0

For example I have this json:

{"a":"some value", "b":"some value", "c": "some ,\" value"}

I need to get:

"a":"some value" and "b":"some value" and "c": "some ," value"

I have ended with this regex (,)(?=(?:[^\"]|\"[^\"]*\")*$), but this doesn't work with third key value pair.

3
  • 2
    Just to clarify, that example is invalid JSON; are you sure this is the format you have? If it was valid JSON, it would be much easier to parse it rather than writing your own regex.
    – IMSoP
    Oct 16 '19 at 12:44
  • updated question, I need to exactly separate json key value by comma, not just parse it
    – Darken Aki
    Oct 16 '19 at 12:48
  • 2
    If you have JSON then use a JSON parser. There's really no need to re-invent the wheel here.
    – MonkeyZeus
    Oct 16 '19 at 13:03
1

If you really must do this with regex then you can try:

(".*?(?<!\\)")\s*:\s*(".*?(?<!\\)")
  • (".*? - start a capture group and match an opening double-quote and lazily match zero or more of any char
  • (?<!\\) - make sure that a \ does not precede the closing double-quote
  • ") - find a closing double-quote and close the capture group
  • \s*:\s* - match a colon : surrounded by optional whitespace
  • (".*?(?<!\\)") - see bullet points 1 through 3

https://regex101.com/r/25qa84/1

3
  • This will not work when not closed quote will be inside value quotes
    – Darken Aki
    Oct 16 '19 at 13:33
  • @DarkenAki What are you talking about? Your example mentions nothing of this and if this is happening then you have invalid JSON to start with.
    – MonkeyZeus
    Oct 16 '19 at 13:34
  • @DarkenAki If the JSON is valid, then quotes inside the quoted string will always be preceded by a backslash, as in your example in the question which has "some ,\" value". The (?<!\\)" in the regex ignores these by looking for "any quote mark not preceded by a backslash"
    – IMSoP
    Oct 16 '19 at 13:56

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.