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I am looking at different alternatives to hash passwords in a Python app. First I was settling for Flask-bcrypt (https://github.com/maxcountryman/flask-bcrypt), but then decided to use Argon2. The most popular Argon2 bindings for Python is argon2-cffi (https://github.com/hynek/argon2-cffi).

According to its' docs (https://argon2-cffi.readthedocs.io/en/stable/api.html), all I need to do is use 3 methods:

  • hash to hash a password
  • verify to compare a password to a hash
  • check_needs_rehash to see if a password should be rehashed after a change in the hashing parameters

Two things puzzle me.

1) The salt is random, using os.urandom. I thus wonder if the verify method is somehow able to extract the salt from the hash? Or in other words, since I have no say in what the salt is and cannot save it, how can the verify method actually ever compare any password to a password that was hashed with a random salt? Am I supposed to somehow parse the salt from the return value of hash myself, and store it separately from the hashed value? Or is the hash supposed to be stored as is in the docs, untouched, and somehow Argon2 is capable of verifying a password against it? And if indeed Argon2 can extract the salt out of the hash, how is using a salt any safer in that case since a hostile entity who gets a hashed password should then also be able to extract the salt?

2) By default I do not supply any secret to the hash method and instead the password itself seems to be used as a secret. Is this secure? What are the downsides for me not supplying a secret to the hashing method?

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1) The salt is random, using os.urandom. I thus wonder if the verify method is somehow able to extract the salt from the hash?

The hash method returns a string that encodes the salt, the parameters, and the password hash itself, as shown in the documentation:

>>> from argon2 import PasswordHasher
>>> ph = PasswordHasher()
>>> hash = ph.hash("s3kr3tp4ssw0rd")
>>> hash  
'$argon2id$v=19$m=102400,t=2,p=8$tSm+JOWigOgPZx/g44K5fQ$WDyus6py50bVFIPkjA28lQ'
>>> ph.verify(hash, "s3kr3tp4ssw0rd")
True

The format is summarized in the Argon2 reference implementation; perhaps there are other references. In this case:

  1. $argon2id$...

    The hash is Argon2id, which is the specific Argon2 variant that everyone should use (combining the side channel resistance of Argon2i with the more difficult-to-crack Argon2d).

  2. ...$v=19$...

    The version of the hash is 0x13 (19 decimal), meaning Argon2 v1.3, the version adopted by the Password Hashing Competition.

  3. ...$m=102400,t=2,p=8$...

    The memory use is 100 MB (102400 KB), the time is 2 iterations, and the parallelism is 8 ways.

  4. ...$tSm+JOWigOgPZx/g44K5fQ$...

    The salt is tSm+JOWigOgPZx/g44K5fQ (base64), or b5 29 be 24 e5 a2 80 e8 0f 67 1f e0 e3 82 b9 7d (hexadecimal).

  5. ...$WDyus6py50bVFIPkjA28lQ

    The password hash itself is WDyus6py50bVFIPkjA28lQ (base64), or 58 3c ae b3 aa 72 e7 46 d5 14 83 e4 8c 0d bc 95 (hexadecimal).

The verify method takes this string and a candidate password, recomputes the password hash with all the encoded parameters, and compares it to the encoded password hash.

And if indeed Argon2 can extract the salt out of the hash, how is using a salt any safer in that case since a hostile entity who gets a hashed password should then also be able to extract the salt?

The purpose of the salt is to mitigate the batch advantage of multi-target attacks by simply being different for each user.

  • If everyone used the same salt, then an adversary trying to find the first of $n$ passwords given hashes would need to spend only about $1/n$ the cost that an adversary trying to find a single specific password given its hash would have to spend. Alternatively, an adversary could accelerate breaking individual passwords by doing an expensive precomputation (rainbow tables).

  • But if everyone uses a different salt, then that batch advantage or precomputation advantage goes away.

Choosing the salt uniformly at random among 32-byte strings is just an easy way to guarantee every user has a distinct salt. In principle, one could imagine an authority handing out everyone in the world a consecutive number to use as their Argon2 salt, but that system doesn't scale very well—I don't just mean that your application could use the counting authority, but every application in the world would have to use the same counting authority, and I think the Count is too busy at Sesame Street to take on that job.

2) By default I do not supply any secret to the hash method and instead the password itself seems to be used as a secret. Is this secure? What are the downsides for me not supplying a secret to the hashing method?

Generally the password is the secret: if someone knows the password then they're supposed to be able to log in; if they don't know the password, they're supposed to be shown the door!

That said, Argon2 also supports a secret key, which is separate from the salt and separate from the password.

If there is a meaningful security boundary between your password database and your application so that it's plausible an adversary might compromise one but not the other, then the application can pick a uniform random 32-byte string as a secret key, and use that with Argon2 so that the password hash is a secret function of the secret password.

That way, an adversary who dumps the password database but not the application's secret key won't even be able to test a guess for a password because they don't know the secret key needed to compute a password's hash.

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The output of hash is actually an encoding of the hash, hash parameters, and salt. You don't need to do anything special with it, just store it normally.

Argon2 is a password hashing algorithm. It doesn't (usually) require any secret. This is secure by design. It's possible to use it with a secret value in addition to the password, which should almost never add any security. It's also possible to use it as a key derivation function, which is almost always wasteful. Neither of these things would reduce security, but they're unnecessary so don't bother.

  • Thank you for your comment. However I am still left wondering what's the point of even using a salt when hashing the password, since if the salt is in the encoded hash that I will store so that any hostile party that get their hands on the encoded hash also then get their hands on the salt? – Spurgu Oct 16 at 13:56
  • It means that two users with the same password get different salts, and thus different hashes. So an attacker has to crack each password individually. Ideally users would have 10-word Diceware passphrases and none of this would be needed, but that's not realistic. People will pick bad passwords, so we mitigate that as best we can. – SAI Peregrinus Oct 16 at 17:48

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