2

I want to send a Kafka message with a payload of a class that extends SpecificRecordBase; it is a class that has been generated with the help of a maven plugin.

One of the fields of my schema has a type of timestamp-millis, which corresponds to the java.time.Instant in the generated class.

The field is defined as follows:

{"name": "processingTime", "type": {
   "type": "long",
   "logicalType": "timestamp-millis"
   }
},

When I create an instance of this class and set the processing time,

setProcessingTime(RandomDate.randomInstant())

everything is ok, but when I run the program and try sending it to Kafka, I get the following error:

org.apache.kafka.common.errors.SerializationException: Can't convert value of class poc.avroGenerated.AvroMeasurement to class poc.avroSerde.AvroSerializer specified in value.serializer
Caused by: java.lang.ClassCastException: class java.time.Instant cannot be cast to class java.lang.Long (java.time.Instant and java.lang.Long are in module java.base of loader 'bootstrap')

Here's my custom serializer class:

@Override
public byte[] serialize(String topic, T data) {

    byte[] result = null;
    try {
        ByteArrayOutputStream byteArrayOutputStream = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
        BinaryEncoder binaryEncoder = EncoderFactory.get().binaryEncoder(byteArrayOutputStream, null);
        DatumWriter<GenericRecord> datumWriter = new GenericDatumWriter<>(data.getSchema());
        datumWriter.write(data, binaryEncoder);
        binaryEncoder.flush();
        byteArrayOutputStream.close();
        result = byteArrayOutputStream.toByteArray();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        LOGGER.error(e);
    }
    return result;
}
3

Use SpecificDatumWriter instead of GenericDatumWriter.

Drop in that one change, and your custom serializer looks fine!

This is frequently a point of confusion. In the Java implementation, "generic" datum do not take into account any customizations that were built into a specific record, including logical type conversions.

3
  • It works! A few more questions: It works both for DatumWriter<GenericRecord> datumWriter = ... and DatumWriter<SpecificRecord> datumWriter = .... Why is it so? Does an implicit casting take place somewhere? Does it impact the way data gets serialized, and thus influences later deserialization processes? – RobertSzooba Oct 15 '19 at 9:06
  • It should also work for DatumWriter<Object> and DatumWriter<T>! As long as the method compiles, it's all the same implementation in the end. (The template type for DatumWriter is erased after compilation any way -- the important thing was to change the implementing class.) – Ryan Skraba Oct 15 '19 at 9:15
  • "This is frequently a point of confusion. In the Java implementation, "generic" datum do not take into account any customizations that were built into a specific record, including logical type conversions.": thank you @RyanSkraba. That explains a lot of things... especially why I got lots of ClassCastException... – l-lin Apr 4 '20 at 16:22

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