26

I stole this snippet off the web. But it looks to be limited to 4096 bytes and is quite ugly IMO. Anyone know of a better approach? I'm actually using Groovy btw...

String streamToString(InputStream input) {
        StringBuffer out = new StringBuffer();
        byte[] b = new byte[4096];
        for (int n; (n = input.read(b)) != -1;) {
            out.append(new String(b, 0, n));
        }
        return out.toString();
    }

EDIT:

I found a better solution in Groovy:

InputStream exportTemplateStream = getClass().getClassLoader().getResourceAsStream("export.template")
assert exportTemplateStream: "[export.template stream] resource not found"
String exportTemplate = exportTemplateStream.text
49

Some good and fast answers. However I think the best one is Groovy has added a "getText" method to InputStream. So all I had to do was stream.text. And good call on the 4096 comment.

  • 2
    So you checked the docs after asking? At least you could paste an example of its use. – Anon Apr 29 '11 at 21:00
  • 1
    I continued looking after I asked of course, I didn't see the .text method at first. Here is the code snippet:InputStream exportTemplateStream = getClass().getClassLoader().getResourceAsStream("export.template") assert exportTemplateStream: "[export.template stream] resource not found" String exportTemplate = exportTemplateStream.text – phil swenson Apr 30 '11 at 21:53
  • fair enough. But as I've said to others: use the variant that takes an explicit character set -- the default character set is rarely what you want. – Anon Apr 30 '11 at 22:43
12

For Groovy

filePath = ... //< a FilePath object
stream = filePath.read() //< InputStream object

content = stream.getText("UTF-16") //< Specify the encoding, and get the String object

The InputStream class reference

The getText() without encoding, it will use current system encoding, ex ("UTF-8").

8

Try IOUtils from Apache Commons:

String s = IOUtils.toString(inputStream, "UTF-8");
4

You can do it fairly easily using the Scanner class:

String streamToSring(InputStream input) {
    Scanner s = new Scanner(input);
    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
    while (s.hasNextLine()) {
        builder.append(s.nextLine() +"\n");
    }
    return builder.toString();
}
  • You need to pass a character set or you'll have a hard-to-diagnose bug. – Anon Apr 29 '11 at 20:52
  • @Anon, this code may have many bugs in it. Code is only presented as an example; not to be used in production. – jjnguy Apr 30 '11 at 0:37
  • 1
    @jinguy - does presenting buggy code "improve the internet"? Or simply add to rep? – Anon Apr 30 '11 at 11:22
  • @Anon, can't it do both? – jjnguy Apr 30 '11 at 18:09
  • 1
    @Anon, my point is, people shouldn't be copying code off the internet as written and using it directly in their code. – jjnguy Apr 30 '11 at 23:20
4

It's reading the input in chunks of 4096 bytes(4KB), but the size of the actual string is not limited as it keeps reading more and appending it to the SringBuffer.

2

That snippet has a bug: if the input uses a multi-byte character encoding, there's a good chance that a single character will span two reads (and not be convertable). And it also has the semi-bug that it relies on the platform's default encoding.

Instead, use Jakarta Commons IO. In particular, the version of IOUtils.toString() that takes an InputStream and applies an encoding to it.

1

For future reviewers who have similar problems, please note that both IOUtils from Apache, and Groovy's InputStream.getText() method require the stream to complete, or be closed before returning. If you are working with a persistent stream you will nead to deal with the "ugly" example that Phil originally posted, or work with non-blocking IO.

0

You can try something similar to this

new FileInputStream( new File("c:/tmp/file.txt") ).eachLine { println it }

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.