1

Problem

I have this function that I need to make it go faster :)

if (length(vec) == 0) { # first case
  count = sum(apply(df, 1, function(x) {
    all(x == 0, na.rm = T)
  }))
} else if (length(vec) == 1) { # second case
  count = sum(df[, vec], na.rm = T)
} else {
  count = sum(apply(df[, vec], 1, function(x) { # third case
    all(x == 1) }), na.rm = T)
}

df is a data.frame with only 1, 0 or NA values. vec is a sub-vector of the colnames(df).

  • First case: count the rows thta after the NA's are removed, they have only 0's (or nothing - e.g. the row had only NA's - you count it too)
  • Second case: count the 1's in the vector (1 column chosen only) after removing the NA's
  • Third case: from the filtered data.frame get the number of rows that have all their values equal to 1.

Question

Is there any way you think that can make this code run faster using dplyr or something else since it manipulates the data frame by row? For example, when I exchanged the easier one (2nd case) - count = sum(df[, vec], na.rm = T) with dplyr: sum(df %>% select(vec), na.rm = T) and did a benchmark, it was considerably worse (but ok I don't think 2nd case can get considerably faster with any method).

Any tips or tricks for 2st and 3rd cases are welcome!

Benchmarking

A huge enough data.frame to play with: df = matrix(data = sample(c(0,1,NA), size = 100000, replace = TRUE), nrow = 10000, ncol = 10).

  • The first case:
rbenchmark::benchmark("prev" = {sum(apply(df, 1, function(x) {all(x == 0, na.rm = T)}))}, "new-long" = {sum((rowSums(df == 0, na.rm = TRUE) + rowSums(is.na(df)) == ncol(df)))}, "new-short" = {sum(!rowSums(df != 0, na.rm = TRUE))}, replications = 1000, columns = c("test", "replications", "elapsed", "relative", "user.self", "sys.self"))

Results:

       test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self
2  new-long         1000   1.267    1.412     1.267        0
3 new-short         1000   0.897    1.000     0.897        0
1      prev         1000  11.857   13.219    11.859        0
  • The third case (vec = 1:5 for example):
rbenchmark::benchmark("prev" = {sum(apply(df[, vec], 1, function(x) { all(x == 1) }), na.rm = T)}, "new" = {sum(!rowSums(replace(df[, vec], is.na(df[, vec]), -999) != 1))}, replications = 1000, columns = c("test", "replications", "elapsed", "relative", "user.self", "sys.self"))

Results:

test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self
2  new         1000   0.179    1.000     0.175    0.004
1 prev         1000   2.219   12.397     2.219    0.000

Overall, nice speedup using the rowSums! Use it too instead of apply!

8
  • You may need rowSums which would be vectorized. Without a reproducible example, it is difficult for others to come up with a solution. For the first case sum(!rowSums(df != 0, na.rm = TRUE)) The second case seems fine and the third case would be sum(!rowSums(df[, vec] !=1, na.rm = TRUE))
    – akrun
    Oct 14 '19 at 15:44
  • @akrun thanks! The third case is wrong though (outputs a lot more rows) - I want to keep only the rows that have all values equal to 1 and add them to the row count...
    – John
    Oct 14 '19 at 16:15
  • Not able to reproduce with this example df <- data.frame(col1 = c(1, 2, 3, 1, 1), col2 = c(1, 1, 2, 1, 2));sum(!rowSums(df!=1, na.rm = TRUE))# [1] 2
    – akrun
    Oct 14 '19 at 16:16
  • Maybe because the df has only 0, 1 and NA (I think)?
    – John
    Oct 14 '19 at 16:20
  • 1
    I know, I know :) Trying to make one!
    – John
    Oct 14 '19 at 16:25
1

Here is an option to optimize the code with rowSums for the first and third case. As there would be edge cases when the rows values are NA, one option is to replace those values with a value not in the dataset, create a logical matrix, use rowSums to convert it to a logical vector and get the sum of TRUE values

sum((rowSums(df == 0, na.rm = TRUE) + rowSums(is.na(df)) == ncol(df)))

Or

sum(!rowSums(df != 0, na.rm = TRUE))
sum(!rowSums(replace(df[, vec], is.na(df[, vec]), -999) != 1))
12
  • The na.rm is needed in the first? (since you replace all NA's with -999)
    – John
    Oct 14 '19 at 16:36
  • @John No, it is not needed, I forgot to remove it. thanks
    – akrun
    Oct 14 '19 at 16:37
  • @John Please let me know if it improved the efficiency
    – akrun
    Oct 14 '19 at 16:37
  • 1
    Ok, testing it a little bit myself and benchmarking it and accepting it afterwards! Thanks!
    – John
    Oct 14 '19 at 16:38
  • 1
    Updated answer with benchmark and overall results. Thanks!
    – John
    Oct 15 '19 at 10:00

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