118

This question already has an answer here:

Let's create a complementary question to this one. What is the most common way to get the file size in C++? Before answering, make sure it is portable (may be executed on Unix, Mac and Windows), reliable, easy to understand and without library dependencies (no boost or qt, but for instance glib is ok since it is portable library).

marked as duplicate by iammilind c++ Nov 23 '17 at 7:12

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 3
    The fstat functions I believe are portable, and quite easy to use. – ultifinitus Apr 30 '11 at 7:09
  • May dupicated with stackoverflow.com/questions/2409504 – Eric Z Apr 30 '11 at 7:10
  • 13
    Why no boost but allow glib? Boost is also portable. – rve Apr 30 '11 at 7:14
  • 1
    @mmutz: "Portable" has a different meaning than "standard". For example, Boost is more portable than standard C++ because it has workarounds for non-compliancies of compilers (including older versions). Fstat is portable in the strictest sense. – Thomas Edleson Apr 30 '11 at 23:44
  • 1
    @Thomas: There can be no "portable" without a standard. That standard may be in the form of a written document (like POSIX, or C++) and you hope that all implementations are true to it, or it may be by way of a common implementation that has been ported to many platforms (most libraries, incl. Boost). fstat() is standardized in POSIX, but Windows chose to deviate from that standard by calling the funciton _fstat(). fstat() is not portable, because you need an #ifdef _WIN32 to use it. – Marc Mutz - mmutz May 1 '11 at 6:39
144
#include <fstream>

std::ifstream::pos_type filesize(const char* filename)
{
    std::ifstream in(filename, std::ifstream::ate | std::ifstream::binary);
    return in.tellg(); 
}

See http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/files/ for more information on files in C++.

  • 3
    Or just get it from the file system with stat where the size is already maintained. No need to even open the file. – Matt Jun 11 '14 at 20:06
  • 10
    Based on @jterm suggestion, opening the stream would be std::ifstream in(filename, std::ios::binary | std::ios::ate); Just to ease everybody's life ;) – jmpcm Nov 18 '14 at 11:41
  • 4
    @WillingGood the file will be closed after returning of the function. – cfy Feb 5 '15 at 7:29
  • 12
    This answer to a question on SO says that tellg does not report the size of the file, nor the offset from the beginning in bytes. – displayName Oct 26 '15 at 20:38
  • 5
    this is missleading answer, since there is no way to convert pos_type to int/long – Stepan Yakovenko Jan 25 '18 at 10:28
67

While not necessarily the most popular method, I've heard that the ftell, fseek method may not always give accurate results in some circumstances. Specifically, if an already opened file is used and the size needs to be worked out on that and it happens to be opened as a text file, then it's going to give out wrong answers.

The following methods should always work as stat is part of the c runtime library on Windows, Mac and Linux.

long GetFileSize(std::string filename)
{
    struct stat stat_buf;
    int rc = stat(filename.c_str(), &stat_buf);
    return rc == 0 ? stat_buf.st_size : -1;
}

or 

long FdGetFileSize(int fd)
{
    struct stat stat_buf;
    int rc = fstat(fd, &stat_buf);
    return rc == 0 ? stat_buf.st_size : -1;
}

On some systems there is also a stat64/fstat64. So if you need this for very large files you may want to look at using those.

  • 3
    The above code is portable to both C & C++ – Matt Dec 4 '13 at 22:45
  • 3
    +1 For the mention of opening the stream in binary mode. That fixed an issue I was having using the fseek()+ftell() size with read(). – T.E.D. Nov 7 '14 at 20:14
  • 5
    I needed to add #include <sys/stat.h> and GetFileSize(...) works for me. – SyntheticGio Jan 26 '17 at 18:40
  • be aware of the fact that long is 4 byte in Visual Studio, so you have to use f.e. long long to get correct file size for big files on Windows – zboson Jan 16 at 15:55
23

It is also possible to find that out using the fopen(),fseek() and ftell() function.

int get_file_size(std::string filename) // path to file
{
    FILE *p_file = NULL;
    p_file = fopen(filename.c_str(),"rb");
    fseek(p_file,0,SEEK_END);
    int size = ftell(p_file);
    fclose(p_file);
    return size;
}
  • 4
    You do not need <fstream> and <iostream>, you do need <string> and you need error checking. (fseek segfaults when using a NULL file, ftell returns -1 on error) – rve Apr 30 '11 at 16:48
  • 4
    Initializing p_file and overwriting it in the next line is pointless and and makes many lints complain about "unused assignment". – Jens May 27 '12 at 19:26
  • Should you use long for the return type? – Progo Aug 15 '14 at 15:46
  • 4
    " Library implementations are allowed to not meaningfully support SEEK_END (therefore, code using it has no real standard portability)" – stephen May 20 '15 at 14:26
  • Related link: securecoding.cert.org/confluence/display/c/… – rmobis Aug 11 '16 at 22:25
23

Using the C++ filesystem TS:

#include <experimental/filesystem>
namespace fs = std::experimental::filesystem;

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  fs::path p{argv[1]};
  p = fs::canonical(p);

  std::cout << "The size of " << p.u8string() << " is " <<
      fs::file_size(p) << " bytes.\n";
}
  • 5
    worth noting that filesystem is ISO C++ as of C++17 – chappjc Dec 10 '16 at 2:17
  • so is that faster than tellg? – Mohamad Elnaqeeb Mar 7 '18 at 2:11
  • Do we really need to canonicalize the filename first?! – Alexis Wilke Apr 15 at 23:03
3
#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    FILE *f;
    f = fopen("mainfinal.c" , "r");
    fseek(f, 0, SEEK_END);
    unsigned long len = (unsigned long)ftell(f);
    printf("%ld\n", len);
    fclose(f);
}
1

In c++ you can use following function, it will return the size of you file in bytes.

#include <fstream>

int fileSize(const char *add){
    ifstream mySource;
    mySource.open(add, ios_base::binary);
    mySource.seekg(0,ios_base::end);
    int size = mySource.tellg();
    mySource.close();
    return size;
}
0

The code snippet below exactly addresses the question in this post :)

///
/// Get me my file size in bytes (long long to support any file size supported by your OS.
///
long long Logger::getFileSize()
{
    std::streampos fsize = 0;

    std::ifstream myfile ("myfile.txt", ios::in);  // File is of type const char*

    fsize = myfile.tellg();         // The file pointer is currently at the beginning
    myfile.seekg(0, ios::end);      // Place the file pointer at the end of file

    fsize = myfile.tellg() - fsize;
    myfile.close();

    static_assert(sizeof(fsize) >= sizeof(long long), "Oops.");

    cout << "size is: " << fsize << " bytes.\n";
    return fsize;
}

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