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I have some linked list code and everything is working until I create my pop_front function in my destructor. The code works everwhere else and I've tried printing the linked list to see if it was created properly and it was. This is the only part of my code where pop_front as been called and the only part where I am deallocating anything

template <typename T>
class DList {
    Node<T>* head;
    Node<T>* tail;
public:
    DList() {
        head = nullptr;
        tail = nullptr;
    }

    void push_front(T newData) {
        Node<T>* newNode = new Node<T>(newData, head, nullptr);
        if (head) {
            head->prev = newNode;
        }
        else {
            tail = newNode;
        };
        head = newNode;
    }
    void push_front(DList<T> newList) {

        newList.tail->next = head;
        head->prev = newList.tail;
        head = newList.head;

    }
    void pop_front() {
        if (head) {
            Node<T>* pop = head;
            head = pop->next;
            if (head) {
                head->prev = nullptr;
            }
            else {
                tail = nullptr;
            }
            delete pop;
        }
    }
    ~DList() {
        while (head) {
            pop_front();
        }
    }
};
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  • 1
    You didn't show the definition of Node, or what its own destructor does. But I see that your push_front(DList<T>) method doesn't take empty lists into account at all, and more importantly it is not releasing ownership of its nodes after linking them to the target list, so you will end up with both source and target lists trying to free the same set of nodes when they are both destructed. – Remy Lebeau Oct 14 '19 at 21:21
  • 1
    In debug mode on some compilers, freed memory is overwritten with the byte DD. If you are seeing this address, then you are almost certainly reading memory that has already been freed somewhere else (use-after-free). Your class is likely not following the rule of three/five. In fact, attempting to copy a DList will cause a use-after-free since you don't value-copy the list. – cdhowie Oct 14 '19 at 21:23
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    When you see a highly repetitive number like 0xDDDDDDDD, odds are good the computer is trying to tell you something. Look it up in this list of Magic Debug Numbers. If you get an odd-looking decimal number, convert it to hexadecimal, then look it up. If you get number that is mostly repetitious but there's noise on the least significant end, you may have a magic number with an offset added. Assume the pattern continues and look it up. – user4581301 Oct 14 '19 at 23:56
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Your DList class (and possibly also the template class Node as well, we can't see its definition) does not follow the rule of three/five. You define a destructor but you don't define a copy constructor or copy assignment operator.

This means that making a copy of a DList at all (which calling DList::push_front(DList<T>) almost certainly will) will cause a use-after-free in the destructor.

Remember that compiler-generated copy constructors and copy assignment operators simply perform a memberwise copy of values. In this case, your values are pointers. Therefore, a copy of a DList object will simply copy the original pointers to the new object.

When one of those objects is destructed, the list will be torn down, however the other object will still be holding pointers to the memory allocations that were freed.

You must implement the copy constructor and copy assignment operator if you wish your type to be copyable, because the compiler-generated versions will do the wrong thing. If you are using C++11, you should also define the move constructor and move assignment operator.

In C++11, you could also delete these constructors and operators and then you'll get a compile-time error everywhere that you attempt to make a copy:

DList(DList const &) = delete;
DList(DList &&) = delete;

DList & operator=(DList const &) = delete;
DList & operator=(DList &&) = delete;

Without the definition of the Node template class I cannot suggest an implementation of the copy constructor or copy assignment operator. However, I can suggest an implementation for the move variants:

void swap(DList & other) {
    std::swap(head, other.head);
    std::swap(tail, other.tail);
}

DList(DList && other) : head(nullptr), tail(nullptr) {
    swap(other);
}

DList & operator=(DList && other) {
    swap(other);
    return *this;
}

Another error:

void push_front(DList<T> newList)

Should be:

void push_front(DList<T> & newList)

Because you modify the "new list" -- it doesn't make much sense to modify a copy. However, the semantic meaning of this doesn't match push_front(T)!

The single-value overload takes a value and pushes it onto this list.

The list overload takes another list and pushes this list onto the other list. It would make much more sense for the list overload to push the other list onto this list as it would mirror the behavior of the single-value overload ("add this thing to this list, whatever that means").

The implementation of this method is also flawed, as it doesn't set either list's pointers to null, which means that you are setting up another use-after-free.

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  • I create an array of linked list, in my main program and if this error is derived from me deallocating something I've already deallocated how can I avoid that with the array? the same linked list will show up at multiple indices so If I want to deallocate the array, wouldn't I have to go through the array and deallocate each linked list separately, then wouldn't the same problem occur when I encounter one I've already deallocated even with a copy constructor and assignment operator? – Exalino Oct 14 '19 at 23:25
  • @Exalino Not with a properly-written copy constructor and copy assignment operator. The issue you're having is that multiple DList instances think that they own the same pointer. Copying a DList instance would involve copying the pointed-to data structures to new allocations so that both lists contain equal sequences of values, but point to different memory allocations. Then when a list is destroyed, it is only freeing its own data. If you post the definition of the Node template class, I may be able to write an example implementation for you. – cdhowie Oct 15 '19 at 1:20

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