I'm trying to use the :before selector to place an image over another image, but I'm finding that it simply doesn't work to place an image before an img element, only some other element. Specifically, my styles are:

.container
{
   position: relative;
   display: block;
}

.overlay:before
{
    content: url(images/[someimage].png);
    position: absolute;
    left:-20px;
    top: -20px;
}

and I find that this works fine:

<a href="[url]" class="container">
  <span class="overlay"/>
  <img width="200" src="[url]"/>
</a>

but this does not:

<a href="[url]" class="container">
  <img width="200" src="[url]" class="overlay"/>
</a>

I can use a div or p element instead of that span, and the browser correctly overlays my image over the image in the img element, but if I apply the overlay class to the img itself, it doesn't work.

I'd like to get this working because that extra span offends me, but more importantly, I've got about 100 blog posts that I'd like to modify, and I can do this in one go if I could just modify the stylesheet, but if I have to go back and add an extra span element in between the a and img elements, this will be a lot more work.

  • 5
    This is odd, especially since the CSS standard itself gives an example of using :before with an IMG element… – user1141615 Jan 10 '12 at 19:20
  • 1
    Possible duplicate of CSS :after not adding content to certain elements – chharvey Nov 9 '15 at 19:59
  • @chharvey: That question was asked after this one. – Joshua Frank Nov 9 '15 at 20:19
  • oops you're right – chharvey Nov 9 '15 at 20:24
up vote 222 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, most browsers do not support using :after or :before on img tags.

http://lildude.co.uk/after-css-property-for-img-tag

However, it IS possible for you to accomplish what you need with JavaScript/jQuery. Check out this fiddle:

http://jsfiddle.net/xixonia/ahnGT/

$(function() {

    $('.target').after('<img src="..." />');

});

Edit:

For the reason why this isn't supported, check out coreyward's answer.

  • 1
    Okay, so I'm not crazy. +1 for that alone. I'll give your jQuery suggestion a shot and see if that does the trick. Thanks. – Joshua Frank Apr 30 '11 at 16:31
  • Works like a charm. Genius! Marked as answer. – Joshua Frank Apr 30 '11 at 21:43
  • Please explain your downvote. – cwharris Jun 5 '12 at 16:23
  • 3
    your fiddle is missing. That's the beauty of jsFiddle links. – Roko C. Buljan Apr 15 '13 at 11:38
  • Fixed it. Sorry about that. – cwharris Apr 16 '13 at 15:15

The before and after pseudo-selectors don't insert HTML elements — they insert text before or after the existing content of the targeted element. Because image elements don't contain text or have descendants, neither img:before or img:after will do you any good. This is also the case for elements like <br> and <hr> for the same reason.

  • Img tags are clearly elements in and of themselves, and yet we are allowed to insert them before or after other elements using the :before and :after psuedo-selectors. Is this not in the css spec? – cwharris Apr 30 '11 at 17:01
  • 11
    That's a little different. You can insert an image, but not using an image tag — you have to use the content: url(/img/foo.jpg); syntax. See w3.org/TR/CSS21/generate.html for the details. – coreyward Apr 30 '11 at 18:44
  • 1
    Ahh, interesting. Thanks for the clarification. I understand the concept a little better now :) – cwharris Apr 30 '11 at 19:44
  • 4
    Small correction: They insert psuedo-elements, which are more like elements than they are like text nodes. – Chris Calo Oct 8 '13 at 21:57
  • Generated content becomes part of the Shadow DOM. Those new elements, attributes and text nodes are very real. You can see them e.g. in Chrome's Inspector. – Marc Diethelm Oct 7 '14 at 9:12

I found a way to make this work in pure css:

The I'm just fake content-method

a pure CSS method to enable img:after.

You can check out the CodePen: I'm just fake content or see the source.

Source

HTML

<img
    alt="You are watching the ~ I'm just fake content ~ method"  
/>

CSS

img {
    /* hide the default image */
    height:0;
    width:0;

    /* hide fake content */
    font-size:0;
    color:transparent;

    /* enable absolute position for pseudo elements */
    position:relative;

    /* and this is just fake content */
    content:"I'm just fake content";
}

/* initial absolute position */
img:before,
img:after {
    position:absolute;
    top:0;
    left:0;    
}

/* img:before - chrome & others */
img:before {
    content:url(http://placekitten.com/g/250/250);
}

/* img:before - firefox */
body:not(:-moz-handler-blocked) img:before {
    padding:125px;
    background:url(http://placekitten.com/g/250/250) no-repeat;
}

/* img:after */
img:after {
    /* width of img:before */
    left:250px;

    content:url(http://lorempixel.com/350/200/city/1);
}

Browser support

✓ Chrome 10+

✓ Firefox 11+

✓ Opera 9.8+

✓ Safari

No support

⊗ Internet Explorer 8 / 9

Please test in other browsers

  • So basically you just add content:"" to the style of the img tag and :before and :after start working. Nice find, I wonder how cross-browser it is. – w00t Jun 28 '12 at 14:42
  • 2
    I set up an icon test jsbin.com/esewow/edit#html,live and I can confirm it doesn't work on IE8 but on Chrome and Safari it works fine. – w00t Jun 28 '12 at 14:53
  • 10
    The CodePen example only works in Firefox if the src of the img tag is invalid - that causes the alt attribute to be rendered as an element which actually allows :before and :after. If the img src exists, it stops working: codepen.io/anon/pen/EjtDu – thenickdude Aug 13 '13 at 1:45
  • 1
    Stop me if I'm wrong, but it seems it no longer works with Chrome 46 – Gyum Fox Nov 17 '15 at 14:44
  • 3
    img:before and img:after don't work in Safari at all. Not even this, which initially had me excited. Good try though. – Wray Bowling Aug 22 '16 at 16:03

Here's another solution using a div container for img while using :hover::after to achieve the effect.

The HTML as follows:

<div id=img_container><img src='' style='height:300px; width:300px;'></img></div>

The CSS as follows:

#img_container { 
    margin:0; 
    position:relative; 
} 

#img_container:hover::after { 
    content:''; 
    display:block; 
    position:absolute; 
    width:300px; 
    height:300px; 
    background:url(''); 
    z-index:1; 
    top:0;
} 

To see it in action, check out the fiddle I've created. Just so you know this is cross browser friendly and there's no need to trick the code with 'fake content'.

  • It is helpful to apply display: inline-block to #img_container. That'll make the width of the container equal to the image at all screen sizes. So, you don't end up having :after content floating outside of the image. – Anonymous Oct 16 '17 at 7:41

I think the best way to look at why this doesn't work is that :before and :after insert their content before or after the content within the tag you're applying them to. So it works with divs or spans (or most other tags) because you can put content inside them.

<div>
:before
Content
:after
</div>

However, an img is a self-contained, self-closing tag, and since it has no separate closing tag, you can't put anything inside of it. (That would need to look like <img>Content</img>, but of course that doesn't work.)

I know this is an old topic, but it pops up first on Google, so hopefully this will help others learn.

I tried and found a simpler method to do so. Here is the HTML:

    <img id="message_icon" src="messages2.png">
    <p id="empty_para"></p>

What I did was place an empty <p> tag after my image tag. Now I will use p::before to show the image and position it according to my needs. Here is the CSS:

#empty_para
{
    display:inline;
    font-size:40;
    background:orange;
    border:2px solid red;
    position:relative;
    top:-400px;
    left:100px;
}
#empty_para::before
{
    content: url('messages.png');
}

Try it.

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