$ python3 -c 'import exc; exc.cause_manual()'                                                                                                                                                                                 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/tmp/exc.py", line 13, in cause_manual
    failing()
  File "/tmp/exc.py", line 2, in failing
    raise RuntimeError("function failed!")
RuntimeError: function failed!

The above exception was the direct cause of the following exception:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<string>", line 1, in <module>
  File "/tmp/exc.py", line 17, in cause_manual
    raise ee
RuntimeError: extra info

The only difference in traceback is the line where exception was thrown (raise RuntimeError("extra info") from e vs raise ee). The cause_from version looks somewhat more readable.

So it's the only reason I see for that choice of syntax structure, I wonder if it's also the intended motivation? Is it possible that I miss some subtle effect of raise .. from .. as a compound operator?

  • 2
    Probably because the developers didn't think anyone would go around returning it yielding exceptions. That's not what they're for. They don't even make for a good flag value in your case. Look at how futures are done in multi-threading for an example of what I mean. – Mad Physicist Oct 12 at 15:32
  • @MadPhysicist thanks for your comment, I clarified a bit that my main question is not about allowing my (unconventional, I agree) usecase, but about the ease of implementing it from Python developer's perspective. – karlicoss Oct 12 at 15:40
  • 2
  • @MadPhysicist regarding "That's not what they're for": yep, I used futures, so I can see what you mean. However I find yielding exceptions very convenient on practice since they let me write compact uncluttered code and play well with mypy (as opposed to checking if future.is_error()). – karlicoss Oct 12 at 15:43
  • 1
    What is the point of yielding exceptions? If you yield them, you have to check them like isinstance(something, Exception). It is not the right way of handling exceptions. They must be caught in except clause. To do it you have to raise them first. – sanyash Oct 12 at 16:01