1

I have a little nuisance in my project, that I can't resolve: The compiler doesn't see that the associated type is the same as the concrete type and won't let my do an assignement.

Playground

Does anyone know how to fix it. Thank you for taking your time.

Artos

// This program fails to compile 
// Compiler doesn't see that the associated type and type of user id are the same. 
struct User {
    pub id: u64,
}

trait KeyTrait {
    type Key;
    fn key(&self) -> Self::Key;
}

impl KeyTrait for User {
    type Key = u64;
    fn key(&self) -> Self::Key {
        self.id
    }
}

trait PrintTrait {
    fn print_key<K: KeyTrait>(key: K);
}

impl PrintTrait for User {
    fn print_key<K: KeyTrait>(key_impl: K) {
        let id: u64 = key_impl.key(); // Raises error: expected u64, found associated type

        println!("Found key {}", id);
    }
}

fn main() {
    let user = User { id: 5 };
    User::print_key(user);
}
  • 1
    In your case key_impl is actually a User , instead of generic parameter you might want to use &self to infer the associated type. Here is an implementation – Ömer Erden Oct 18 at 10:43
  • Otherwise you need to provide associated type explicitly, here is an implementation without &self – Ömer Erden Oct 18 at 10:47
  • I tried the explicit version, but have failed for 1.5h. &self however works in my project. Thank you Ömer for your time! – Arto Oct 18 at 10:58
1

This code makes the assumption that every implementation of KeyTrait has the same associated Key type.

impl PrintTrait for User {
    fn print_key<K: KeyTrait>(key_impl: K) {
        let id: u64 = key_impl.key();
        println!("Found key {}", id);
    }
}

In fact, an implementation of KeyTrait could choose any type.

You can encode this assumption in the type system:

trait PrintTrait {
    fn print_key<K>(key: K)
    where
        K: KeyTrait<Key = u64>;
}

impl PrintTrait for User {
    fn print_key<K>(key_impl: K) 
    where
        K: KeyTrait<Key = u64>,
    {
        let id: u64 = key_impl.key();
    }
}

Or, if you need PrintTrait to be generic over all possible associated Key types:

trait PrintTrait<T> {
    fn print_key<K>(key: K)
    where
        K: KeyTrait<Key = T>;
}

impl PrintTrait<u64> for User {
    fn print_key<K>(key_impl: K) 
    where
        K: KeyTrait<Key = u64>,
    {
        let id: u64 = key_impl.key();
    }
}
  • Thanks Peter for your clear explanation. Now I not only have a working solution from Ömer, but I even understand what's going on in my code :). Have to admit generics in Rust sometimes crank my brain. – Arto Oct 18 at 12:38

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