5

I find myself sometimes building a boolean/mask iteratively, so something like:

mask = initialize_mask_to_true()
for condition in conditions:
  mask = mask & condition

df_masked = pd.loc[mask, my_cols]

Where conditions might be a list of separate boolean masks or comparisons like df[some_col] > someVal Is there a good way to do the initialize_mask_to_true()? Sometimes I'll do something that feels ugly like:

mask = ~(df.loc[:, df.columns[0]] == np.nan)

which works because something == np.nan will always be false, but it feels like there's a cleaner way.

7
  • 1
    mask = np.ones(your_size_here).astype(bool). Oct 16, 2019 at 14:26
  • some_new_condition is what? Oct 16, 2019 at 14:31
  • 1
    I think you could use something like mask = np.logical_and.reduce(your_list_of_masks)
    – ALollz
    Oct 16, 2019 at 14:38
  • 1
    Also the result will broadcast, so you could even just do mask=True then mask & BooleanSeries returns a Series
    – ALollz
    Oct 16, 2019 at 14:42
  • @DanielMesejo some_new_condition just meaning some sort of comparison, like df[a_col] > some_value
    – Andrew
    Oct 16, 2019 at 15:12

2 Answers 2

10

If the index must be preserved:

mask= pd.DataFrame(True,index=df.index,columns=df.columns)

or

mask= pd.DataFrame(True,index=df.index,columns=[df.columns[0]])
2
  • 12
    Nice. Or I think, even cleaner for the second example: mask = pd.Series(True, index=df.index)?
    – Andrew
    Oct 16, 2019 at 15:09
  • 1
    @Andrew Yes, if you don't need the column name.
    – kantal
    Oct 16, 2019 at 15:16
7

I use numpy.ones for that:

np.ones(df.shape[0], dtype=bool)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.