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I need to mark the correct path in the maze below using recursion:

WWWWWWWW
W....W.W
WW.WW..W
W....W.W
W.W.WW.E
S.W.WW.W
WW.....W
WWWWWWWW

Each "W" is a wall, "S" is the start point, "E" is endpoint, and "." is the path the program can take. The recursive method I am using, markCorrectPath(int r, int c) initially passes in the (x,y) coordinates of the "S". When markCorrectPath starts, it initally marks its path with TEMP, "o". When it finds the path, it replaces the "o" with a "*"

Here's my code:

//START = "S", EXIT = "E", TEMP = "o", PATH = "."
public boolean markTheCorrectPath(int r, int c)
   {
      if(r > maze.length - 1 || r < 0 || c > maze[0].length - 1 || c < 0)
         return false;
      if(maze[r][c] == EXIT)
         return true;
      if(maze[r][c] == WALL)
         return false;
      if(maze[r][c] != START)
         maze[r][c] = TEMP;
      if(markTheCorrectPath(r+1, c) == true)
         return true;
      if(markTheCorrectPath(r-1, c) == true)
         return true;
      if(markTheCorrectPath(r, c+1) == true)
         return true;
      if(markTheCorrectPath(r, c-1) == true)
         return true;
      maze[r][c] = PATH;
      return false;
  }

The code starts at (5,0) and moves to (5,1) after seeing that (6,1) and (7,1) are not viable. After that, however, it gets stuck recurring (5,1), (6,1), and (4,1) over and over. This is the StackOverflow.

The expected output should be something like this:

WWWWWWWW
W....W.W
WW.WW..W
W***.W.W
W*W*WW*E
S*W*WW*W
WW.****W
WWWWWWWW
  • 3
    As the size of the maze grows, your computer runs out of memory trying to traverse every possible path between start and end. Algorithms such as breadth first search will enable you to do the search without blowing up computer's memory. – jrook Oct 17 at 23:45
  • 4
    Your program is able to run in circle and that only with two fields. When the program sees an empty space on the left, it will go there and then it sees an empty space on the right and would go back and start repeating these steps. A StackOverflowError is just the logical conclusion of such design flaw. – Tom Oct 17 at 23:58
  • Here you can find several solutions with detailed explanation – Sergei Sirik Oct 18 at 0:03
  • 1
    Give your program some memory to let it remember where it is coming from, so it won't walk backwards (walking backwards is implicitly given by going back up the recursion chain). – Tom Oct 18 at 0:29
  • 1
    To build on what Tom said, you can mark where you've been to with a wall (W, I presume) and so your program will not return to that square to search once more. – Leftist Tachyon Oct 18 at 2:14

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